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Field Marshall Haig (London, UK)

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Kitchen Replacement Cooker Pan Pot Kettle Lids Handle Knob
Kitchen Replacement Cooker Pan Pot Kettle Lids Handle Knob
Offered by Magic&Gorgeous
Price: £1.02

5.0 out of 5 stars Difficult to find item, 1 Mar 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Replacement knobs are quite difficult to find. Many people like me have quality pans over 20 years old (e.g. the 'old' high quality Prestige Lifetime collection) for which replacement knobs are no longer available, despite the pans themselves being good for another 50 years. These knobs fit not only lids with a hole through for the screw, but also the many pans with a welded-on screw thread, as it is the same size. These knobs are made in China, and I was initially sceptical, because I have obtained inferior Chinese knobs on eBay, in which the screw has been made of mild steel, rather than stainless, and has rusted. The specification of these knobs is that they are stainless steel and therefore will not rust. I would not describe these knobs as being high quality items, but they are fairly substantial, and represent good value for money.


Dunlopillo Super Comfort Latex Pillow
Dunlopillo Super Comfort Latex Pillow
Offered by HomeSpace Direct
Price: £52.98

76 of 84 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Recent pillows have changed : much too firm and like a brick, 10 Feb 2012
I think I have discovered the reason why these pillows are so bad. Since 2002 the Dunlopillo brand was owned by two separate companies, one of which made beds in Huntingdon and the other of which made pillows in Harrogate. The firm making pillows was taken over by an American company and the operation closed down. Dunlopillo pillows are now made by the same company as makes the beds, to a different specification, using a much firmer latex.

However, for those who are looking for a pillow that is similar to the old-style Dunlopillo pillows, the American company that took over the British pillow operation makes a very similar if not identical product called the Rejuvenite Restora.
Comment Comments (7) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 4, 2014 12:24 PM GMT


Dunlopillo Serenity Latex Pillow Slim
Dunlopillo Serenity Latex Pillow Slim
Offered by U Stores
Price: £51.86

147 of 157 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars New 'improved' model is terrible, 10 Feb 2012
As others have said, Dunlopillo have changed the specification of this pillow from a very soft and comfortable latex to a hard and solid latex. In the past I have been willing to pay for the comfort of a Dunlopillo pillow, but I cannot see why anyone would want to pay a premium for one of these new models.

I think I have discovered the reason why these pillows are so bad. Since 2002 the Dunlopillo brand was owned by two separate companies, one of which made beds in Huntingdon and the other of which made pillows in Harrogate. The firm making pillows was taken over by an American company and the operation closed down. Dunlopillo pillows are now made by the same company as makes the beds, to a different specification, using a much firmer latex.

However, for those who are looking for a pillow that is similar to the old-style Dunlopillo pillows, the American company that took over the British pillow operation makes a very similar if not identical product called the Rejuvenite Restora.


Dunlopillo Super Comfort Latex Pillow
Dunlopillo Super Comfort Latex Pillow
Offered by U Stores
Price: £51.75

91 of 97 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars May suit some people, but could be a costly mistake., 10 Feb 2012
This pillow is described as 'new and improved'. Although it may be new it is certainly not improved.

I have been using Dunlopillo pillows for over 30 years, as I find they are so superior to other types of pillow, and when travelling by car, alway taken one on holiday as I find the pillows provided in hotels and holiday cottages are often not comfortable enough. However, in the last year or two, the designs have changed. Dunlopillo pillows used to be soft and comfortable, but this particular pillow is too hard and too thick. It may suit some people, but it doesn't suit me.

I think I have discovered the reason why these pillows are so bad. Since 2002 the Dunlopillo brand was owned by two separate companies, one of which made beds in Huntingdon and the other of which made pillows in Harrogate. The firm making pillows was taken over by an American company and the operation closed down. Dunlopillo pillows are now made by the same company as makes the beds, to a different specification, using a much firmer latex.

