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Sports Fuel Premium Protein / Whey Powder Shake / Chocolate (1kg)
Sports Fuel Premium Protein / Whey Powder Shake / Chocolate (1kg)
Offered by Bodybuilding Warehouse
Price: £9.99

1.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely vile, undrinkable, 17 April 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Looks, smells and tastes like something not designed for human consumption. Any protein shake inevitably tastes at least a bit synthetic but this is truly repugnant. I couldn't bring myself to swallow more than two mouthfuls of it and had to rinse my mouth out immediately after. Cheap, yes, but still not worth a penny of it. If you're seeking affordable protein powder that tastes okay, I'd recommend this one: http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00I95ZWA6?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00


Rubik's Cube Rubik's Cube Light
Rubik's Cube Rubik's Cube Light
Offered by Pink Sumo
Price: £17.95

3.0 out of 5 stars Why a USB charger and not a mains adapter?, 18 Feb. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a fun piece of decoration for fans of kitsch pop-art memorabilia and whatnot; we purchased ours as a replacement for a broken lava lamp, and it's a fresh and unusual substitute. Obviously it's not a particularly practical light - you couldn't read by it or anything - but as casual mood lighting it's fine. The fact that it's fully playable also goes down well with the Rubik's Cube enthusiasts in the house, although they do end up with thoroughly aching hands owing to its size (haven't taken measurements but would guesstimate it's at least three times the size of a standard Rubik's Cube). My only real complaint is the fact that it stays lit up for only two hours at a time and can only be charged by hooking up to a computer with a USB, which makes very little sense to me; it's not like the thing requires software updates, so why should it need to be hooked up to a computer? If it could simply be plugged into the mains with an on-off switch like a standard lamp, and left on for an entire evening without feat of it losing power, then I would have been considerably happier. Of course, I see that there are other Rubik's Cube light options available at considerably higher prices (this cost me £16.99, and I see there are others in the vicinity of £30 and £60), and although I can't see from the item descriptions I would hope at least one of those would just plug into the mains.


Doomsday [Blu-ray] [Region Free]
Doomsday [Blu-ray] [Region Free]
Dvd ~ Rhona Mitra
Price: £6.49

18 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bloody good fun from a modern B-movie master, 28 July 2008
As a British male swiftly approaching 30, I know I'm not alone in getting a bit nostalgic now and then. Particularly when it comes to the movies. In an age where more and more action and horror films are being dished up to us neutered and sanitised - PG-13 'Terminator' and 'Die Hard' films, for God's sake! - I find myself more and more taking comfort in the full-on blood and guts fuelled classics of yesteryear. Ranking high among those are the films of John Carpenter, and George Miller's 'Mad Max' trilogy (or the first two at least.) And I'm certain I'm not the only one who had long been wishing that someone would come along and create a new movie in that 80's B-movie style.

Well, wish no longer. Neil Marshall has answered those prayers with 'Doomsday!'

And by gum, he's had a lot of mud flung at him for it. And the mudflingers really need to chill. Yes, the premise basically is 'Escape From New York' in Scotland, right down to the brooding synth score and the Atari-style graphics used to illustrate the walled-in zone. Even the same John Carpenter font is used for the opening credits! But it's not as if Marshall expects us not to notice this. At heart, `Doomsday' is doing the exact same thing that `Grindhouse' intended to do: evoke the spirit of a past age in cinema. And I dare say Marshall has done so far more successfully than Rodgriguez and Tarantino managed to. For as loaded as `Doomsday' is with knowing film geek references, it never gets all `nudge-nudge wink-wink' about it. There's humour, for sure, but never does it lapse into parody, not even when the music of the Fine Young Cannibals and Frankie Goes To Hollywood make an appearance.

Marshall made a decent first impression with the lightweight but likeable `Dog Soldiers,' and cemented himself as director of real power and vision with the awesome, truly scary `The Descent.' Here, while continuing his fascination with titles beginning in `D' (?!), he shows that he's far from a one-trick pony, staging numerous massive action sequences that squeeze in an impressive amount of bang-for-buck (the budget being I believe in the region of $30 million; his biggest to date, but small change by modern Hollywood standards). The script may be a bit patchy, sporting some dodgy dialogue and poor plotting, and some of the performances are a little lacking - in particular, sad to say, those from old pros Bob Hoskins and Malcolm McDowell. It's left to leading lady Rhona Mitra to catch the ball, and to my surprise she does so admirably. Step aside Alice and Lara - Eden Sinclair is the best action heroine we've had in years, and it's all down to Ms Mitra (though Adrian Lester provides solid support, and Marshall mainstay Craig Conway makes for a great psychotic nemesis). Far from being another embarrassing case of pretty girl trying to act tough - Denise Richards, anyone? - there's no doubt from her first moment on screen that Eden is not someone to be messed with, and when she kicks ass, you believe it.

