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G Marwaha (UK)

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JBL Creature III 2.1 Desktop Speaker System - Black
JBL Creature III 2.1 Desktop Speaker System - Black
Offered by home AV direct
Price: £62.90

7 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Broke down after a week, 27 Sep 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Probably just my set of speakers, but they ended up working intermittently after only a week. The cables had to be bent and stuck in a certain configuration to work. Sometimes the speakers failed to work. Odd given that there were no problems with headphones and my old speakers.

In terms of the speakers themselves, the sub is very large compared with the satellite speakers and a rather unwieldy shape. If you've got a small desk then you'll struggle to get your computer, screen and these speakers on it. If you've got a long desk, then you won't have a problem.

Cables are either too short (satellite speakers to sub cables and power lead) or way too long (sub to computer jack). It means you can't place the satellites too far from the sub, but the sub has to be very close to a power socket. It simply restricts where you can place them.

Shame really. Product has been returned to Amazon and I'm looking at alternatives.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Dec 6, 2012 7:47 PM GMT


Modern-Tech Multi-Function Standard Red PU Leather Case for Apple iPad
Modern-Tech Multi-Function Standard Red PU Leather Case for Apple iPad
Offered by Modern-Tech
Price: £18.95

5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect for iPad, 26 Sep 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Will keep this short: iPad fits in the case very well. Case offers a reasonable level of protection, comfortable in the hand, offers access to all buttons and the power port, and the cover means my iPad doesn't collect dust when not in use. Highly recommend.


Snugg Black Leather iPad 1 Case with Lifetime Guarantee - Flip Stand Cover with Protective Premium Nubuck Fibre Interior for the Apple iPad 1
Snugg Black Leather iPad 1 Case with Lifetime Guarantee - Flip Stand Cover with Protective Premium Nubuck Fibre Interior for the Apple iPad 1
Offered by TheSnugg
Price: £57.98

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect for iPad, 26 Sep 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Will keep this short: iPad fits in the case very well. Case offers a reasonable level of protection, comfortable in the hand, offers access to all buttons and the power port, and the cover means my iPad doesn't collect dust when not in use. Highly recommend.


No Title Available

5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Big clock, but expensive for what it is, 26 Sep 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Bought this because I'm short-sighted and wanted to have a clock that I could see at night (in the event I wake up) and could see without straining.

Pros:

1] It's big. Dimensions aren't given on Amazon, but I emailed the Discovery Store and someone responded very quickly. 25cm wide, 9cm high and 5cm deep

2] It looks nice from a distance.

3] Adjustable brightness switch so the digits don't glare in the night.

4] Mains operated with battery back up.

Cons:

1] Quality - it's made of cheap plastic. I would go as far as to say it feels cheap and nasty.

2] Expensive - it's not worth £25.

3] You can't turn off the "seconds" digits - so they are constantly changing. That gets slightly annoying as you can see the movement through the corner of your eyes when you're not looking at the clock.

4] The digits are composed of small squares - I think the traditional "lines" that make up digital clock digits would have looked nicer.

Overall, not bad, but definitely not worth £25. It feels more like something you could pick up for £10.

UPDATE: March 2011:

Every time the clock detects motion, it goes into the time-temp-date-alarm cycle. It's become annoying and there should be a button to switch it off and just leave it on time mode.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 24, 2010 4:07 PM BST


Six Pixels Of Separation: Everyone is Connected, Connect Your Business to Everyone
Six Pixels Of Separation: Everyone is Connected, Connect Your Business to Everyone
by Mitch Joel
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.99

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing book - most of the info is available for free on the Internet, 25 Sep 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The premise of this book is that individuals and businesses will benefit greatly from tapping into the wealth of social media channels that are now available.

As someone who works in digital marketing, branding and communications, I took a punt on this book given how important these strategies are going to be with the explosion of social media. It's the second book I've bought on the subject, the other being Groundswell: Winning in a World Transformed by Social Technologies (which I picked up in a Borders store for next to nothing before it shut down). I've been left hugely disappointed by both books, and more so by Six Pixels. There is nothing new in the book, which covers the usual tools such as blogs (the author loves these), videos (You Tube), viral marketing, connecting and conversing via the internet, etc etc.

And this, for me, was the biggest issue I had with this book: what the author has written about isn't new and has no details - social media tools and channels are being used all the time. And if you want to read/learn about them, you're better off looking them up on the Internet. The book gives the impression it's going to cover some ground breaking techniques, but ends up "sounding" like a bad salesman selling timeshares.

The author makes it sound that by following everything he says in the book (from setting up a plethora of social media tools to holding impromptu conferences/exhibitions) you'll have a brand and a reputation that will rival Coca Cola and Apple. The reality is, people and businesses don't have time to run multiple social media channels (and then monitor and evaluate them) AND respond to every customer/blogger/critic/commentator that writes about their products/services - unless, of course you either (a) have a large marketing team around you, or (b) write a digital marketing blog (like the author). Taking time to set everything (social media channels) up and then being able to manage them are critical to both individuals and business - something not covered in this book.