However, for those who are looking for a pillow that is similar to the old-style Dunlopillo pillows, the American company that took over the British pillow operation makes a very similar if not identical product called the Rejuvenite Restora.
Comment Comments (6) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 6, 2013 10:44 AM BST


How Young They Died
How Young They Died
by Stuart Cloete
Edition: Paperback

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best First World War novel ever written, 25 Jan 2012
This review is from: How Young They Died (Paperback)
I first encountered this novel back in the early 1970s at a time when novels about the First World War were not in fashion. I was myself at an age when men of my father's and grandfathers' generations had been involved in wars, and wanted to find out more about what the First World War had really been like, and to explore how I might have reacted under similar circumstances. I saw 'How Young They Died' in a bookshop, bought it, and read it over a weekend. I found it fascinating. During the following decade I read virtually every First World War novel that had been published, but `How Young They Died' always remained my favourite and I re-read it several times. My interest in the First World War has not diminished, but since then I have concentrated on factual accounts.

With the recent appearance of the film of `War Horse' and dramatisation of `Birdsong' I felt now might be the time to revisit some of the novels I had read as a young adult. I looked on Amazon and saw that `How Young They Died' has 2 reviews, whereas `Birdsong' has 346, which I find quite incredible, as `How Young They Died' is much superior to `Birdsong' and has the added credibility of having been written by someone who had actually experienced what he was writing about.

I was amazed to discover that `How Young They Died' is out of print and has apparently disappeared without trace, although second-hand copies are available, which explains the paucity of reviews. In my opinion it is the best First World War novel ever written.


Census: The Expert Guide
Census: The Expert Guide
by Peter Christian
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not quite as expert as I had expected, 4 Jan 2012
There are various reasons why people cannot be found in the censuses, sometimes because they were not enumerated, sometimes because they were incorrectly enumerated, and in other cases because they were enumerated in a non-standard format. The latter mainly applies to people in institutions, such as workhouses and lunatic asylums, who were often not enumerated under their full name, but under first initial and surname or just initials. After discovering this (long before reading this book), I was able to find an individual in a lunatic asylum (as they were called at the time) in one of the censuses listed only under their initials, who I had previously been unable to find. However, there seems to be no information on this topic in this book, and there are no entries for 'lunatics' or 'lunatic asylums' (or their modern 'politically correct' equivalents) in the index.

Although this is a detailed description of the censuses from 1841-1911, there is perhaps too much detail on the characterisitcs of various online services (which very soon gets out of date) and insufficient or no information on how the various censuses dealt with 'unusual cases' that can result in people not being found (the criteria for which varied from one census to another) such as soldiers, sailors, merchant seamen, pauper lunatics and inmates of workhouses. This book is a good comprehensive introduction to the censuses, and the online services that were available at the time the book was published, but cannot really be described as 'the expert guide'.


Solar Lighting Kit 1
Solar Lighting Kit 1
Offered by Green Retailer
Price: £38.00

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An innovative product let down by inferior components, 29 Oct 2011
This review is from: Solar Lighting Kit 1
I wanted to have bright, switch-operated lighting in my shed, and after carrying out some research on the alternatives, decided on a solution using a solar-rechargeable 12v lead-acid battery. I had read some online reviews elsewhere of the SolarMate, and had expected the plastic electrical parts (i.e. bulb holder and wall switch) to be of poor quality, which turned out to be the case. Indeed, one of the reviews (on the Tesco website) written over 2 years ago stated: "the plastic lamp holder is very cheaply made and cracked easily and the threaded part you screw the bulb in came away while putting the bulb in first time" which is exactly what happened to me!

Rather than requesting the replacement of an inferior component by an identical product I decided to source a higher quality replacement myself. However, obtaining an Edison Screw batten lampholder is not as simple as I had imagined. They are not available in DIY chains, and have to be sourced from specialist electrical/lighting shops or the internet. I purchased a much higher-quality replacement on eBay.

It is also worth mentioning that, although superficially resembling a domestic AC lighting circuit, in which the polarity of wiring to the lampholder is unimportant, in this DC circuit the polarity is critical. If you use a replacement for the cheap and nasty lampholder supplied, it is necessary to ensure that it is wired the right way round.


