Profile for G.A. Austin > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by G.A. Austin
Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,971,231
Helpful Votes: 0

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
G.A. Austin

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Me and Earl and the Dying Girl (Top Ten Best Fiction for Young Adults)
Me and Earl and the Dying Girl (Top Ten Best Fiction for Young Adults)
by Jesse Andrews
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £11.08

2.0 out of 5 stars The Unfunny Side of Comedy, 29 Jan. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Greg was once friends with Rachel. Rachel now has leukaemia. Greg's Mom says he has to talk with Rachel again. So he does with his best friend Earl. He doesn't like any of this, but Greg really doesn't have a choice in the matter as Rachel is dying.
I don't have a lot to say about this book other than I simply didn't get it. Yeah, if I was younger, I might have thought it was okay. But I'm not younger, so I don't think this book is okay. The humour was beyond cheesy and I simply didn't get how the narrator, Greg was always saying things like "this is probably the worst book ever". These comments sum up the book in that this book really has no idea why it exists.


The Sleeper and the Spindle
The Sleeper and the Spindle
by Neil Gaiman
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £9.09

4.0 out of 5 stars Creepingly Beautiful, 29 Jan. 2015
A beautiful maiden sleeps in a high tower far away, guarded by roses and watched over by an old woman. But the sleep spell is spilling out of her kingdom and into lands far off. News of this reaches the ears of a powerful worrier queen who, with the help of her companion dwarfs, set off to break the powerful curse and bring down the evil behind it.
Combining a mix of classic fairy tales and adding it's own twist, this creepy story about a powerful spell of sleep taking over a magical land is blended with beautiful artwork and gripping story telling. Truly nothing like it I've ever read.


The Unbecoming of Mara Dyer (Mara Dyer 1)
The Unbecoming of Mara Dyer (Mara Dyer 1)
by Michelle Hodkin
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.59

4.0 out of 5 stars Oh Boy, What a Read!, 25 Nov. 2014
Mara Dyer was once a normal highschool girl until she wakes up in a hospital and finds out she was in an accident that killed her best friend Rachel, her boyfriend Jude and Judes sister, Clair. Afterwards, Mara and her family decide to move to a completely new locasion to start a new life turns out to make everything worst. She then starts halucinating, seeing her dead friends faces and seeing crumbling buildings. Then Mara starts prodicting deaths and she starts thinking that she really has gone insane. But when Noah Shaw shows up in her life, things only seem to get crazier . . .

I don't know where to begin with this book. The book feels like one strange dream that doesn't seem to really be happening, but is by no means less enteratining. In fact, that's what kept me going with this book, the fact it was so enteratining. There were times when I did have to put the book down because I thought the next part would be too scary for me to read and my mind would be blown once I finnished it; which it did!
I liked Mara as a character but I wouldn't be sure if I would like her if I met her in real life. She's also a very unrealiable narrator; being that she halucinates so half the time you don't understand what is going on or even if its real. But as a narrator, she takes you along with her and the way Michelle Hodkins has written that kind of voice it pulls you in and makes you even think that the halucinations are happening to you right now as you read it.
I really liked Noah - the love interest of this story. I thought when Noah was present in the book, Mara seemed to be a bit more sure of what was going on and the story seemed to be in a happier tone. He was a very light hearted character and a great relief to me when he came into the book. I didn't buy the idea that he was a womanizer and I still am kind of confused with how this bad-boy image come into this idea of a nice supportive love interest and I kind of don't get how they played together.
What I didn't like about the book what the end (not going to spoil anything here). The plot-twist at the end of it was kind of sudden and confusing and even a little bit unreal, but I guess I'm being picky. I thought it was a little bit pushed and I guess I wanted a more satisying way to conclued it but I can't really see how it could have ended any otehr way. I also would have liked it if (and this is a big if) if teh book was told from gthe point of view of Noah - but that's just me.

Overall, I really enjoyed it and it blew my mind. It has a really good feeling, if very creepy, and I couldn't help siding with Mara since she was such a great character.


