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Tempestas (England, UK)

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Future Ritual: Magick for the 21st Century
Future Ritual: Magick for the 21st Century
by Philip H. Farber
Edition: Paperback

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Could be the teacher you've been waiting for....., 22 Feb. 2010
There aren't many books on magick that can lead a beginner sensibly from complete novice to the performance of the Star Ruby and the Star Sapphire, but this is one of them.

Farber has only one agenda : magick that works. And magick that makes sense to a modern 21st century student. In this slim volume you get practical advice on how to prepare yourself for ritual, what to expect and why, what to discard and what to keep, and a series of excercises that, used properly, will prepare you for the more advance rituals laid out in the appendixes.

You won't be bogged down by supposedly ancient mumbo-jumbo, or the need to accept a particular magical philosophy or set of god forms. And, best of all, you won't have to pay anyone a large sum of money to "teach you".

You will need to work. In magic there are no free lunches. But every journey starts with the first step, they say, and buying this book could be yours.


The Lucifer Code
The Lucifer Code
by Michael Cordy
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: £7.99

1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Don't waste your money....., 15 Feb. 2010
Apparently the Daily Mirror thinks Cordy is Britain's answer to Micheal Crichton....from which I can only assume that either the reviewer hasn't actually read the book or he/she hasn't read Crichton, or maybe both.

I think the plot, set a little way into the future, concerns trying to capture the soul as a hologram at the moment of death ..... I say "think" because I couldn't be bothered to struggle with the dull writing and one dimensional characters for very long before giving up.

Does this invalidate my review? No, it doesn't. Ever heard that one about not having to eat the whole egg to know it's bad? If you have a brain, enjoy a good read and like something with a fantasy sci-fi element .... don't waste your time and/or money on The Lucifer Code.


Revelation [2002] [DVD]
Revelation [2002] [DVD]
Dvd ~ James D'Arcy
Offered by Entertainment Direct
Price: £5.98

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Good idea - mediocre film, 9 Oct. 2009
This review is from: Revelation [2002] [DVD] (DVD)
The search for mystical artifact, an evil secret society with a nice line in torture, a lot of occult and mysterious references, plus some impressive thespian names ..... this really should have been an enjoyable "da Vinci Code" romp.

But something went wrong somewhere, and all we have is a muddle, with an uninspiring script and a predictable story line. The scenery changes, and the occasional gruesome bits, might just about keep you watching to the end if you've nothing else to do before going to bed. Or you might just find yourself yawning earlier than you expected instead.


Magick of Aleister Crowley: A Handbook of Rituals of Thelema
Magick of Aleister Crowley: A Handbook of Rituals of Thelema
by Lon Milo DuQuette
Edition: Paperback
Price: £16.99

26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Curious about Crowley....?, 27 July 2009
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
If you already know something about ritual magick but you're still looking for a path, and you're curious about the Great Beast and all his Works, this is probably the very best book to start with. Lon Milo du Quette is a Thelemite of many years experience. He writes clearly and in detail about Crowley's magical system, how the rituals (all given here) should be performed and what they mean. And - wow - unusually for a ritual magician, he has a sense of humour too. (Happily more accessible than Crowley's!)

Crowley has been dismissed as over-complicated, verbose, or just barking mad. He was - and in many ways still is - way ahead of his time. His magic has a pattern and logic all of its own, but it isn't for dabblers. There is enough information in this book to occupy an aspirant for years.

If you want to be a Thelemite, this should be in your library.


Tarot: A New Hdbk for the Apprentice, Classic Ed: 1 (Connolly Tarot)
Tarot: A New Hdbk for the Apprentice, Classic Ed: 1 (Connolly Tarot)
by Eileen Connolly
Edition: Paperback
Price: £17.99

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Old.......and not all that good., 17 Jun. 2009
This a thirty year old book (originally written in 1979), and its age shows. It should also have the word "Christian" in front of "Apprentice".

Well over half consists of Connolly's interpretation of the cards, including some bad rhyming couplets to (hopefully) aid your memory and a lot of worthless stuff about astrology, gnothology(!) and a bit of Hebrew.

There are a couple of messy and badly drawn charts and some meditations that might make you cringe : "I thank Thee, heavenly Father, for all Thy wondrous gifts ... for my home, and all my humble possessions..." etc. etc.

The Tarot, and magick in general, has come a long way since the seventies. Modern students might find Connolly's approach condescending. "Much as I would like to take take you further into Astrology, Gnothology and the Cabalistic correspondence of the Tarot I do not feel it wise to do so at this stage...." But, the student might well complain, I thought this was supposed to be "the Complete Handbook"?

There are more insightful, more modern, less religious, and better produced handbooks on the market. Avoid this one.


99th Monkey, The: A Spiritual Journalist's Misadventures with Gurus, Messiahs, Sex, Psychadelics, and Consciousness-raising Experiments
99th Monkey, The: A Spiritual Journalist's Misadventures with Gurus, Messiahs, Sex, Psychadelics, and Consciousness-raising Experiments
by Eliezer Sobel
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Informative and fun, 20 April 2009
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a roller-coaster ride through a multitude of spiritual and new-age options. Sobel is an ideal guide, witty and intelligent, and with the added qualification of not having a personal axe to grind.

Clearly rich enough not have to earn a living he has been able to spend a lot of time trying to "find himself". Willing to give almost anything a try he doesn't rubbish anything and is honest enough to admit when a "living god" leaves him cold, a guru might actually have human faults or a drug based religion causes him to vomit all day.

