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Mr. R. Long
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D-Link DSR-250N Wireless N Unified Services Router
D-Link DSR-250N Wireless N Unified Services Router
Price: £148.79

1.0 out of 5 stars I've had this router since June and have been trying ..., 10 Oct. 2014
I've had this router since June and have been trying to get its faults fixed by D-Link tech support for four months now.

Basically the internet is totally unreliable. Sort-of-OK some of the time, glitching, slow and disconnecting the rest of the time.

Tech support are bloody hopeless, they've been outsourced to some other company who can't help you and don't know anything.

Engineers are all based in the far east so if you want them to dial in to your router to see why their product is such an appalling failure you have to have everything set up for them between 6am and 1pm UK Time.

Nobody to call in the UK. Nobody who understands the problem. Nobody who cares.

Well, no more D-Link for me.


I, Robot (Two Discs) [DVD]
I, Robot (Two Discs) [DVD]
Dvd ~ Will Smith
Offered by SKYETORI
Price: £2.99

0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Godawful shash., 27 Sept. 2012
This review is from: I, Robot (Two Discs) [DVD] (DVD)
I've seen 'I Robot' (or as I prefer to think of it 'Why Robot') twice - once at the cinema on release, where I stumbled out feeling violated, and once at home on TV when I decided to see whether I had been overly melodramatic at the cinema. I hadn't.

It's just possible that if Asimov could see the uses to which his magnificent work was put by Will Smith, he'd set fire to the script before publication. The only thing this film shares with the book is the title, and that's one thing too many.

Will Smith plays a merchandising opportunity, who doubles as a maverick cop in his spare time when he's not shopping for antique Converse trainers (vintage 2004) or driving around in his Audi car. Things explode, as they didn't in the book. People balance on ledges, just like they didn't in the book. Robots come alive in their hundreds of thousands and subject humanity to slavery, just like they didn't in the book. Bad robots helpfully have a bright red glowing light on them to identify them as bad, which makes it easy for Will Smith to shoot them or kick them in his antique Converse trainers (vintage 2004). The book's careful and intricate analysis of the nature of humanity and what it means to be self-aware is stamped up and down on by Will Smith in his antique Converse trainers (vintage 2004). It's only a mercy the film doesn't end with him rapping - or does it? I really can't remember.

For pity's sakes, don't buy this. If you must watch Will Smith in something, make it something in which he gets permanently hurt.


An Utterly Impartial History of Britain: (or 2000 Years Of Upper Class Idiots In Charge)
An Utterly Impartial History of Britain: (or 2000 Years Of Upper Class Idiots In Charge)
by John O'Farrell
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Hilarious from certain points of the political spectrum., 17 Nov. 2009
If you really do subscribe to the Marxist view of history, as O'Farrell does, then I'm sure you'll find this desperately funny, with gags about Thatcher (ooh, so evil). If you wanted something to laugh at and don't come from that particular perspective, then you may find yourself wondering what the other reviewers were on about. I certainly did. O'Farrell has wit, certainly, but it's wit of the kind we can get plenty of elsewhere from the likes of Marcus Brigstocke and practically any Radio 4 comedian.

Two stars instead of one because he really is trying, just as he is trying with his spoof news website NewsBiscuit. Just as The Daily Mash is far better than Newsbiscuit, there's plenty of other stuff that's funnier than this book.


Homo Britannicus: The Incredible Story of Human Life in Britain
Homo Britannicus: The Incredible Story of Human Life in Britain
by Chris Stringer
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.98

21 of 34 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars What happened at the end?, 21 Dec. 2008
I was very happy with the Homo Britannicus until the final chapter. All of a sudden, it stops being about prehistory and becomes yet another tiresome rant about global warming. If I wanted to be hectored about the evils of coal then I'd be reading Jonathon Porritt, George Monbiot or any other colossally wealthy enviromentalist.

If Chris Stringer wanted to write about the environment, then where are the dendrochronoligical discussions in his book, talking about the wholesale deforestation of Britain during the Neolithic and early Bronze ages? What about megafaunal extinction? Why skip 6,000 years?

Whilst the rest of the book is good, the last chapter sours the whole experience.


The Day Of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy 1943-44 (Liberation Trilogy)
The Day Of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy 1943-44 (Liberation Trilogy)
by Rick Atkinson
Edition: Hardcover

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Pretty good., 22 Jan. 2008
I bought Rick Atkinson's "An Army at Dawn" (which follows the North African campaign from Operation Torch to Tunis) and, like many people, have been eagerly awaiting his newest book which covers Sicily and Italy.

