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gracefuldad

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18 litre XL Really Useful clear storage box
18 litre XL Really Useful clear storage box
Offered by A2B Stationery Ltd
Price: £18.95

5.0 out of 5 stars A review for other music obsessives - 35XLs for LPs, 18Ls for CDs, 18XL for 45s, 4 Feb. 2016
I bought the RU boxes to deal with an overflow of vinyl and CDs - this is a review for other music obsessives.

If you are storing LPs you need 35XL boxes - these are ones that come with an extra high lid. Careful when you search for these as there are also Extra strong boxes in the standard 35L size - so make sure you're getting the Extra Large.

Before you buy 35XL boxes for LPs, it's worth checking that you're happy to walk around carrying around 100 LPs. This is quite a weight, as I discovered when I carried a few of these up two flights of stairs. There are also smaller RU boxes that take fewer LPs, but I've not purchased these so can't review them. I didn't buy the smaller size as the 35s were more economical.

For CDs you need 18L - CDs fit in snugly, and you don't need the extra height. This is a lot lighter than a box of LPs.

For 45s (i.e. vinyl singles) you'll need 18XL boxes, again these have the extra high lids.

One useful thing to note is that the 35 litre and 18 litre boxes have the same footprint. So you can stack them on top of each other. They also use the same lids, so you can swap the lid from a 35XL for the lid of an 18L etc.. I was purchasing both types of boxes, and found I could get a better deal at the time through buying 18XLs and 35Ls, and swapping the lids around. Really Useful also sell lids on their website, although these are expensive and the minimum postal charge is quite high if you only want a few. I shopped around - I found a good deal on multipacks of 35Ls, and have seen a few more good deals subsequently. I bought the 18XLs from a well known stationery store who also listed their goods on Amazon. Going to them directly meant that I could both get free P&P, and take advantage of a discount code that was easy to find on the web.

I think the XL lids may be a bit more fragile - I had a delivery of nine boxes and two lids were damaged.

Unlike other boxes I've used in the past, the RU boxes have vertical sides. This makes them better for storing LPs etc.. But it does mean that the boxes do not stack inside each other - the empty boxes take up a lot of room (three empty boxes take up as much room as two full ones, since you can put one box inside two others).

The blue plastic piece clicks the box shut neatly. You don't lift the box by the blue clip, there's a proper handle on the box.


Really Useful 18C Box - Clear
Really Useful 18C Box - Clear
Price: £10.41

5.0 out of 5 stars A review for other music obsessives - 35XLs for LPs, 18Ls for CDs, 18XL for 45s, 4 Feb. 2016
I bought the RU boxes to deal with an overflow of vinyl and CDs - this is a review for other music obsessives.

If you are storing LPs you need 35XL boxes - these are ones that come with an extra high lid. Careful when you search for these as there are also Extra strong boxes in the standard 35L size - so make sure you're getting the Extra Large.

Before you buy 35XL boxes for LPs, it's worth checking that you're happy to walk around carrying around 100 LPs. This is quite a weight, as I discovered when I carried a few of these up two flights of stairs. There are also smaller RU boxes that take fewer LPs, but I've not purchased these so can't review them. I didn't buy the smaller size as the 35s were more economical.

For CDs you need 18L - CDs fit in snugly, and you don't need the extra height. This is a lot lighter than a box of LPs.

For 45s (i.e. vinyl singles) you'll need 18XL boxes, again these have the extra high lids.

One useful thing to note is that the 35 litre and 18 litre boxes have the same footprint. So you can stack them on top of each other. They also use the same lids, so you can swap the lid from a 35XL for the lid of an 18L etc.. I was purchasing both types of boxes, and found I could get a better deal at the time through buying 18XLs and 35Ls, and swapping the lids around. Really Useful also sell lids on their website, although these are expensive and the minimum postal charge is quite high if you only want a few. I shopped around - I found a good deal on multipacks of 35Ls, and have seen a few more good deals subsequently. I bought the 18XLs from a well known stationery store who also listed their goods on Amazon. Going to them directly meant that I could both get free P&P, and take advantage of a discount code that was easy to find on the web.