The Bell Jar
The Bell Jar
by Sylvia Plath
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £9.61

4.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully Written, but Hard to Understand, 3 Aug. 2014
This review is from: The Bell Jar (Hardcover)
Esther Greenwood has spent a quiet peacful life in the area of Bosten and now, as a prise, she and a dozen or so other girls get to stay in the glits and glamour of New York City, treated on tasty food, staying in luxurious hotel rooms and trying to improve their experiences and their future carers. Esther should be having the time of her life, but by the end, she is sleep-deprived, disinterested in activities, can't eat or read properly and eventurally turns suicidal.

It is very hard to explain why this book is good because A) it's a very depressing book in which it features suicides, mental illness and details on injeries, B) it was writen by a woman who comitted suicide and C) not a lot happens. In fact, nealy all of this book is about this one grumpy girl who can't have a good time in New York. But it isn't really about what happens to the character physically - it's about what happens to her mentally. As the book goes on, you can see her mind is detererating and no one is really noticing it. The language, the structure, the complexity of the writing and Esther Greenwood's charcter is what draws you in so that by the end you feel as if you read about a poor girl who needed to take it as far as to try and kill herself for anyone to actually understand what kind of help she needed.
Some say that The Bell Jar is semi-autobiographical for Plath. In the book, Esther wants to be a poet; Plath was a poet. Esther's father died when she was around the age of nine; same with Plath's. Esther's suicide attempt was taking a large dose of sleeping pills; Plath's took her mothers pills underneith their house as her first suicide attempt. In this, The Bell Jar is in some ways going into Sylvia Plath's mind and understanding what she might have been feeling - we'll never know for sure, but we can guess.
I found the character of Esther to be quite entertaining to read about and I liked picturing her as she ate fancy food and took hot baths and swam out into the sea. But the fact that, especally in teh second half of the book, she starts to induldge in describing the "thrill of injery" and how she savourded those moments and it was kind of scary to read about how someone's mind goes in a way that it becomes all about hurt, death and pain.

This book is definatly not a light read and not for people with dificulties of reading about suicidal characters or mentally unstable characters, but it is definatly, without a doubt, a beautiful work of literature in which you can tell that the writer was born to be a poet.


Will Grayson, Will Grayson
Will Grayson, Will Grayson
by John Green
Edition: Paperback
Price: £3.85

3.0 out of 5 stars Let there be laughs!, 3 Aug. 2014
One night, in the city of Chicargo, Will Greyson walks into a store and meets . . . Will Greyson! Two boys, same age, same name, but with completely different lives. One being depressed and unsocial, the other being friendly and charismatic, and after their first meeting, all the rules that they maked for themselves starts to be broken.

I'd never read a book both first person and dule P.O.V. Each chapter switches from one Will Greyson to the other. John Green and David Leuithan make a point of making contrast in the two voices by their writing styles. With the Will that I call Will Greyson No.1 (since he has the first chapter), he write in the present tence, using quotation marks, while Will Greyson No.2 (since he has the second chapter) write conversasions in the form of a play without using quotation marks and seperating it into paragraphs. An interesting note is the W.G No.2 doesn't use capitals at the beginning of his sentences.
I found it interesting to read and I found heart-warming moments in it, but for the most part I found some of it a little cheesey, a bit rushed and a little bit (dare I say it) sloppy. I didn't understand right away why it would be about two Will Greysons since - in total - they only talk to each other up top a maximum of three times. The two Will Greysons don't interact and I was surprised about how little they were involved in each others lives and even when it came to a conclusion as to why it was important, I kind of thought it was a little bit too fanastical and unrealistic.
I thought all the characters were very fleshed out, they felt fairly realistic to me, although I thought that the character of Tiny Cooper was a bit overpowering which kind of didn't make me like the story that much since he really is what binds this stpry and conects the two Will Greysons. Going into it, I thought that the two Will Greysons would have nothing in commo, but it ends up that they both share this avoidence of people and a dislike for company which changes as the book goes on.
The sence of humour in this book is where it really shines and where I can really realate to the characters. It's also made me interested in David Leuithan's writing to see if he has this same sence of sacastic humour in his books. I found some of the couple moments in this book very cute and kind of reminded me of other John Green books - mostly Looking For Alaska.

