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V. Crook (UK)
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Blood Sugar 101: What They Don't Tell You about Diabetes
Blood Sugar 101: What They Don't Tell You about Diabetes
by Jenny Ruhl
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.00

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Advice Ever, 28 Dec 2010
Diagnosed as a LADA type diabetic, no I'd never heard of it either, three years ago I just found this book. It is brilliant in its layout and advice. Mush of what it says is relevant to me and I intend to start following the advice right away. I am even going to recommend it to my diabetic nurse advisor and my doctor who seems to be stuck a bit in the past. Keeps trying to push statins on me even thought they aren't good for diabetics or women in general. If you buy one book about your diabetes make it this one and then Dr. Bernsteins.


Olympia  [Standard Edition]
Olympia [Standard Edition]
Price: £4.79

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars No Poseur Like an Old Poseur, 5 Nov 2010
I have been listening to Bryan Ferry since I was a teenager in awe of the early Roxy Music songs. I have tracked his career ever since, watching as he postured and posed his way through a series of different incarnations and listening to the subtle changes of style from album to album. I went with him as he developed a smoother more atmospheric style, ultimately producing what I can only describe as "lounge lizard" music. I despaired at "Mamouna" and "Dylanesque" which offered the blandest stuff I have ever heard from him, and I offered a silent prayer of thanks that there was still a small hope that he wouldn't just fade into obscurity when I heard the first bars on "Frantic".

I approached "Olympia" with trepidation. After the much hoped for new Roxy album failed to materialise I was desperate for something new from him, and when I played the album the first time, my heart sank. Mood music! Over-produced, fading voice, just more "Mamouna". But I decided to give it another go and lo and behold it started to grow on me, I really listened to it and found subtlties in the lyrics and music that I had missed on my first run-through. And I started to get it, I really started to relax into it and feel the mood. And then I literally sat bolt upright when listening on the iPod on the train, halfway through "Song to the Siren" and thought - "now where the hell has this one been hiding"? What a wonderful song, and I have never really liked Tim Buckley's original, perfect vocals, dreamy instrumentals, and as it says on the album itself what a beautiful chord change at the start of each verse. I fell in love with this song. And then on to "No Face No Name No Number" and I was enraptured until the end of "Tender is the Night". The second half has some classic Ferry tracks. And then I went back and listened to the first half again, and I really started to appreciate what Mr Ferry has done. Yes, there are a couple of tracks where you wish his producers had sat him down and said "We know you like the song Bryan but, listen, it's a mess" but that was ever the case - "Stranded" excepted. He may be on the wrong side of middle-aged but the talent to write or arrange a song has not yet withered, and as usual he has surrounded himself with the best of the best in musicians.

Maybe not quite the third coming as claimed by one of his producers, but a definite technical knock out which leaves you wanting more. But if only they had made a film of "Song to the Siren" and used that to publicise the album instead of the ones they have chosen. I reckon that would have guaranteed a chart album.


Dexter by Design
Dexter by Design
by Jeffry P. Lindsay
Edition: Hardcover

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointly Dodgy Dexter, 4 April 2009
This review is from: Dexter by Design (Hardcover)
Oh, how I waited impatiently for this book to appear. Having discovered Dexter through the TV series, and then moved on to the books and found them superior, the prospect of the fourth novel was almost too much to cope with and remain sane.

And how good it felt to start reading, especially as the supernatural angle of the previous one had gone and we were back to the slighly baroque and surrealistic world of Dexter's powerful brain. And even laugh out loud moments with Doakes' talking computer. A great and wonderfully over the top story began to unfold.

All was going well until the last few pages and......... what the hell happened, Jeff? A pointless excursion to Cuba, and a rushed and frankly camp finale that gave the impression our man had no real idea of how to finish off his story. And the loose ends! Debs in psycho logical limbo, videos and other incriminatory evidence left out where the Police would eventually come across it if they did even a cursory investigation of the bad guy, and Dexter somehow getting over a bloodlust without indulging himself.

I still look forward to number 5, but I hope it will be better plotted out than this one which promised so much for 90% of the story. Please Jeff, don't go the way of Tom Clancy and start skimping us.


Before Dishonor (Star Trek: The Next Generation)
Before Dishonor (Star Trek: The Next Generation)
by Peter David
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: £5.99

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Borg Are Back - Again, 24 Nov 2007
OK, so Star Trek books aren't great works of literature, and they are really aimed at a specific market of fans. That said, the best ones provide an entertaining diversion from normal life and if they get one extra person to start reading instead of staring at a computer screen all day, then they are worthwhile.

Peter David is one of the ST authors who ticks all the boxes on that. He obviously loves the subject, and his enthusiasm shines out from every page. His books are consistently amongst the most entertaining in this particular franchise, and his style is very easy to read. So I was looking forward to him rounding out the Borg story which started in "Resistance".