I think the XL lids may be a bit more fragile - I had a delivery of nine boxes and two lids were damaged.

Unlike other boxes I've used in the past, the RU boxes have vertical sides. This makes them better for storing LPs etc.. But it does mean that the boxes do not stack inside each other - the empty boxes take up a lot of room (three empty boxes take up as much room as two full ones, since you can put one box inside two others).

The blue plastic piece clicks the box shut neatly. You don't lift the box by the blue clip, there's a proper handle on the box.


Really Useful Plastic Storage Box 35 Litre Xl - Color: Clear
Really Useful Plastic Storage Box 35 Litre Xl - Color: Clear
Offered by Ryman Stationery and Office Supplies
Price: £14.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A review for other music obsessives - 35XLs for LPs, 18Ls for CDs, 18XL for 45s, 4 Feb. 2016
A review for other music obsessives - 35XLs for LPs, 18Ls for CDs, 18XL for 45s
I bought the RU boxes to deal with an overflow of vinyl and CDs - this is a review for other music obsessives.

If you are storing LPs you need 35XL boxes - these are ones that come with an extra high lid. Careful when you search for these as there are also Extra strong boxes in the standard 35L size - so make sure you're getting the Extra Large.

Before you buy 35XL boxes for LPs, it's worth checking that you're happy to walk around carrying around 100 LPs. This is quite a weight, as I discovered when I carried a few of these up two flights of stairs. There are also smaller RU boxes that take fewer LPs, but I've not purchased these so can't review them. I didn't buy the smaller size as the 35s were more economical.

For CDs you need 18L - CDs fit in snugly, and you don't need the extra height. This is a lot lighter than a box of LPs.

For 45s (i.e. vinyl singles) you'll need 18XL boxes, again these have the extra high lids.

One useful thing to note is that the 35 litre and 18 litre boxes have the same footprint. So you can stack them on top of each other. They also use the same lids, so you can swap the lid from a 35XL for the lid of an 18L etc.. I was purchasing both types of boxes, and found I could get a better deal at the time through buying 18XLs and 35Ls, and swapping the lids around. Really Useful also sell lids on their website, although these are expensive and the minimum postal charge is quite high if you only want a few. I shopped around - I found a good deal on multipacks of 35Ls, and have seen a few more good deals subsequently. I bought the 18XLs from a well known stationery store who also listed their goods on Amazon. Going to them directly meant that I could both get free P&P, and take advantage of a discount code that was easy to find on the web.

I think the XL lids may be a bit more fragile - I had a delivery of nine boxes and two lids were damaged.

Unlike other boxes I've used in the past, the RU boxes have vertical sides. This makes them better for storing LPs etc.. But it does mean that the boxes do not stack inside each other - the empty boxes take up a lot of room (three empty boxes take up as much room as two full ones, since you can put one box inside two others).

The blue plastic piece clicks the box shut neatly. You don't lift the box by the blue clip, there's a proper handle on the box.


Really Useful 35C Box - Clear
Really Useful 35C Box - Clear
Price: £11.99

5.0 out of 5 stars A review for other music obsessives - 35XLs for LPs, 18Ls for CDs, 18XL for 45s, 4 Feb. 2016
I bought the RU boxes to deal with an overflow of vinyl and CDs - this is a review for other music obsessives.

If you are storing LPs you need 35XL boxes - these are ones that come with an extra high lid. Careful when you search for these as there are also Extra strong boxes in the standard 35L size - so make sure you're getting the Extra Large.