But ass doesn't just get kicked in `Doomsday.' Oh no. It gets bludgeoned. It gets perforated. After all, why just cleanly stab someone when you can instead bloodily dismember and decapitate them? There's a big part of why this movie so much fun, and so reminiscent of the glory days of 80's action and horror - there's not a dry death in sight. And thankfully, little if any of it is that lame CG blood we're all growing sick of the sight of these days. Add to that a spot of great old school car chase action, and even a soupcon of swordplay, and you've got yourself just over an hour and half of blistering entertainment. Yes, of course it's a bit silly, and very, very, very derivative. But it's so much fun. It might not change anyone's life, but I really struggle to see how anyone couldn't at least have a good time. Naysayers be damned. Neil Marshall is here to stay. Bravo.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 28, 2011 12:36 PM BST


Doomsday [DVD]
Doomsday [DVD]
Dvd ~ Rhona Mitra
Price: £5.97

8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bloody good fun from a modern B-movie master, 28 July 2008
This review is from: Doomsday [DVD] (DVD)
As a British male swiftly approaching 30, I know I'm not alone in getting a bit nostalgic now and then. Particularly when it comes to the movies. In an age where more and more action and horror films are being dished up to us neutered and sanitised - PG-13 'Terminator' and 'Die Hard' films, for God's sake! - I find myself more and more taking comfort in the full-on blood and guts fuelled classics of yesteryear. Ranking high among those are the films of John Carpenter, and George Miller's 'Mad Max' trilogy (or the first two at least.) And I'm certain I'm not the only one who had long been wishing that someone would come along and create a new movie in that 80's B-movie style.

Well, wish no longer. Neil Marshall has answered those prayers with 'Doomsday!'

And by gum, he's had a lot of mud flung at him for it. And the mudflingers really need to chill. Yes, the premise basically is 'Escape From New York' in Scotland, right down to the brooding synth score and the Atari-style graphics used to illustrate the walled-in zone. Even the same John Carpenter font is used for the opening credits! But it's not as if Marshall expects us not to notice this. At heart, `Doomsday' is doing the exact same thing that `Grindhouse' intended to do: evoke the spirit of a past age in cinema. And I dare say Marshall has done so far more successfully than Rodgriguez and Tarantino managed to. For as loaded as `Doomsday' is with knowing film geek references, it never gets all `nudge-nudge wink-wink' about it. There's humour, for sure, but never does it lapse into parody, not even when the music of the Fine Young Cannibals and Frankie Goes To Hollywood make an appearance.

Marshall made a decent first impression with the lightweight but likeable `Dog Soldiers,' and cemented himself as director of real power and vision with the awesome, truly scary `The Descent.' Here, while continuing his fascination with titles beginning in `D' (?!), he shows that he's far from a one-trick pony, staging numerous massive action sequences that squeeze in an impressive amount of bang-for-buck (the budget being I believe in the region of $30 million; his biggest to date, but small change by modern Hollywood standards). The script may be a bit patchy, sporting some dodgy dialogue and poor plotting, and some of the performances are a little lacking - in particular, sad to say, those from old pros Bob Hoskins and Malcolm McDowell. It's left to leading lady Rhona Mitra to catch the ball, and to my surprise she does so admirably. Step aside Alice and Lara - Eden Sinclair is the best action heroine we've had in years, and it's all down to Ms Mitra (though Adrian Lester provides solid support, and Marshall mainstay Craig Conway makes for a great psychotic nemesis). Far from being another embarrassing case of pretty girl trying to act tough - Denise Richards, anyone? - there's no doubt from her first moment on screen that Eden is not someone to be messed with, and when she kicks ass, you believe it.

But ass doesn't just get kicked in `Doomsday.' Oh no. It gets bludgeoned. It gets perforated. After all, why just cleanly stab someone when you can instead bloodily dismember and decapitate them? There's a big part of why this movie so much fun, and so reminiscent of the glory days of 80's action and horror - there's not a dry death in sight. And thankfully, little if any of it is that lame CG blood we're all growing sick of the sight of these days. Add to that a spot of great old school car chase action, and even a soupcon of swordplay, and you've got yourself just over an hour and half of blistering entertainment. Yes, of course it's a bit silly, and very, very, very derivative. But it's so much fun. It might not change anyone's life, but I really struggle to see how anyone couldn't at least have a good time. Naysayers be damned. Neil Marshall is here to stay. Bravo.