Nobody dies, nobody gets cancer and nobody has supernatural/paranormal experiences, so if you are either trying out David Leuithan or John Green books, this book is a good starting point.


More Than This
More Than This
by Patrick Ness
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £7.94

4.0 out of 5 stars What. IS. GOING. ON HERE?!, 23 Jun. 2014
This review is from: More Than This (Hardcover)
Seth drowns in a small town off the coast of Washington, America. He is alone and unloved when he hits his head against the rocks and falls into the blackness of death. He dies. Moment's later, he wakes up in his home town in England, still alone, but alive! What is he doing here? Why is he here? And - above all else - what is he doing still breathing, still alive? This story deals with life, death, the end, the beginning and everything in-between as Seth asks himself is life and living . . . More Than This?

I have never read a Patrick Ness book before I read More Than This and I don't know if he does this in all his books, but I think this form of writing style is very effective in that it somehow creates this more creepy effect to the book in putting it all in present tense motion and doesn't every stop (i.e. "he says", "she says"). I liked how he has used this style to set us firmly in what is happening here and now. The story itself is best going in knowing next to nothing about what's going on, but I have to say that there were plenty of moments where I was screaming "Oh My God!", especially at the end. Literally, I sat there, just after I'd finished the book and just screamed out "Oh, My God!" (lucky, no one was there). There were moments in the book where Seth would kind of get flash-backs at his life before hand and that's how we get to know most of the other characters in Seth's life, which I thought were very interesting and kind of added to the environment of the plot. There is quite a lot of swearing and there is mansions of homosexuality, if that's an issue with some people. And this really shouldn't be a surprise, but this book dose feature heavily about dying young, suicide and child-abuse, if that end up being a problem for some people. I am trying to keep this spoiler free, and I kind of want this to be a sort of "going in blind" experience for any readers who happen to stumble on this stupid comment. So I am not going to mention all of the characters (even though there are plenty to talk about). Seth, I thought, was kind of the character who you completely sympathised with, but at the same time you kind of got annoyed with since he was kind of a selfish character to begin with; I loved the character growth that he goes threw throughout the story. I thought that, to be honest, I thought his parent's were brutal in how they treated him - his Dad basically ignoring him and his Mum being so angry at him all the time - and that only added to the sympathy you felt for Seth and almost none for the parents (except maybe the Dad, sometimes). Owen, his little brother, when considering how big an impact he's had on Seth's life, was not really there for most of the book and was kind of "the elephant in the room" kind of figure throughout the book. I thought Seth's friends - H, Monica and Gudmund - were all very unique and different kind of characters than the ones you normally get in books. I didn't have a specific moment in the book that I liked the most but I did like it when re-lives some of memories and especially liked it where it was describing a fairly happy moment in Seth's life. I also liked the parts where Seth is re-remembering English phrases instead of American such as when he refers to a "yard" as a "garden" and I thought that was a clever understanding of language.

Unlike anything I've read before (and that's not a lot) More Than This dark, plain and simple, but with plenty of surprises and suspense as it's the story about living and dying and what people want out of both.


The Lunar Chronicles (Book 3) : Cress
The Lunar Chronicles (Book 3) : Cress
by Marissa Meyer
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.59

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I'm Lovin' It!, 5 Jun. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The third book in the Lunar Chronicles series. Cress (short for Crescent) is a seventeen-year-old girl who for seven years of her life been trapped in a satellite hacking codes and computer systems for the Lunar Queen and has been a prisoner for the rest. Hardly daring to hope that she has any chance of escape, Cress does the dirty work for the royals of Lunar, tracking, covering and de-coding. But from the crew of this one ship comes a response. They are coming to rescue her, so now she gets to travel all the way down to Earth for the first time in her life with the man she has grown to love threw stalking and background information- Captain Thorne - as Cinder, Scarlett, Kai and Wolf all need her help to take down the evil Queen Levana.