Before you buy 35XL boxes for LPs, it's worth checking that you're happy to walk around carrying around 100 LPs. This is quite a weight, as I discovered when I carried a few of these up two flights of stairs. There are also smaller RU boxes that take fewer LPs, but I've not purchased these so can't review them. I didn't buy the smaller size as the 35s were more economical.

For CDs you need 18L - CDs fit in snugly, and you don't need the extra height. This is a lot lighter than a box of LPs.

For 45s (i.e. vinyl singles) you'll need 18XL boxes, again these have the extra high lids.

One useful thing to note is that the 35 litre and 18 litre boxes have the same footprint. So you can stack them on top of each other. They also use the same lids, so you can swap the lid from a 35XL for the lid of an 18L etc.. I was purchasing both types of boxes, and found I could get a better deal at the time through buying 18XLs and 35Ls, and swapping the lids around. Really Useful also sell lids on their website, although these are expensive and the minimum postal charge is quite high if you only want a few. I shopped around - I found a good deal on multipacks of 35Ls, and have seen a few more good deals subsequently. I bought the 18XLs from a well known stationery store who also listed their goods on Amazon. Going to them directly meant that I could both get free P&P, and take advantage of a discount code that was easy to find on the web.

I think the XL lids may be a bit more fragile - I had a delivery of nine boxes and two lids were damaged.

Unlike other boxes I've used in the past, the RU boxes have vertical sides. This makes them better for storing LPs etc.. But it does mean that the boxes do not stack inside each other - the empty boxes take up a lot of room (three empty boxes take up as much room as two full ones, since you can put one box inside two others).

The blue plastic piece clicks the box shut neatly. You don't lift the box by the blue clip, there's a proper handle on the box.


30 Trips Around The Sun The Definitive Live Story (1965-1995)
30 Trips Around The Sun The Definitive Live Story (1965-1995)
Offered by MediaMine
Price: £16.79

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 30 Years, So Many Roads, 16 Oct. 2015
There’s a fabulous Dead boxset ‘So Many Roads’ which provides an alternative chronological history of the band over 5CDs of live and studio tracks which were not officially released previously. That boxset is full of gems and is seriously worth seeking out. It upweights their earlier years (it only reaches the 1980s on the penultimate track of the third disk), but it also finds some lovely performances from the 1990s on the 5th disk from the February 1993 unreleased So Many Roads sessions, before finishing with a poignant live recording of So Many Roads itself from 1995. So Many Roads is a boxset that I return to again and again. I even bought a spare copy.

Over 15 years have passed since the So Many Roads box. A huge number of live recordings have been released in the meantime including Dick’s and Dave’s, Road Trips and many more; individual gigs cherry picked from each year, even entire tours including Europe 1972 (ah, more about 1972 later).

It was always going to be difficult for 30 Trips. The concept was to produce a huge boxset comprising of one unreleased gig from each year of the Dead’s existence. Then for the 4CD version to select a single song from each of these gigs. And then present these in a chronological sequence. No songs are allowed to be repeated. And there is strictly only one song each year, no segues. So when St Stephen starts up after Dark Star it has to be quickly faded out. And there is no China Cat > Rider, where much of the enjoyment is from the instrumental passage linking the two songs.

The first disk is nearly all great. It kicks off with a studio track (‘Caution’) from 1965 before picking a concert track from 1966 onwards, beginning with an energised Cream Puff War from 1966 (albeit with distorted vocals). An enjoyable 10 minute Dark Star from October ’68, some 4 months before the LiveDead recording.

And as this is the Dead, some songs start and you think it’s not particularly special (they’re never really going to be able to replicate the harmonies from the sublime Uncle John’s Band on stage) but then the songs develop and go off in an unexpected direction, and it becomes clear why they’ve been included in this box.

I'm always going to be interested in hearing another rendition of Dark Star, even though there are a couple of dozen or more on officially released CDs. Overall though the wealth of concert CDs already available mean that in the vast majority of cases there are already superior renditions available of just about all of the tracks here. And there are too many great Dead songs that don't even make it onto this set.

