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Pseudonym "Pseudonym" (Niedersachsen /Germany)

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Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth About Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar - Your Brain's Silent Killers
Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth About Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar - Your Brain's Silent Killers
by David Perlmutter
Edition: Paperback
Price: 9.79

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars marvelous, 6 April 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
started reading it for new year and implemented not eating bread (and nudles and anything that contains wheat, barley and rye). three months later
1. a 30 year old cough has disappeared
2. no knee problems
3. no reflux
4. dont seem to catch a cold anymore

and the best is that I can drink red wine again without getting stomach problems.


Fighting Power: German and U.S. Army Performance, 1939-1945 (Contributions in Military History)
Fighting Power: German and U.S. Army Performance, 1939-1945 (Contributions in Military History)
by Martin Van Creveld
Edition: Paperback
Price: 12.18

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars top book for managing people, 30 July 2010
Obviously war and peace time is very different. Nonetheless I found many parallels to who people think and operate. The German Wehrmacht applied motivational principles very different to modern management technics. This book makes it very clear that there is a different route to the Mc Kinseys or Boston Consulting.

To be clear - the Concept of Auftragsführung is much older than the Third Reich. It originated in the Napoleonic Wars and was then applied by Preussians after the battle of Jena. None of this had to do with the attrociaties commited. Many times these principles actually prevented them.

Crefeld, himself being a jew, makes the point that the only armed force applying Auftragsführung today are the Israeli Defense forces.

I myself am an IT manager and need to motivate people every day. If you like to understand what could be wrong in a larger enterprise about motivation, then this book will give you a clue.


Darkness in El Dorado: How Scientists and Journalists Devastated the Amazon
Darkness in El Dorado: How Scientists and Journalists Devastated the Amazon
by P Tierney
Edition: Hardcover

3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pedophiles, Führer Gene and Measles, 27 May 2010
This book was an eye opener to practices of Chagnon, Neel and Lizot. Chagnon overstated the violence of the Yanomamö. Neel seems to have instigated a measles epidemic to find out how an epidemic spreads in a population with no defenses. Lizot wrote of the spirituality and sexuality of the Yanomamö and was a pedophile.

Not all claims of Tierney could be uphold in court. But how would this be possible? The measles epidemic is decades past. Lizot certainly won't come to Venezuela to face the claims. Neel died almost ten years ago.

The book teaches a lot how people can start to act when they have complete freedom and are not accountable. Funny enough while there have been many people writing about the Yanomamö these three have been professionally the most successful. It also teaches us about our perception and about what we would like to see.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 19, 2011 5:07 PM BST


Evolution in Four Dimensions: Genetic, Epigenetic, Behavioral, and Symbolic Variation in the History of Life (Philosophical Issues in Biology & Psychology)
Evolution in Four Dimensions: Genetic, Epigenetic, Behavioral, and Symbolic Variation in the History of Life (Philosophical Issues in Biology & Psychology)
by Eva Jablonka
Edition: Paperback
Price: 17.96

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Oustanding overview of Evolution, 13 April 2010
Summary

Thesis: Jablonka and Lambs thesis is that evolution is taking place in four distinct areas: genetic, epigenetic, behavioral and symbolic. They refute the standard dogma, that evolution is only possible on stochastic changes of the gene. The picture is a lot more complex as not only the phenotypes of nature have evolved but also the mechanisms that produce them.

The way the modern synthesis came into place needs to be looked as under a historical perspective. The idea of evolution was certainly in the air during the late 19th century. Unfortunately, no one including Darwin had a clear idea about how the mechanisms work. Instrumental in paving the way for the modern dogma was Weissman, who categorically denied an influence of the phenotype to the genotype. At the turn of the century Mendel hit the scene and it was clear that there must be something like a double stranded gene. During 1952 Crick and Watson discovered the double helix structure of the DNA. Furthermore it was discovered that radiation can change DNA. Hence it was assumed that all change leading to changes in the DNA and phenotype are stochastic events that are then selected by nature.

However, it was long understood that epigenetic mechanisms are at work in the forming of embryos. During embryo formation all cells have got the same DNA. Yet proteins formed are completely different during the formation of the embryo - otherwise it would be impossible to have a structured organism forming. The basic questions that was not asked - if these mechanisms are at work for the formation of embryos in any vertebrate and other multi cell organisms - why should they not be used by nature to change an organism over several generations and adapt to volatile environment?

These epigenetic changes are now well documented in many processes - while the new trend is still very young. Cancer might be related to epigenetic changes and could promise a new route into curing it. Viruses contain proteins that change 100.000 times faster than the rest of the organisms to provide an ever changing surface for attacking antibodies. Human's size is statistically dependent on different nutrition during pregnancy of mothers. Undernourishment can create smaller size babies who do not flourish well in rich environments. A high incidence of diabetes B is linked to it.