Over my time reading about this world, I have grown to love it. Although it is still hard for me to picture some of the items, objects, transport and even some of the people in this series, but I'm getting used to the idea of it and it kind of reminds me of a cleaner, slicker version of Star-Wars. I really liked how we got to travel a bit more and saw how the whole world is not taken over by futuristic setting and technology. I kind of wanted to see a bit more of Cress's satellite and what it was like in there, because the book didn't spend too long in there and I was really looking forward to seeing 'Rapunzel's tower', if you know what I mean. I thought that being named the title of the book, Cress wasn't there that much, but I understand that this is not really just about her but about the people and the plot that's going on around her and how she plays a part in it; I thought she had a very small personality compared with the other characters, but that didn't make me love her any less since she was so sweet and understanding towards everyone and really smart too and I think she's my favourite out of Cinder, her and Scarlett in that she has a lot more award moments and is socially impaired compared with the others, making her more relatable. I mentioned this before but I love Thorne as a character, him being the real joker of the whole crew; we saw, a few times in 'Scarlett', that Thorne can be kind, caring and understanding behind his almost hateful selfishness and arrogance, but this side of him really comes out in 'Cress' and I love how he is kind of letting that arrogant side of him go down a little, showing how he's actually a really nice person underneath. I though Cinder in this one was aw-some, seriously; she was the leader, she had powers, she had skills and she was also pretty funny. About 80% of the time, I got annoyed with Kai, even thought I thought he had some of the best character development moments; he always did the worst decisions and - even though you can understand why - everything inside you screams at you to not marry that retched queen! I thought Wolf was really al lot more sweet and gentle in this book but by all means is still as tough as nails and there are a few times when he has really scary moments when you think he might hit someone; but I thought he was really sweet when he was with Scarlett (in the little time he was with Scarlett). I thought Scarlett was a lot more likable in 'Cress' and I could really see how Cinder and Scarlett could become really good friends. I am still in love with Iko as a character and I really liked how Iko built a relationship with Cress even though Cress is so shy. I think I liked all the sections where Cress and Thorne were pretty much alone together, but I think my favourite one is when Cress explains to Thorne how her life has been up until this point and what it was like when she was a child. But I think my very favourite moment in 'Cress' was right at the end, the last section from Cress's point of view in the ship where Thorne and Cress talk about destiny and about themselves and other things like that. I also liked it when Thorne's first comment on seeing Cress is "is that all hair?" (very funny!). I think that my favourite couple - out of the three we've seen so far - is a thigh between Scarlett and Wold or Cress and Throne and personally I think they are more interesting than Cinder and Kai. I also feel like there's this thing going on with Cinder and Thorne in that they have some kind of a love-hate relationship where it is mostly Cinder who does the hating. I did like how the book ends and it leaves us with us being able to go get up to Lunar and go get Princess Winter.

Great plot, great characters, I cried near the end and I have fallen in love with everything about this series! I just can't wait to find out what happens next in Winter!


Scarlet (Lunar Chronicles, Book 2)
Scarlet (Lunar Chronicles, Book 2)
by Marissa Meyer
Edition: Paperback
Price: £3.49

4.0 out of 5 stars Better and Better!, 29 May 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The sequel to Cinder in the "Lunar Chronicles" series. Scarlett lives in France in a quiet country farm with her Grandmother. Her Mother abandoned her and her father slowly did the same. Her grandmother is all Scarlett has left in the world, so is mortified when she is kidnapped and the police close her case. Then along comes Wolf, a street-fighter, who claims to want to help Scarlett but seems to have some mysterious link to the disappearance of her beloved Grandma. Meanwhile, Cinder, now the most famous and most wanted fugitive in both Lunar and the Eastern Commonwealth is off on a travel to find the sole hair of the Lunar throne with Captain Thorne, a devilishly handsome but slightly arrogant pirate, as her reluctant assistant. These two unlikely stories combine in their quest to end the reign of the evil Queen Levana.