Other flaws in the book include:

1] From start to finish, hardly a page goes by when the author doesn't mention the name of his book, his business (it's on the cover for a start), or his blog. Given he's a marketer, I've put this down to sheer blatant self-promotion. It became very annoying to read "at [insert blog/business name] I see......"

2] The book is geared more for the North American market than the British/European ones. I can say this with some confidence given that I've spent a lot of time in America and Canada. The language, the style, the format are all geared for a North American market. Also, some of the suggestions and advice provided aren't techniques that would work particularly well in Europe - must there be a blog about everything? Do we really need to connect with every single person that comments about us/our companies?

3] The book could be a third of the size if the author hadn't waffled on for so long.

4] The examples of success stories are (strangely) North American and are all the same. "Person sets up blog, person connects with people, person/business is a hit". Again, very little detail to the processes behind the success.

5] It's odd in places: do we really need to know that we should always record thoughts and ideas on a notebook??? The book does lurch from social media in a business setting to social media for individuals.

So, overall, would I recommend this book? No. You can find everything that is written in this book online - type social media strategies/social media tools/social media channels into any decent search engine and you'll be presented with hundreds of blogs and sites that go through everything that was covered in this book - for free! Try the Mashable and/or The Wall Blog websites.


Wenger/Swissgear GA-7306-06F00 Pegasus 17 Inch Notebook Backpack
Wenger/Swissgear GA-7306-06F00 Pegasus 17 Inch Notebook Backpack
Price: £55.05

5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect for a 17" laptop, 17 Sep 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Great bag. Easily carries my 17" laptop and there's loads of pockets for cables, mouse, external drive and everything else you'd need to carry with your computer.
Bag is sturdy and secure and everything inside is well-protected and cushioned. Highly recommend.


The Art of Looking Sideways
The Art of Looking Sideways
by Alan Fletcher
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £20.37

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb, 17 Sep 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I can't add much more than what other reviewers have already said. If you're interested in design, graphics, advertising, marketing, communications, then buy this book. It's got more ideas and inspiration between the covers than you could shake a stick at. It's also going to take some serious space on your bookshelf - not so much a book, more of a weighty tome. You won't be disappointed.


Advertising: New Techniques for Visual Seduction
Advertising: New Techniques for Visual Seduction
by Uwe Stoklossa
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £29.62

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Insightful and inspirational, 17 Sep 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
In short, a wonderful book showcasing some excellent campaigns and full of inspirational ideas. Good quality paper helps the graphics come to life and there is just the right amount of accompanying text. Well worth the money.


Bonfire Of The Brands: How I Learnt to Live Without Labels
Bonfire Of The Brands: How I Learnt to Live Without Labels
by Neil Boorman
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not worth the money, 17 Sep 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Mildly interesting to start with (first 20 pages) after which, this book became progressively dull and pointless. You'd think there would be something interesting about burning everything branded that you own, but the author takes readers on a tortuous journey through his demons - which are: "I spend too much money on designer goods" and "I need help with my spending addiction". Nothing in there about consumerism and the effects brands have on us.

Rubbish book, wish I hadn't bought it.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 8, 2012 12:56 PM BST


Wally Olins. On B®and.
Wally Olins. On B®and.
by Wally Olins
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.36

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Jack of all trades, master of none - and slightly drab, 13 Sep 2010
I suspect my review will have no influence on fans of Mr Olins. If you're after a quick summary of my thoughts, I think there are better books available that discuss brand (The Brand Gap and Zag written by Marty Neumeier; and Olins' The Brand Handbook).

That Wally Olins is master of brand is not in question - he knows his subject and is incredibly insightful. However, I don't think this is one of his better books for the simple reason that he tries to cover too much on branding and the history of branding and, therefore, consequently, the book never thoroughly covers all topics. Had the book been longer, then perhaps this probably wouldn't have been an issue.

I personally found the book heavy going (almost drab) in some areas and written almost in the style of an academic text book, which I don't think the book set out to do. The case studies are long and in some cases aren't case studies but an overview of, specific industries; for example, cars, with little detail on "brand".

The twelve chapters cover an array on topics such as why brands are important; brands on a global stage; where brands came from; and how to create and sustain a brand. As I mentioned earlier, none go into too much detail and I was left at the end of many chapters feeling frustrated and thinking "so what?" You're almost willing Olins to write more. Just when a chapter begins to get interesting, it ends.

There are a couple of areas whose inclusion I did find odd: Made In (which looks at brands associated with particular nations) and branding the nation (discussing brands as national key assets). These two chapters in particular demonstrated to me why the book falls short - you can't cover these in little over 30 pages; they need dedicated books. Their inclusion felt almost like an after-thought.

One of the reviewers here has mentioned that the book does not go into detail on Web 2.0 and "lack[s] in understanding and vision of current developments" - the book was written in 2003 and potential buyers need to factor that into account. You certainly won't see anything in here on the impact of social media on branding.

Overall, I've learnt little for the price of the book. The most interesting chapter "How to create and sustain a brand" would have been better had it be longer and gone into more details. If you're after a snapshot overview of branding in a quite academic style, then you'll appreciate this book. If you're after finer details on branding then there are better books out there.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 13, 2010 9:45 PM BST


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