Plus points - without too many spoilers. David does his usual job of putting together a fun story with some good ideas, and some welcome bits of humour in the exchanges between the characters. The way in which he manages to resurrect the Borg, giving the cube itself life, is a good device and the story barrels along at great pace. The Borg back as baddies with no redeeming features is very welcome after the interminable Voyager stories with drones existing in secret heavenly cyber worlds, and the threat that they might even be on the way to challenging the Q is chilling, and has got to be worth re-visiting in the future.

Not so good points. David has always had a habit of lifting ideas from his favourite episodes of both the original trek and TNG, as do some of the other authors, and he does it again here. In fact he even revisits an earlier, and unimpressive, book which is a bit tiresome. He also, makes a sudden change to recently introduced characters which you would normally expect to take two or three books, and the result doesn't quite gell - Picard seems overly generous in his acceptance of challenges to his authority on The Enterprise. Personally, after what the security team does to him on this voyage my first action would have been to throw them all off at the first Starbase. Oh yes, and somebody should tell Pocket Books that Picard the maverick always defying orders is getting boring.

I enjoyed it, and would recommend it to anyone. But after the qualified success of "Resistance" I was expecting this to be a 5 star blockbuster, so I was a little dissappointed when I could only give it 4. Maybe I just wanted too much.


Resistance (Star Trek)
Resistance (Star Trek)
by J. M. Dillard
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: £5.60

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Resistance is Futile - Thank Goodness, 2 Nov 2007
One of the better of the recent ST books, as it reads more like a plot for an onscreen adventure. And the Borg are back as pure baddies, which makes a welcome change from all the soppy Voyager nonsense where drones are becoming individuals and communing in cyberspace - for heaven's sake, the Borg are supposed to have been around for thousands of years and they haven't got over the issue of individuality yet? My only criticisms would be Crusher who, in this book, seems more than happy to come up with a method of neutralising the queen, and hence all the drones. This conflicts with the Beverley who argued so vociferously with Picard about introducing a virus into their programming on TV. Same effect, but this time she seems OK with it. Plus the method she finds to do it seems a bit odd squared against the hi-tech nature of the Borg. Other than that though, an enjoyable read.


Dearly Devoted Dexter
Dearly Devoted Dexter
by Jeffry P. Lindsay
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.99

8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dearly devoted to Dexter, 2 Oct 2007
This review is from: Dearly Devoted Dexter (Paperback)
Started reading the books after coming across the TV show, and got a pleasant surprise. The Dexter of the books is rather less sympathetic than on TV, and it works brilliantly. What is amazing is that once you get into the story you find yourself rooting for a killer and, although there is a little less humour in this one, you get to smile. In this book, Dexter is portrayed more accurately as the sociopath he is - his arrogance, his belief in his superiority to normal people, his blatant and cold using of Rita as a cover, and his disspassionate assessment of what advantages he can gain from the events of the story. Just can't wait to see how he manages married life.


The Tenderness of Wolves
The Tenderness of Wolves
by Stef Penney
Edition: Hardcover

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Evocative Reading, 25 Mar 2007
I was a bit leery of reading a book written about Canada by someone who has never been there, usually mistakes crop up, but I really liked it. It reminded me of winters in Canada when I was a child. She only made one mistake as near as I can see when one of her characters talks of having lived in Kitchener. Sorry but not possible in the 1800's, Kitchener was known as Berlin until 1916 when the name was patriotically changed during the war. A small point I know and it doesn't detract in any way from a wonderfully evocative book. Do read it and not just because it won a prize but because it is a good read.


Engines of Destiny (Star Trek: The Next Generation)
Engines of Destiny (Star Trek: The Next Generation)
by Gene DeWeese
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: £6.59

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Clever idea but...., 27 May 2005
It can always be a bit worrying when we get another book which tries to tie together Picard and Kirk, as there are already two versions out there - the movie "Generations" and the Reeves-Stevens' excellent "Federation". This one, set in Picard's timeframe but before "Generations", comes with a clever idea of Scotty being so wracked with guilt about Kirk's apparent death that he sets out to go back in time and save him. Unfortunately, this action causes, indirectly, a change in the timeline whereby the Borg attack which we see at the beginning of "First Contact" succeeds and the Borg then go back in time to conquer the Earth of 300 years earlier and the Galaxy becomes a very different place. It's up to Picard and Kirk to put things right and, in the process, ensure that they don't actually come across each other before their movie meeting.
Good idea, clever drawing together of several different themes. But the writing, while competent, is strangely flat and fails to bring out any personality in the characters. Some, like Riker, just don't have much to do, and Kirk is almost unrecognisable. In the hands of the Reeves-Stevens' this would probably have ripped along as a constant adrenalin rush, but here it never quite catches fire. And the ending is so obvious at a very early stage that when it arrives it is more a whimper than a bang.
There is an enjoyable book in here, but not the cracker that it could have been.


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