At the end of the book he seems to be still searching for answers (aren't we all?) although probably less frantically.

This is fun and funny, educational and eye opening, very honest and well worth reading!


Omm Sety's Egypt: A Story of Ancient Mysteries, Secret Lives, and the Lost History of the Pharaohs
Omm Sety's Egypt: A Story of Ancient Mysteries, Secret Lives, and the Lost History of the Pharaohs
by Hanny El Zeini
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.13

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating on many levels, 31 Mar. 2009
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is the story of Dorothy Eady, a strong willed, intelligent English eccentric (born in 1904) who develped a fascination for Ancient Egypt at a very young age. Later she married an Egyptian, went to Egypt, and had a son. Later still she abandoned both her marriage and her son and -- believing she was the reincarnation of a Egyptian temple priestess who committed suicide when her sexual liason with the Pharaoh Sety I was about to be discovered -- spent the rest of her long life helping Egyptologists, and secretly continuing her affair with the long dead Egyptian monarch.

If she had been a feather brained female who thought it was romantic and fun to flirt with ancient history, Dorothy Eady's story would be far less interesting. But from all accounts, apart from convincing herself that a dead Pharaoh visited her at night, she was level headed, independent and clever enough (despite having no academic training) to be a great help to many Egyptologists.

Omm Sety (it means Mother of Sety, Sety being the name she gave her son) made no money from her bizarre belief, and gained no publicity. She only shared her secret with a few trusted friends, late in her life. Most people simply saw an interesting English woman who fed numerous cats, and was willing to guide them round the temple site at Abydos. But it's obvious from the detailed diary that she kept (much of it reproduced in this book) that Sety I (she called him HM - His Majesty)was as real to her as the tourists and archeologists that she met every day.

Omm Sety enjoyed very few luxuries and in later years, despite being in dire financial straits, refused help from her son and his family. She was, to the end, stubborn and strong willed .... and her belief in HM's "reality" never wavered.

Unfortunately her descriptions of her liasons with Sety read like Mills and Boon - perhaps she was unconsciously detailing the kind of romantic affair that she wished she could have had? But even if you believe (as I do) that Dorothy Eady was suffering for some kind of psychological disorder that produced hallucinations, or trances, or whatever, this book is still a fascinating read.

If you really believe in reincarnation, you'll find it a delightful validation.


What You Call Time: A Practical Guide to Modern Witchcraft and Ritual Magic
What You Call Time: A Practical Guide to Modern Witchcraft and Ritual Magic
by Suzanne Ruthven
Edition: Paperback

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars B+ for effort, 3 Feb. 2009
There are no rituals laid out here, the "practical" in the sub-title refers to advice.

It comes both from the author and (one feels) her circle of friends. It's mostly good, common sense stuff, aimed at magical beginners, mainly those interested it witchcraft : no, you don't have to sleep with a "high priest" to become a real witch (are there really people who believe this?); no, you don't have to pay lots of money for ritual equipment - make-do and adapt; only do what feels right for you, not what others may tell you, even if they've awarded themselves fancy titles and claim ancient lineage ..... that sort of thing.

The book is about ten years old now, and a lot of water has passed under the magical bridges since 1998, but this is still a non-fluffy read, put together by those who sound as if they practise what they preach and don't seem to have any personal agendas to sell.

The odd title? It's a piece of contemporaray Japanese music, and nothing to do with magic or witchcraft at all.


The Golden Dawn: An Account of the Teachings, Rites and Ceremonies of the Order of the Golden Dawn (Llewellyn's Golden Dawn series)
The Golden Dawn: An Account of the Teachings, Rites and Ceremonies of the Order of the Golden Dawn (Llewellyn's Golden Dawn series)
by Israel Regardie
Edition: Paperback

12 of 17 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Heavy stuff......, 28 Jan. 2009
....both the book itself and the contents.

It's incredibly wordy and much of it has (as reviewer Steven Allen points out) been rejected by modern magicians. If you ever manage to read it all you're either very dedicated, or you have too much time on your hands. If you actually use it all.....well, get a life!

The mystically and magically inclined Victorians didn't have our numerous resources. For them the Golden Dawn must have seemed like a mysterious and exciting portal, beckoning them into a secret world. Learning the Hebrew alphabet probably sounded like the first step into the Great Unknown.

But now we have the Net. We have a vast selection of (not always good) books. We have (hopefully) discovered more effective ways of spending our magical time than indulging in the GD's antiquated and verbose rituals.

If you really feel attracted to this system, try Liam Christopher or John Michael Greer. They have streamlined it for modern usage. Christopher uses Regardie as a text book, but you don't have to. You can easily dispense with Regardie's padding.

Two stars for historical interest, but if you really want to step into the 21st century, try Jason Augustus Newcombe or Philip H Farber.


Practical Magic for Beginners: Techniques and Rituals to Focus Magical Energy (For Beginners (Llewellyn's))
Practical Magic for Beginners: Techniques and Rituals to Focus Magical Energy (For Beginners (Llewellyn's))
by Brandy Williams
Edition: Paperback
Price: £13.50

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars For fluffy bunnies only!, 22 Jan. 2009
The rituals say it all, really -- Get a new job now! Need money now! Find a house! Emotional healing! A new love!

It's safe, new-agey stuff for people who want to do a little candle lighting and incense burning. Visualise a pentagram? Oooh, we're doing magic!

Not recommended for serious students, beginners or otherwise. Don't waste your time on this unless you wear floaty chiffon and talk to the fairies.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 25, 2012 10:32 PM BST


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