However, even on the behavioral front changes can happen. This is certainly so in the animal world, but even documented in the human world. Humans consume milk for a few thousand years only. In countries with higher milk consumption the population has adapted to be able to digest lactose sugars. This has happened particularly in northern Europe, less so in Southern Europe or Asia and Africa.
They then also discuss symbolic evolution. They are severely criticizing Dawkins concept of a meme. An egoistic concept that is jumping from human to human seems a bit imposable and one sided. Rather it seems that concepts themselves undergo an evolution. They are less static than a gene and more flexible, yet they are clearly able to influence the environment via the human brain.


The Evolution of Morality (Life & Mind: Philosophical Issues in Biology & Psychology)
The Evolution of Morality (Life & Mind: Philosophical Issues in Biology & Psychology)
by Richard Joyce
Edition: Paperback
Price: 14.95

0 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I felt asleep after opening the book, 13 April 2010
If you expect a book covering morality and evolution in an involving, exciting way - forget it. Looks like a philosophy student has managed to publish his Phd thesis.

Boooring.


The Murderer Next Door: Why the Mind Is Designed to Kill
The Murderer Next Door: Why the Mind Is Designed to Kill
by David M Buss
Edition: Paperback
Price: 9.48

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Crime explained, 13 April 2010
Buss explains lucidly why we are (potential) murderers - there is good evolutionary sense in it! The instinct to murder resides in all of us. Ever thought you'd like to kill your wife? According to Buss you wouldn't be the first, perfectly normal middle class man to do it!

Stepfathers murder because they want to make room for their own off spring. Mothers murder their own children for freedom of finding another partner. Just don't mention the war....

Fortunately, there are also counter instincts in place that keep us in balance. What today is prison (and death penalty in some countries) was a risk in paleontological societies as well. Maybe not a prison, but humans definitely do make a cost-benefit analysis for planed murder.

Very good read and not too complicated for evolutionary psychology.


World Economic Historical Statistics
World Economic Historical Statistics
by Carlos Sabillon
Edition: Paperback
Price: 19.54

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent source of information, 22 Mar 2010
the book has got good GDP data for the last centuries. Since 1800s its on each decade. This is great.

Also the analysis of historical data is good and has got sound ideas.


The Return of Depression Economics
The Return of Depression Economics
by Paul Krugman
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.99

1 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Standard Economists writing, no in depth analysis, 22 Mar 2010
If you are an economist (or in the ever smaler group of people holding economists at high esteem) you will like the book. Krugmann is outspoken, makes jokes and has got an inside knowledge of what happened. So there is all reason to be exited if you are in the club of economists. Personally, I would still prefer Stiglitz analysis. It somewho seems more enticing and understanding. Stiglitz has just got more will to change anything.

But at the end of the day this is just typical economists rambling:
1. Krugmann has got no opinion of why there was no financial crisis until the 70s. After this we seem to be struck by them with ever increasing intensity.
2. Japan went into trouble in the 90s - quite obviously because there was no growth? So why was there no growth? Was Japan possibly one of the first countries feeling Chinas competition or are som other unterlying factors changing?
3. Are we changing sociologically? Why do we accept people making rainfall profits as during internet bubble or the housing bust of 2008?

Therefore - Read it if you are an eonomist, read it if you want to know what economists think. But dont go there for an in depth analysis, because at Krugmann talks rubbish. On a very high level, but he talks rubbish.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 14, 2011 9:20 PM BST


The Spirit Level: Why More Equal Societies Almost Always Do Better
The Spirit Level: Why More Equal Societies Almost Always Do Better
by Richard Wilkinson
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars OK for an economist, 18 Mar 2010
I guess for an economist not knowing about paleontolithic research its a good book. The book is working on new data made available by world bank - I guess only now we have got data to make such a wide comparison over that many countries.

They say that inequality is not good for society as a whole and back it up with a large chunk of data. As far es I am concerned, I would have prefered numbers on the charts - but here you go, probably not good for popular demand.

The analysis itself disregards any evolutionary research there is. Man is not, like any vertebrate living in groups, a completely equal "animal". Rather there is a complex relationship in groups between alphas and betas. You would probably learn more on human group behavior reading Franz de Wall or any the moral Animal by Robert Wright.

But than again - for economists its sufficient. They normally cant handle more than one perspective. Just a bit strange, that the authors themselves are not economists.


Remotely Controlled: How television is damaging our lives
Remotely Controlled: How television is damaging our lives
by Aric Sigman
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.29

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Truely Brilliant, 12 Jan 2010
The book clearly explains why television is dangerous and how dangerous it actually is. Sigman is taking evidence from brain research, biology, archeology and neurology.

Essentially his argument is that
a) Television works very much like hypnosis and essentially produces a reduction of our frontal lobs responsible for critical thinking,
b) that it is particularly dangerous for children under three. Their brain is still forming and requires an environment that makes the children move, speak and think. Television is not doing any of this.
c) furthermore it produces a "pseudo social group" and false social reference patterns. This not only destroys a lot of local culture but causes bolemy with girls, men and women who have a false sense of their bodies. Females going splashing out on clothes, men just thinking of model type bodies.

These are the most important facts that I can remember after reading the book a couple of months ago. The book is clearly well written and a good read for anybody whose neurons have not yet been fried by television.

After reading the book I have dramatically reduced my television time and found this a very pleasant change of my live.


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