I thought, going into this book, I was spoilt for everything that was to happen. Thankfully I wasn't. There were still many twists and turns and laughs and delights as I continued on in this incredible series with 'Scarlett'. I loved how it was set in different places at and I liked how it was set in different time sets. I have, by now, become accustomed to the world and I love how everything is was tided up together at the end. I did find it a bit frustrating in that the two main girls (Cinder and Scarlett) Don't meet until the very end of the book and how we don't ever get to meet Grandma until the end of the book either since - in Scarlett's time-line - she was the main focus of the story. I thought it was clever the way Meyer has done her story by taking two seemingly completely separate stories and building them towards the end to combine them together. The whole concept of The Plague was not really as strong as it was Cinder - in that it was mentioned once or twice but there seemed to be no involvement of The Plague. I loved how this series continued with the old character's you have grown to love but introducing new characters who also grow in fondness. I thought that Scarlett, as a character, was a lot more interesting than Cinder in that she is far more impulsive and single minded than Cinder; although loyal and true, Scarlett is a lot more wild in that she doesn't think things threw and doesn't bother to try and understand things fully and doesn't try and see things from other people's point of view as well as not really thinking about the other people around her when it comes to their thoughts, feelings, or even safety. I found Wolf, Scarlett's love interest, way more interesting than Kai; with Kai, you know he's the male hero of the story, even if he does seemingly wrong things, because you can see why he has to do it - with Wolf, you don't know if he's good, if he's bad, if he's on their side or if he even has a side, which makes him more interesting and more exiting to read about since he is not the classic hero or a classic double-crosser. Cinder, in this one, was far better, in character development; she does more, she's more in control in what she feels she should do and it doesn't hurt that she gets a new cyborg hand and foot (the hand being particularly cool). Kai was a lot distant in this one and I didn't see that as a bad thing since he seems to still be a very big part in the story-line. I loved that Iko is back in the picture and I love having her back in the story. I fell in love with Captain Thorne (although I keep thinking his name as 'Throne' instead of 'Thorne', at times) and am looking forward to see more of him. I see Scarlett's Grandma as an older and more wiser version of Scarlett - the woman that I am sure she will become in time. I found Wolf and Scarlett's love story much more interesting than Kai and Cinder's - probably because I completely get the whole 'Love you, but afraid of you' thing. My favourite part was when it's reviled to us that Wolf doesn't know what a tomato is or what a carrot is and he asks Scarlett about it - I think it shows an interesting side to Wolf's character. I also loved the part at the end when Wolf saves Scarlett's life by killing a man and he tells her he's about to kill her as well, but I found it moving when she told him about how he was not afraid of him and how he's not like the others (no spoilers!).

Overall, I did loved Scarlett, but not enough so that I could confirm with Five Stars. There were times were I was a little annoyed at how the characters seemed to be spinning around in circles, not going anywhere, and I found that Scarlett was too much of a scattered character (one moment she loves him, the next she can't stands him, but then she loves him again etc.). Did I like Scarlett more than Cinder? Yes, definitely. Did I like it enough to give it Five Stars? No. Was it nearly Five Stars? Absolutely. I'm just not sure if I could give it Five Stars when this series is still in the making. I've got Cress, ready to be read, so I am looking forward in seeing what new and exiting characters come out of it.


Warm Bodies
Warm Bodies
by Isaac Marion
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Handsome Zombie is about to eat girl but loves her instead . . . What. The. Heck., 22 May 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Warm Bodies (Paperback)
R is a Zombie. I slow-walking, man-eating, black-blooded Zombie who lives at an abandoned airport with over a dozen or so other Zombies. But he is also the narrator and threw his mind we find that he has what no Zombie ever in the history of the media has ever had before; emotions. He feels hurt, curiosity, pain and most of all guilt. But his lack ambitions, hopes or dreams keeps them stuck in this separated area between the living and the dead. All he stride towards is what kind of meat he can catch and what life he can take. But when R eats the memories of a boy named Perry, a girl named Julie comes into his mind and when R looks in the room, she's sitting right in front of her. In a sudden violent jerk of change and emotion, R rescues Julie, keeping her in at his home in an old jet, spending the time playing old records, giving her Pad Tai to eat and listening as she begins to pore her heart out to him and R slowly begins to change.