Listening to the entire box all the way through, sometime into the third disk it started to feel more like work than enjoyment. For me though it became really hard going when Disk 4 started with two tracks featuring Brent’s strident vocals high in the mix, then later Broken Arrow featuring Phil – I’m sorry, but there are times when they really shouldn’t Let Phil Sing.

The booklet is very informative – I hadn’t realised CPW is the only Dead song written solely by Jerry. And the enthusiasm with which this has been written does strongly argue the case for the inclusion of each track. But I think the content of this box is too constrained by the rigidity of the concept.

To represent 1972, a year of classic performances already nicely anthologised on two 2CD sets, they’ve instead decided to go for novelty / rarity. 1972 is here represented by a cover of a Dolly Parton song (‘Tomorrow is Forever’ – no I hadn’t heard of this either) which the Dead only ever played a few times. A great year is represented by a weak performance.

The ‘Not Fade Away’ from 1988 which starts the 4th disk is included to show how the audience pick up the refrain at the end and continue after the band have left the stage – which is OK, but it’s not something I want to return to. And it would make more sense to have this at the end of the CD, not the beginning.

And of course having to represent each and every year with a single track does mean that 16 out of the 31 tracks are from the 80s and 90s. I know that the Dead had a resurgence in the late-1980s with Touch of Grey (their only hit single, not in this box). But for me this gives far too much weight to their output from the second half of their career, whereas their reputation was founded on their hugely creative late 60s and early 70s period. It's odd that the longest track in the box is a 16 minute Shakedown Street from 1981 (OK, Viola Lee Blues comes close, but you get my point).

The box itself is DVD size. The disks are quite tricky to remove, particularly the two at the rear of the trays which have other disks overlapping that have to be removed first. I've ended up reconfiguring the layout slightly, and now have CD3 and CD4 underneath the other two disks. I'll play tracks from CD1&2 again, but I think CD3&4 will be staying in the box.

Each November for the last few years the Dead have distributed a live song to download each day, '30 days of the Dead'. Initially these came with CD inserts to print. They are doing this again this year (2015), doubtless you can also find the downloads from previous years. I think these also give a pretty good overview of the history of the Dead, as good as you'll find on 30 Trips.

By the way, the Fare Thee Well concerts are being (have been?) released around now, with Trey Anastasio replacing Jerry (Bob Weir wore a ‘Let Trey Sing’ T-Shirt!) For some reason the Dead appear to be only releasing the final 3 shows from Chicago, whereas there were also two concerts on the West Coast the previous week. I think only one song was repeated across the 5 reunion concerts (Truckin’ was on the first and final night). This is pretty impressive when you consider that each show ran for over 3 hours (although this does smack of another concept – we’re going to do 5 shows without duplication). If you prefer early Dead, and if you are happy for Trey to take on lead guitar and vocals, then concert footage of the first night at Santa Clara is worth seeking out: I think the most recent tracks are from ’71 (apart from the Rhythm Devils interlude, which did seem a bit out of place in this context), and it includes Dark Star>St Stephen>The Eleven.

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By the way, the Dead did release a song a day on their website in November 2015 to download for free - these are all still available as at early December 2015....

1st Sunrise
2nd Crazy Fingers
3rd Comes A Time
4th Estimated Prophet
5th Dupree's Diamond Blues
6th Feel Like A Stranger
7th Dark Star
8th China Cat Sunflower>I Know You Rider
9th The Music Never Stopped
10th He's Gone>Jam
11th Uncle John's Band> U.S. Blues
12th Foolish Heart
13th Lost Sailor>Saint Of Circumstance
14th My Brother Esau
15th New Potato Caboose
16th The Other One>Jam>I Know You Rider
17th St. Stephen
18th Blow Away
19th Ship Of Fools
20th Hell In A Bucket
21st Far From Me
22nd You Don't Have To Ask
23rd China Doll
24th Black Throated Wind
25th Operator
26th Althea
27th They Love Each Other
28th Box Of Rain
29th Lazy River Road
30th Uncle John's Band
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Dec 1, 2015 12:23 PM GMT


Live at The Cow Palace, New Years Eve 1973
Live at The Cow Palace, New Years Eve 1973
Price: £9.99

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 4CD vs 3CD vs MP3, 10 Sept. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a very enjoyable concert, mostly decent quality sound, and with a few surprises including an instrumental Whipping Post. Definitely worth the tenner or so that Amazon are currently charging.