Doomsday [DVD] [2008] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
Doomsday [DVD] [2008] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
Offered by passionFlix UK
Price: £4.37

10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bloody good fun from a modern B-movie master, 28 May 2008
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
As a British male swiftly approaching 30, I know I'm not alone in getting a bit nostalgic now and then. Particularly when it comes to the movies. In an age where more and more action and horror films are being dished up to us neutered and sanitised - PG-13 'Terminator' and 'Die Hard' films, for God's sake! - I find myself more and more taking comfort in the full-on blood and guts fuelled classics of yesteryear. Ranking high among those are the films of John Carpenter, and George Miller's 'Mad Max' trilogy (or the first two at least.) And I'm certain I'm not the only one who had long been wishing that someone would come along and create a new movie in that 80's B-movie style.

Well, wish no longer. Neil Marshall has answered those prayers with 'Doomsday!'

And by gum, he's had a lot of mud flung at him for it. And the mudflingers really need to chill. Yes, the premise basically is 'Escape From New York' in Scotland, right down to the brooding synth score and the Atari-style graphics used to illustrate the walled-in zone. Even the same John Carpenter font is used for the opening credits! But it's not as if Marshall expects us not to notice this. At heart, `Doomsday' is doing the exact same thing that `Grindhouse' intended to do: evoke the spirit of a past age in cinema. And I dare say Marshall has done so far more successfully than Rodgriguez and Tarantino managed to. For as loaded as `Doomsday' is with knowing film geek references, it never gets all `nudge-nudge wink-wink' about it. There's humour, for sure, but never does it lapse into parody, not even when the music of the Fine Young Cannibals and Frankie Goes To Hollywood make an appearance.

Marshall made a decent first impression with the lightweight but likeable `Dog Soldiers,' and cemented himself as director of real power and vision with the awesome, truly scary `The Descent.' Here, while continuing his fascination with titles beginning in `D' (?!), he shows that he's far from a one-trick pony, staging numerous massive action sequences that squeeze in an impressive amount of bang-for-buck (the budget being I believe in the region of $30 million; his biggest to date, but small change by modern Hollywood standards). The script may be a bit patchy, sporting some dodgy dialogue and poor plotting, and some of the performances are a little lacking - in particular, sad to say, those from old pros Bob Hoskins and Malcolm McDowell. It's left to leading lady Rhona Mitra to catch the ball, and to my surprise she does so admirably. Step aside Alice and Lara - Eden Sinclair is the best action heroine we've had in years, and it's all down to Ms Mitra (though Adrian Lester provides solid support, and Marshall mainstay Craig Conway makes for a great psychotic nemesis). Far from being another embarrassing case of pretty girl trying to act tough - Denise Richards, anyone? - there's no doubt from her first moment on screen that Eden is not someone to be messed with, and when she kicks ass, you believe it.

But ass doesn't just get kicked in `Doomsday.' Oh no. It gets bludgeoned. It gets perforated. After all, why just cleanly stab someone when you can instead bloodily dismember and decapitate them? There's a big part of why this movie so much fun, and so reminiscent of the glory days of 80's action and horror - there's not a dry death in sight. And thankfully, little if any of it is that lame CG blood we're all growing sick of the sight of these days. Add to that a spot of great old school car chase action, and even a soupcon of swordplay, and you've got yourself just over an hour and half of blistering entertainment. Yes, of course it's a bit silly, and very, very, very derivative. But it's so much fun. It might not change anyone's life, but I really struggle to see how anyone couldn't at least have a good time. Naysayers be damned. Neil Marshall is here to stay. Bravo.


The Long Last Call
The Long Last Call
by John Skipp
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Goes for the throat, 13 May 2008
I'm a bit ashamed to admit that I'm not all that familiar with John Skipp. I may have heard the name mentioned, but it wasn't until I'd read Brian Keene speaking so favourably of him that I really had any idea who he was at all. Keene himself comments in his introduction to this novel how inconcievable it is to him that he should be asked to introduce Skipp, as though Skipp needs any introduction. Well, I guess I'm living proof that he does, to a new generation of horror readers. And now that we've been introduced, I'm sure as hell going to make a point of tracking down some more of Mr Skipp's writing.

I've long been familiar with the term 'splatterpunk,' but never really known where it originated, nor to be candid was I 100% sure what it actually referred to. Now I know that back in the 80's Skipp was one of the prime movers and shakers of this subgenre. And as the moniker suggests, it's fiction that casts aside concerns about good taste, manners and literary convention in favour of a balls-out visceral approach, attacking normality, attacking modesty. In short, it ain't for prudes. But if 'The Long Last Call' is a good representation of this, I've certainly got the stomach for more.