In this book, everything bad that could have happened, happened - the dead are rising, all the food's going down, everything's in drought or in a flood etc. - and humanity is not hiding wherever they can and, in this area, even in stadiums. I know about The Walking Dead - both the video game and the TV program - and I can honestly say that I see nothing about those Zombies and the Zombies in this book. Most of these Zombies are emotionless, nameless and brainless, but some of them seem to have an idea of what's going on around them and how things are changing and some of them want to be a part of it. I liked the idea about how that when a Zombie eats the brains of a living person they sort of absorb the memories of that person so they have a sort of vision of that person's life. I found the Bony's - those skeleton-like creatures that are basically in charge of this whole thing - to be really creepy and I really liked having them there as some sort of opposition besides the humans (sorry, Living, as R calls them). There is quite a lot of gore in this book, but I managed to gloss over or skip some of those parts and still get the general idea about it, but I do think that if you don't like gore that this might not be suitable for you. I've seen the trailer for the Warm Bodies movie and R doesn't look how he's described in the book. In the movie, R is dressed like a teenager - red hoody, grey T-shirt, jeans - while in the book, R is described as wearing a red tie and a (used to be white) grey shirt and is supposed to be dressed like a business man, so you get the general idea that R is supposed to be around about early to mid twenties, at the least, so I found that kind of hard to picture since my picture of R kept going back and forth between the two images. I thought that the world in which this was set in was really cool (wouldn't want to be there though) and I liked how the story was written in this "present tense" mode where he describes everything as if he's there in that moment - I thought that was a really good writing style for this kind of a story. R is my favourite leading male protagonist in any book I have read so far; he's funny, he's sweet, he's kind, (he can rip you to shreds but that's okay), he's thoughtful and hopeful and I just cannot put it into worlds how much he makes me smile both as a character and as a narrator. Julie is awesome and I love how she's not too much of a miserable character or that she's got no reason to do dangerous things in that she has a reason; she's not a damsel in distress, she's feisty and she can take care of herself pretty well and I love how she doesn't fall in love with R straight away (him being a Zombie and all) and I kind of like her resistance towards R. M is really funny and I find the fact that he can't remember the rest of his name but can remember how and when to say f*** or s***; I like how he's R's friend and how he, unlike other Zombies, actually helps and seems to care about R and I like it when R calls out for M's help and he comes. Nora was a fun, but kind of forgettable character, but I like how she response well to R when she first meets him. Perry was annoying; I found that sometimes I just wanted him to go away sooner and it kind of came to the point where I was screaming at the book 'Why are you even here, Perry?'; I understand that Perry, and his memories, are important in the book, but I didn't get why he had to be such a big part and why it sometimes snapped over to some of his memories - though I did find it both funny and cool at the part where he breaks threw and talks to R as a person. I didn't, at some points, why Julie's Dad was there to be anything else but an annoyance and something to get in between Julie and R (not spoiling anything here!); however, I do feel sorry for him in that he's a man who simply wants to survive. I think R and Julie have, by far, one of the best romantic relationships ever; there's something Beauty and the Beast about it where they're not sure about each other at first but then form a small team by the end of the book. One of my favourite parts of the book was the first time Julie hugs R - she's grossed out and a bit repulsed by the hug at first, but then she gives in and hugs him like a normal person. Some parts of this book are very deep and meaningful in which it questions about life and death and humanity and how what it takes to be human.

Sweet, fun and kind of horrifying, I'm not even sure what category this book is set in. It has action, romance, horror and a slight twinge of humour sprinkled in; I could barely put it down.