Some tracks on the 3CD version are edited down from the 4CD version. Most noticeably Mountain Jam (which is cut from 16+ minutes to 8 minutes), and Les Brers>Drums>Les Brers, and Hideaway / You Upset Me which each lose around 5 minutes. I've attached a photo of the back of the 4CD set which includes the track timings.

I bought my 4 CD set from Amazon, who included a free MP3 download. Except the MP3s are for the tracks on the 3CD version. Currently (Sept 15) clicking on the 'Buy MP3 album' link on the Amazon listing for the 4CD set also takes you to the MP3 version of the 3CD set (which you can see from the cover pic and the track timings) and this is what Amazon give you when you buy the 4CD set. So if you're still deciding which version to get, buying the 4CD set gets you both!
Comment Comment | Permalink


Where But For Caravan Would I?
Where But For Caravan Would I?

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good compilation of the early years, with a unique track, 2 May 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This compilation includes a track that to my knowledge is unavailable elsewhere - Golf Girl from Grey & Pink has been remastered and remixed and now runs for 6'11" including the count in and an extra minute or so at the end - the Jimmy Hastings flute which was edited on the original release now appears to be included in full - this is not a minor tweak, this is noticeably different. This version is not even included on the Deluxe Grey & Pink triple.

This is a fascinating revaluation of their early years compared with the previous Canterbury Tales collection - this time around there are 4 tracks from their debut including the marvelous 9 minute track that gives this compilation its title, and the sound of these is much improved. Maurice Haylett was previously unreleased (although this is now also available on the reissued If I Could). This compilation also includes Winter Wine, which amazingly was omitted from the earlier compilation, this means that you get almost all of Grey & Pink here. To make room, though, a couple of tracks have been lost from If I Could - we're now missing Hello Hello and the original For Richard, which appears only as the live version from New Symphonia (the previous compilation had both versions). This time around Love in Your Eye is the original version from Waterloo Lily, the only track from that album.


Afters by Hatfield & North (2011) Audio CD
Afters by Hatfield & North (2011) Audio CD

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars If you have their two wonderful studio albums then you don't need this, 24 April 2015
Just in case you're thinking this is a rare lost album by the Hatfields, as I did initially - it isn't. This is a compilation of tracks from the only two studio albums recorded by the band, some of which have been edited. When this album first came out it did offer other rare and unreleased tracks, but these now all appear on the CD reissues of the first album (which adds both sides of their 'Let's Eat' single) and on the reissue of Rotter Club (the live tracks). Which makes the Afters compilation redundant (especially at the price that's currently being asked by Amazon traders).

However there are a couple of CDs of BBC sessions, live tracks, and demos from the original fab four Hatfields that have been released: Hatwise Choice and Hattitude. These came out about 10 years ago, and are also occasionally listed second-hand on Amazon by traders at high prices. The good news though is that these are still in print, available through Burning Shed. And purchasing these new directly benefits the surviving Hatfields and the family of Pip Pyle.


Afters
Afters
Offered by TOMMY's STORE
Price: £19.63

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars If you have their two wonderful studio albums, then you don't need this!, 24 April 2015
This review is from: Afters (Audio CD)
Just in case you're thinking this is a rare lost album by the Hatfields, as I did initially - it isn't. This is a compilation of tracks from the only two studio albums recorded by the band, some of which have been edited. When this album first came out it did offer other rare and unreleased tracks, but these now all appear on the CD reissues of the first album (which adds both sides of their 'Let's Eat' single) and on the reissue of Rotter Club (the live tracks). Which makes the Afters compilation redundant (especially at the price that's currently being asked by Amazon traders).

