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Stephen King (Lincoln, Lincs United Kingdom)
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Logo 3 Rot Workbook Single Euro Edition (Logo! for 11-14)
Logo 3 Rot Workbook Single Euro Edition (Logo! for 11-14)
by Harriette Lanzer
Edition: Paperback

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exam revision made easy, 21 Feb 2012
The book was exactly what we wanted. My son had been off after an accident and the school informed us that he was to sit part of a GCSE when he returned. This enabled us to help him prepare. Clearly presented in a format for 14/15 year olds that made the process of preparing for a science exam interesting.


Gerrard: My Autobiography
Gerrard: My Autobiography
by Steven Gerrard
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.29

5.0 out of 5 stars I'm not a scouser, honest!, 22 Aug 2007
The heart of the Liverpool team has produced a book with heart. Honest and candid where he could be it is a revealing insight into the background of the Liverpool skipper. Much as he is on the pitch, Gerrard does not hide from contoversy or the challenge of discussing difficult periods in his career. As down to earth as a multimillion earning star can be Gerrard reveals how he coped when under pressure from Chelsea to leave Liverpool and does not pull punches in discussing Liverpool's role in the debacle. Better than you're average footballer's autobiography the will to win shine's through.


Wide Sargasso Sea (Penguin Twentieth Century Classics)
Wide Sargasso Sea (Penguin Twentieth Century Classics)
by Jean Rhys
Edition: Paperback

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sargasso Sean, 1 Aug 2004
Great novels should subvert certain traditions and conventions and Wide Sargasso Sea certainly does that. It provides the voice of 'the other', the unknowable mad wife, Bertha in Jane Eyre. Rhys' response to Jane Eyre is to provide us with a haunting, unnerving account of Antoinette, Bertha's real name. It has no chapter division and moves from one narrative voice to another without warning. This supports the overall theme of displacement and dreams. The issues of race and gender are accurately portrayed as more complex than black and white, male and female. Slavery and freedom are highlighted not just in the emancipation act but also in asking us who are now the real slaves, the former slave owners. Much of the character description is given through Antoinette's stream of consciousness and dialogue which must have been a shock to its English audience in the sixties when people were not that well-travelled. Overall, from its opening page providing hints of a dark past and a possibly thwarted future to its Thelma and Louise like ending this book holds us in suspense and makes us rethink assumptions held by many to this day.


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