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SEIKI SE39UY01UK 39-Inch 4K Ultra HD LED TV with Freeview
SEIKI SE39UY01UK 39-Inch 4K Ultra HD LED TV with Freeview
Price: £229.99

0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Quality, 11 Dec. 2014
I won't go into the specifics because they are detailed on the product page, but what I will say is that this is an excellent TV with quality sound and crystal clear images. Whether your passion is sport, movies or gaming this TV brings the action into your living room. I think you would be hard pushed to find a better TV in this price bracket and, as an all round package, it merits five stars.


Wolf in the Shadows (A Sharon Mccone Mystery)
Wolf in the Shadows (A Sharon Mccone Mystery)
Price: £4.99

5.0 out of 5 stars A Class Act, 3 Dec. 2014
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About fifteen years ago I read a short story by Marcia Muller in The Mammoth Book of Private Eye Stories and that prompted me to read Trophies and Dead Things. Although I enjoyed that novel my reading tastes at the time took me in a different direction and I didn't pursue the rest of the series. However, now that I am writing private detective stories of my own I decided to revisit the genre and Marcia Muller's Sharon McCone came to mind, and what a wonderful rediscovery. I selected Wolf in the Shadows at random and while it is not the best place to start, the book does offer a fascinating story, which is beautifully crafted. But the highlight for me is Sharon McCone herself. She is a three dimensional character and you believe in her from the start. As the narrator she carries the story and she does this with some style and humanity. Marcia Muller and Sharon McCone are class acts and although they are very popular they are deserving of a wider readership. Mansel Jones, author of Blind Justice and Making Movies.


The Godwulf Manuscript (A Spenser Mystery) (Spenser series Book 1)
The Godwulf Manuscript (A Spenser Mystery) (Spenser series Book 1)
Price: £4.74

4.0 out of 5 stars The Godwulf Manuscript, 7 Jun. 2014
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The Godwulf Manuscript is the first story in the thirty-nine book Spenser series. As with most first books in a long-running series, The Godwulf Manuscript finds the author searching for a narrative voice and writing style. If you read this book and the second book in the series, God Save the Child, back to back, you will notice a slight difference in the narration and in Spenser's character. However, with God Save the Child Robert B. Parker was well into his stride and Spenser's character developed consistently from that point on.

The Godwulf Manuscript is set in a university. Robert B. Parker was a Professor of English, so obviously he was familiar with this background. The plot centres on the theft of a fourteenth-century illuminated manuscript and that theft leads to organised crime, dope-pushing, radical politics and murder.

Spenser's narration is one of the best in private detective literature with a nice line in self-deprecating humour. The character is also a romantic, though in this story he is footloose and fancy-free and has brief affairs with a number of women.

Robert B. Parker went on to write with more style and to craft more interesting stories. Nevertheless, this is an important book in the Spenser canon because it reveals the genesis of the character and introduces a number of other characters who became cornerstones of the series.

Mansel Jones, author of Blind Justice Blind Justice: A Max Gwyther Mystery


The Golden Rendezvous
The Golden Rendezvous
by Alistair MacLean
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

4.0 out of 5 stars The Golden Rendezvous, 7 Jun. 2014
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This review is from: The Golden Rendezvous (Paperback)
Alistair MacLean has his detractors, and you can understand why; some people claim that his characters are `one-dimensional', especially the female characters, and because a story develops from the characters his stories must be one-dimensional as well. Hmm. Maybe. Over his career Alistair MacLean established himself as one of the leading authors of popular fiction, so he must have done something right, and The Golden Rendezvous offers an example of why he remains so popular.

The Golden Rendezvous was written in 1962 and the story taps into the prevalent fear of the time - nuclear weapons. The plot centres on the disappearance of a nuclear weapon and a series of mysterious events aboard the s.s. Campari. Along with ice-bound landscapes, the sea is one of MacLean's strongest locations and he draws you into the sailor's world with descriptive ease. The s.s Campari is hijacked, murder and mayhem ensue and it is left to Chief Officer Johnny Carter to rescue the situation. Carter is a typical MacLean hero - an `ordinary' man with an `ordinary' name performing extraordinary deeds. Carter is a likeable narrator and the reader empathises with him as he struggles against the odds.

The s.s. Campari offers a closed environment and therefore a limited cast of characters, which can be an advantage in a crime/mystery/adventure novel. The passengers aboard the s.s. Campari are multi-millionaires and MacLean has fun at their expense as Carter and the splenetic captain, Bullen, do their best to avoid them.

I would place The Golden Rendezvous in the mid-range of Alistair MacLean novels, which makes it a highly enjoyable read.

Mansel Jones, author of Blind Justice Blind Justice: A Max Gwyther Mystery


The First Borough of Kenfig 1147-1439
The First Borough of Kenfig 1147-1439
by Barrie Griffiths
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent book, 15 Sept. 2011
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In `The First Borough of Kenfig' by Barrie Griffiths the author places medieval Kenfig in a wider social and political context. Meticulously researched the book offers a fresh insight into Kenfig's rich medieval history and the author is not afraid to present his theories on controversial subjects such as the course of the Roman road, when the town was abandoned and whether or not the town had a port. The reader may not always agree with the theories put forward, but those theories are never less than thought-provoking and stimulating.

Barrie Griffiths has written a number of booklets on various aspects of Kenfig's history and `The First Borough of Kenfig' promises to be the first book in a landmark series about the borough. A book that will be read and referred to for years to come. Mansel Jones, author of Tangwstyl and A History of Kenfig


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