As befits the 'punk' element, it's a refreshingly short novel - so short in fact that Leisure have included in this edition a bonus novella, 'Conscience' (which at the time of writing I have yet to read). Dropping us straight into the action as closing time approaches in a sleazy roadside strip club, the whole narrative takes place over the course of at most an hour. Skipp cleverly stays within this timeframe by showing each moment from the perspective of each character; a device which in less capable hands may have felt clumsy, but here succeeds in making the action all the more compelling. From the moment that the Dark Stranger appears, the dread really starts to build... but Skipp's no M Night Shyamalan. This isn't all atmosphere, no gory payoff. Oh no. When the splatter comes, it's splashing off the walls.

Comparisons to 'Evil Dead' and 'From Dusk Till Dawn' are not only inevitable, but appropriate; after all, Skipp originally wrote the story as a screenplay, and all being well the novel may eventually lead to the movie being made. I certainly hope so, because 'The Long Last Call' would make for a truly insane horror film. But if it doesn't, never mind. It's all right here in this novel, a novel which no real gorehound can afford to miss. Highly recommended.


Hack / Slash Omnibus
Hack / Slash Omnibus
by Stefano Caselli
Edition: Paperback

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Calling all slasher fans!, 14 April 2008
This review is from: Hack / Slash Omnibus (Paperback)
Hear ye, hear ye, all you slasher movie fans out there, bemoaning the lack of any great dice-em-up body count movies in recent years (well, since 'Freddy Vs Jason' at least, in my humble opinion); if you haven't already, it's time to turn to the wonderful world of comics for your fix. 'Nightmare on Elm Street' and 'Friday the 13th' both recently kicked off fairly decent runs with Wildstorm comics, as well as 'Texas Chainsaw Massacre' and 'Child's Play' (having not read the latter two, I couldn't comment on their quality). The best four-colour slash action of all, though, comes courtesy of 'Hack/Slash.' Following on where the likes of Haddonfield's Laurie Strode, Springwood's Nancy Thompson and - in particular - Sunnydale's Buffy Summers left off, please welcome the latest heroine of horror: Cassie Hack, hunter and killer of 'slashers' (here finally distinguished as a breed of monster in their own right). Together with her hulking sidekick Vlad, she travels from place to place investigating supernatural serial killers, never leaving without kicking some ass and taking some names.

Comparisons with 'Buffy' are hard to avoid, but Cassie is no carbon copy of the Slayer. She's foul-mouthed and hard-hitting/kicking in a way that network TV would never allow. Her goth/punk dress sense and deep-set neuroses make her perhaps that bit easier for the average teen horror fan to relate to; her eye-popping fantasy female physique may sometimes feel a little odds with this, but hey, speaking as a shallow male I'm not about to complain.

This anthology collects the whole run so far, as already featured in the collections 'First Cut,' 'Death By Sequel' and 'Friday the 31st' - i.e., if like me you've already got those, don't bother buying this, as there's nothing new. But for if you're new to 'Hack/Slash,' this is the place to start. With the comic series now ongoing, and a movie adaptation in the works, we're sure to be seeing a hell of a lot more of Ms Hack in the future. And, to use a particularly silly horror-related quip, I say - 'the gore the merrier!'

Heheh... don't worry, Tim Seeley writes better jokes than I do.


League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: The Black Dossier
League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: The Black Dossier
by Kevin O'neill
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A challenge for the reader - or a chore...?, 10 April 2008
I'll keep this short, as RA Monk has pretty much summed up exactly how I feel about this book. I didn't dislike it as such, but I was massively frustrated by it. It's a ridiculous self-indulgence on the part of Moore and O'Neill - and I say that as someone who loved 'From Hell' and the entire run of 'Promethea.' What I loved about the first two 'League' books was, while they are overflowing with literary and historical references, at heart they're just great, straightfoward adventure stories that everyone can relate to. With 'The Black Dossier,' if you don't get the reference points, you're up the proverbial creek.

As always, Moore's writing is alive with his drive to challenge his readers and push forward the boundaries of comic books, and fiction in general. I wouldn't have it any other way; it's that attitude that has made him the legend he rightly is today. But 'The Black Dossier' may be a bridge too far. Recommended for completists only.