MEGAVIEW 70 AV & IR OVER COAX EXTENDER KIT
MEGAVIEW 70 AV & IR OVER COAX EXTENDER KIT

5.0 out of 5 stars Watch recorded programmes in a different room, 20 July 2011
Having unsuccessfully tried a wireless product that did not provide an acceptable picture, I looked for a wired solution. This was the only product I could find that offered what I was looking for. I can now watch programmes that have been recorded on my HDD, which is connected to the main TV in the living room, on another TV in the bedroom. Not only that, but I can also control playback in the bedroom using the HDD remote control.


Affluenza
Affluenza
by Oliver James
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.24

6 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Boring and tedious, 2 Mar 2009
This review is from: Affluenza (Paperback)
This book occupies 570 pages, but the essence of what the author is saying could be condensed into about 5 pages. It is possible to understand the concept of affluenza from the book jacket and by skim-reading the first few pages. The rest of the book is just padding, and does not add any further useful information.

I got bored before the end of the first chapter but persisted as someone had bought me the book as a present and I felt under some obligation to read it. I hope that the book would get better the further I got into it, but that did not prove to be the case. When I reached the end I felt I had wasted my time.


Army Records: A Guide for Family Historians
Army Records: A Guide for Family Historians
by William Spencer
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.34

20 of 26 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A comprehensive guide let down by sloppy editing, 18 April 2008
This is essentially the 3rd edition of 'Army Records for Family Historians'. The 2nd edition was published in 1999, when the National Archives was the Public Record Office. At that time the online catalogue was in its infancy and no documents had been digitised.

The new edition brings the previous edition up to date, but this has been done in a rather haphazard fashion. The book gives the impression that very little copy editing has taken place and there are many errors and inconsistencies of style. Some examples follow:

In the Acknowledgements on the title page verso, 'which has led me' appears as 'which has lead me'.

On page 9, after giving the address of the National Archives, the following sentence appears: 'The Office is open from 09:00-17:00 Mondays and Fridays, 09:00-19:00 on Tuesday and Thursday, 10:00-17:00 on Wednesday and 09:30-17:00 on Saturday.' Firstly, what is 'The Office'? It would seem that the initial sentence giving the address originally referred to The Public Record Office, and the second sentence has not been changed to 'The Archives are open ...' to reflect this. Secondly, why are the days Monday and Friday in plural form and the other days in singular form? This is sloppy editing.

On the same page, there is reference to Kew Gardens station, which is said to be on 'London Transport's District Line'. London Transport was replaced by Transport for London some time ago.

On page 47, reference is made to Kevin Asplin's Roll of The Imperial Yeomanry, Scottish Horse and Lovat Scouts who fought in the (second) Boer War, published in two volumes, but no mention of the freely-available website that contains the same information.

At the time the earlier edition was written, the Soldiers' Documents in WO97 for 1760-1854 could be searched using a computerised index at the PRO (as it then was) but these records have now been incorporated into the online catalogue. That these records can be searched using the catalogue is mentioned on pages 44-45, but in a case study on page 59, it is stated that there is 'an index available on computer' and it would seem that this section has not been revised.

There are some dubious entries in the list of dates on page 156. The date of the start of the Crimean War is given as 14 September 1854, which is the date that the British Army landed in the Crimea, but Britain declared war on Russia on 28 March. The next entry: 1854, 25 October - 1857, 6 December: Charge of the Light Brigade, Battle of Balaclava, is rather mystifying. The Crimean War was over by 6 December 1857, and presumably this date refers to the Third Battle of Cawnpore during the Indian Mutiny.

On page 162, there is a reference to the Public Record Office, rather than The National Archives, and the title of Amanda Bevan's book is given as 'Tracing Your Ancestors in the Public Record Office', although the publisher is correctly given as TNA! There is a further reference to 'The Office' on this page.

Capitalisation of titles in the list of references on pages 163-164 is inconsistent.

These are just the errors that jumped out at me on a first reading, but I am sure there must be many more.

In summary, although this is an up-to-date and comprehensive book for the family historian with army ancestors, it is seriously let down by numerous minor errors, and would have benefited from more extensive copy editing and proofreading.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 11, 2008 10:16 PM BST


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