The Lunar Chronicles: Cinder: 1
The Lunar Chronicles: Cinder: 1
by Marissa Meyer
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.24

4.0 out of 5 stars Needs Some Getting Used To., 22 May 2014
Cinder is a gifted mechanic living in New Beijing, in the Eastern Commonwealth. She lives with her adopted step-mother, Adri, and her two daughters. However she is shunned and isolated and mistreated by Adri, Perl and all the other shop-keepers on the account of her dreadful secrete; she's a cyborg. Half girl, half machine, Cinder is an outcast to society, with her only true friends being Peony, Adri's youngest daughter, and Iko, a little robotic android with a big personality. After the Emperor of the Eastern Empire's son, Prince Kai, approaches Cinder at her booth, Cinder's world is turned upside down and inside out as she discovers she might be one of the last hopes for not only her country, but planet Earth itself as it is threatened by the evil Moon People (Luna's) and their evil queen.

I really liked the sound of this story when I first heard about it, but it took me four times before I became comfortable reading it. The world and the idea of it comes across to me as a bit freaky and a bit weird, but I began to warm up to it, not only because of the cool technology there was, but because of the characters in the story. I was disappointed that I found it so easy to get at the main plot-twist of the story and it was part of the reason why I didn't like this book at first. The characters in the story really were the thing that kept me reading this book and, by the time I started Scarlett, I fell in love with the world they're in (I want a space-ship!). I loved Iko and her quirky personality. Cinder herself was awesome and funny and I found that she was a very believable character. Kai was a kind-hearted, sensible character but who I found to be slightly naïve in an annoying fashion; I didn't find his joke or comments that funny and I didn't really like to pay attention to when it switched over to Kai's point of view (or POV). Adri and Perl were just annoying and narrow-minded, blaming Cinder for everything that went on in their lives and punishing her - and Iko - for it; I wish they'd just broaden their view a little and stop telling Cinder that she has no emotions or feelings and that she's not human. I found the Doctor as kind of like a father figure to Cinder and I hope that sort of thing continues throughout the series. The love story that goes on between Cinder and Kai, I found was way too fast for me; it was too impossible and too improbable for me, in that they meet up three times and then they kiss (and not in the lovely, understanding, simplistic Disney style, before you can go there!) and I found it hard to understand why he would care about her in such a short space of time with so much against them in that he knows she's a mechanic and he's a prince, so they can't be together. I found Peony a sweet bubbly character, but I didn't find myself crying even once when she ended up how she ended up (not spoiling anything here!); I found her kind of hard to relate in that she would have probably been brought up her whole life to hate cyborgs and to hate Cinder, and the fact that she doesn't annoys me a little, but I'm pleased as well and I do find myself upset when considering how much she means to Cinder and how young she is. I think one of my favourite parts of the book is when Kai and Cinder meet and Kai is giving Cinder and android to repair and she just gives it a hit over the head and pushes the "on" button; nothing happens and her comment is "You'd be surprised how often that works" (Haha!). The moment's I really loved about the book when there are references to the original fairy-tale story such as when Iko comments on how the car Cinder has been admiring at is like a "rotten pumpkin" and when Cinder falls down the palace steps and her foot comes off in the proses and Kai goes over and picks it up and holds it in his hands after she's gone. I understand how the series might thigh in together (not spoiling anything here!) but I'm kind of left wondering how Scarlett (the main character in the second book) is linked to any of this. Scarlett is evidently a re-telling of "Little Red Riding Hood", so I'm wondering - is her Grandmother involved with the government and if so, how does it involve Scarlett? Is Wolf her link to all this? How? I'm hoping that Scarlett (the book) proves to me that Marissa Meyer isn't going to make this whole idea of obvious plot-twists, like she did in Cinder and I hope that's the same with Cress. Speaking of Cress, Cress is the third book and is the story of Rapunzel and Rapunzel is by far one of my favourite re-telling's so far. I was spoiled for one of the aspects of it, but I won't say what that is, but I'm interested in seeing how that thighs in with the whole Luna Queen thing and I'm pleased to say I still have a few more questions left for Cress. I have plenty and plenty of questions for Winter and I hope that it stays that way.

Love the covers; love the character's and I'm starting to love the world - this is such a unique take on the fairy-tale re-telling, and I hope there will be more soon enough.


Page: 1