Money Shot (Hard Case Crime (Paperback)) (Hard Case Crime (Mass Market Paperback))
Money Shot (Hard Case Crime (Paperback)) (Hard Case Crime (Mass Market Paperback))
by Christa Faust
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A writer to watch, 28 Feb. 2008
Having read most of Christa Faust's novels thus far, one frame of reference keeps coming to mind - and I'm not entirely sure whether the author wouldn't take this as a compliment... Christa Faust novels are like episodes of 'Charlie's Angels.' You think about how every episode of that show went: someone came into the office with some mystery or other that needed fixing, and it invariably lead to the Angels going undercover in some bizarre, exotic location or industry: the circus, beauty paegents, fashion modelling, stunt driving, prison - the list goes on. And the central mystery, while not without consequence, was always by and large secondary to seeing the Angels trying their hand at something new and exciting, in a wide variety of tasty fantasy costumes. That's almost exactly how Ms Faust's novels work: they introduce the reader to some new, exciting world via some good old-fashioned detective action. Of course, unlike 'Charlie's Angels,' Ms Faust is not only unafraid but downright eager to get more than a bit dark, gritty and dirty, which is clear from her choices of subject matter alone. In 'Control Freak' it was the rubber-clad world of the dominatrix; in 'Hoodtown' it was a Lucha Libre fantasia. In 'Money Shot,' it's a world that perhaps more can identify with: the porno industry.

What I love about Ms Faust's writing is the lack of pretence. After all, the first thing of hers I read was her 'Friday the 13th' tie-in novel, 'The Jason Strain.' Intellectualism, while certainly not absent, is not at the forefront. She's not out to write the great American novel; she just wants to show the reader a good time. Her prose is fluidly readable and dripping with wit, her content shamelessly titilating, pumping out plenty of sex and violence, while still finding time to carve a good story and flesh out endearing (or, as here with Jesse Black and co, thoroughly despicable) characters. Angel Dare is another great, tough female protagonist, the kind of heroines which the author will hopefully come to be renowned for.

Ms Faust has grown with every novel; this is her sharpest, tightest read yet. I have no doubt that her output will only get better. But don't take my word for it, pick this up, and be sure to seek out 'Control Freak' and 'Hoodtown' too, even though they're a bit harder to find. Trust me, this is a writer with some great stories to tell, and 'Money Shot' is a great example of this.


Malena [DVD]
Malena [DVD]
Dvd ~ Monica Bellucci
Offered by SweetBuzzards
Price: £6.99

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful, 15 Feb. 2008
This review is from: Malena [DVD] (DVD)
Anyone who's seen 'Citizen Kane' remembers the wonderful speech given by an elderly man reflecting on the memory from his youth of seeing a woman in a white dress; though she never saw him, and they never spoke, he remembered her for the rest of his life. Essentially, 'Malena' is that story writ large.

This may well turn out to be Monica Bellucci's signature role. Not only did this film launch her as a leading lady to international audiences, but it also confronts head-on the manner in which she, and countless other beauties of stage and screen, have been and continue to be treated by the world: lusted after, resented, and finally broken down. Some have condemned 'Malena' as voyeuristic, objectifying the leading lady; but this film is really a comment on objectification and voyeurism, a poignant tale about how a woman's looks result in her being ostracised by her community. As it is all told from the perspective of a twelve-year old boy, understandably infatuated, it's also a touching coming of age story; and it's all played out against the backdrop of fascist-ruled Sicily in the late days of the Second World War. That's a lot to squeeze into eighty-odd minutes.

Like any truly great film, 'Malena' takes the viewer through a myriad of emotions. It's hilariously funny, showing us the awkwardness of puberty and the protagonist's generally absurd fantasies involving the object of his lust. It's very sexy, the camera truly loving every inch of the impossibly gorgeous Ms Bellucci. It's tense and disturbing, the shadow of war constantly threatening to break the tranquility of the picturesque town. And it's harrowing to see how the town's gossip about Malena escalates into suspicion, contempt, and ultimately persecution.

All in all, 'Malena' is simply beautiful. Perhaps it falls back a little too often on chocolate box visuals of the idyllic, sunkissed Sicillian coast, but then this is a tale told by a man looking back on his youth, a period of our lives that - in spite of whatever hardships are endured - we all tend to look back on through rose-tinted glasses. It captures wonderfully the bittersweet longing of adolescent infatuation, in a refreshingly frank and honest manner. Indeed, too frank and honest for some it seems, as reputedly this version (as previously mentioned, less than an hour and a half long) has been cut by over fifteen minutes, excising material which was deemed to have pushed the boundaries of voyeurism and sexual fantasy a little too far; to the best of my knowledge there is no uncut version yet available in the UK or US, annoyingly. For this reason alone I have held off purchasing this DVD, in the hope that the uncut version may eventually be released. But even at a shorter running time, 'Malena' is a must-see film to be cherished. Anyone who has ever loved someone who didn't even know they existed will have something to relate to.


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