The book rumbles from one end of Italy to the other, following the campaign in detail, with clear maps and some excellent photos. It being primarily a book about the American fighting in Italy, non-American units are sidelined in that the level of detail devoted to them is far less. Atkinson's writing style is at times florid but he never fails to point out the brutality, the humanity and the sacrifice.

There are minor errors scattered through the book, which an editor with a comprehensive knowledge of WW2 would have picked up. These include incorrect designations for weapons or vehicles or wrong calibre sizes for artillery. They aren't anything more than a niggle, but they are there.

The biggest weakness of the book, though, and the reason I gave it 4 instead of 5 stars, is that Atkinson has a Montgomery axe to grind, and grind it he does. He contrasts him unfavourably with Mark Clark, and in my opinion glosses over Clark's numerous faults.

Yes, we all know Monty was a pompous, overbearing, arrogant man. Atkinson's criticisms of him, though, imply that he was a poor general, which he was not. Atkinson objects to Montgomery's refusal to risk casualties, which is exactly the reason his men loved him - they knew he would not risk their lives without a good reason.

Atkinson does, however, gloss over Mark Clark's failings, which include his almost incessant self-promotion, his lack of strategic vision and his unhealthy opinion of the fighting strength of the British and French. Clark's extraordinary disregard for casualties is also not emphasised enough, in my opinion.

If you can ignore the at times excessive bleating about Monty and the occasional fawning over the much-overrated Clark, this is a superb book, broad, deep and thoroughly researched.
Comment Comments (6) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 27, 2013 1:46 PM GMT


How To Be Right: The Essential Guide to Making Lefty Liberals History
How To Be Right: The Essential Guide to Making Lefty Liberals History
by James Delingpole
Edition: Paperback

20 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Truly Stonking, 20 Mar. 2007
This book is an epiphany. It articulates the way so many of us feel - the downtrodden middle classes, tired of endless New Labour spin and tired of policy being dictated by a handful of urban lefties at dinner parties. Worth buying, worth reading again and again, and worth beating pompous socialists over the head with.


Net Nanny 5 (Education Version) (PC)
Net Nanny 5 (Education Version) (PC)

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars If you hate your computer, buy it this software to make it sad., 27 Feb. 2007
I've installed Net Nanny on a range of different computers over the last few years. I have to say that it is the most unreliable, ropey piece of cobbled-together junk software I have ever used. It crashes, there are errors which need fixing every month or two, the interface looks like it came from Windows 3.1, it causes so many conflicts and blue screens and it is badly dated in the way it monitors internet viewing and the way it deals with it.

Avoid.


Battlefield 1942: The WWII Anthology (PC CD)
Battlefield 1942: The WWII Anthology (PC CD)
Offered by Game Trade Online
Price: £6.84

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Flawed fun until you get a good mod, 14 Dec. 2006
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
A friend bought this for me so we could game online. It's pretty good. LAN multiplay is far better - being in the same room and shouting orders or warnings to each other brings the game to life. However, it got cold within a week or two. I went looking for a realism mod and with the Forgotten Hope updates I'm still playing it 9 months later. They resolve most of the serious realism issues and improve the gameplay no end.


Roast Chicken and Other Stories: A Recipe Book
Roast Chicken and Other Stories: A Recipe Book
by Simon Hopkinson
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.88

8 of 13 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Too much ego and snobbery mars an otherwise above average cookbook., 9 Oct. 2006
Like many others, I bought this book based on a newspaper recommendation, something I won't do again. Yes, some of the recipes are good but Hopkinson is of the generation that believes that only foreigners do food properly. Yes, Simon, they do, if you cherry-pick where you go. A great deal of French and Italian cooking is just as average as basic cooking in Britain.

What puts me off more than anything, though, is the dinner-party braying that Hopkinson slips in to every now and then. He forgets that the book's supposed to be about cookery and becomes an eating snob.

There's a particular part which I remember, where he insists that the only way to eat a particular Italian cheese is in a particular town in Italy with a special knife. A special knife to eat a particular cheese? It's this kind of thing put me off the book.

I was disappointed. It's still on my shelf but I think I've looked at it once in 2 years. I use my Leith and my Elizabeth David books all the time.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 25, 2011 4:43 PM BST


Motorola HS820 Bluetooth Wireless Headset
Motorola HS820 Bluetooth Wireless Headset

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Good concept, shocking reliability, 19 April 2006
I've now had two of these devices in 18 months. The first failed after 9 months - wouldn't charge. The second has now failed - keeps disconnecting from the phone, and the volume button has broken.

Steer clear.


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