However there are a couple of CDs of BBC sessions, live tracks, and demos from the original fab four Hatfields that have been released: Hatwise Choice and Hattitude. These came out about 10 years ago, and are also occasionally listed second-hand on Amazon by traders at high prices. The good news though is that these are still in print, available through Burning Shed. And purchasing these new directly benefits the surviving Hatfields and the family of Pip Pyle.


Losing Our Virginity
Losing Our Virginity
Price: £15.50

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Flawed but fascinating, 14 Feb. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Losing Our Virginity (Audio CD)
Seems odd now, but there was a time when record labels really meant something. In the late 60s and early 70s I trusted Island, Harvest and Virgin. They didn’t have a sound, like Tamla, but they had an ethos, a spirit of experimentation. I cared about these labels. While inevitably each had duds, for a while the success rate was high, at least to my ears. And there’s a way to revisit each with CD sets: Island has the Strangely Strange compilation, Harvest the excellent but pricey Harvest Festival, and now we have this.

It’s a fascinating listen, a mix of old favourites with some tracks, indeed a couple of artists, I’ve never heard before (though I wouldn’t be upset if I didn’t hear Boxer again). Overall certainly worth getting for the nostalgia, and just about all of the early major artists on Virgin are represented. Looking down the list of early Virgin Releases there aren’t many that are missing from this compilation – the first is Chili Charles’s ‘Busy Corner’, and who bought that? Ok I did, but it wasn’t that great, and was soon deleted along with the Tom Newman LP and the Manor Live LP (both of which are represented here).

The Virginity set does have the appearance of having been cobbled together without much care.

The Hatfield and David Bedford tracks on Disk 2 have been swapped round so they are labelled incorrectly on the cover. The other HATN track is Fitter Stoke, not Stroke. A couple of tracks are from the Caroline label rather than Virgin (though I enjoyed hearing Egg again, and would have liked tracks from a couple of other Caroline releases that I bought on LP). I enjoyed hearing White Noise for the first time, but this is the name of the album not a band, it’s by David Vorhaus.

One major omission of course is Tangerine Dream – Edgar Froese and Klaus Schulze appear with tracks from their solo albums, but you’d really expect to at least have an excerpt from Phaedra or Rubycon on here somewhere. Earlier TD compilations showed that Virgin were prepared to reduce long TD tracks to short extracts (exceptionally short extracts in the case of Dream Sequence, where Phaedra lasts less than a minute and a half).

It also seems extraordinary not to have anything from Robert Wyatt’s Rock Bottom. In fact while Virgin was very much an album label, there are a disproportionate number of singles on here: the two from Robert Wyatt, Hatfield’s Let Eat Again (which they introduced on stage as a shameless attempt at writing a hit, which it wasn’t), Can’s Silent Night (oh dear), Kevin Coyne’s Marlene (it was good to hear this again, one of the tracks I’ve not heard since the 70s)...

There’s space on the CDs for the various other omissions that I’m sure folks will point out – you could fit another quarter hour of music on the second disk, and almost that much again on disk 3.

And the booklet is a disgrace. It did start by telling me a couple of things I didn’t know about Virgin (the author had read RB’s autobiography, whereas I haven’t), but then it had very little to say about the tracks on the CDs. It would have been nice to have a track by track guide or at least be told which albums they are from or show the covers – surely some of these must still be available, do the current owners of Virgin Records not want us to buy their back catalogue?

Still, it’s sold at a low price of just over a tenner for a 3CD set – taking inflation into account, the 35/- (35 shilling) LPs sold by Virgin in the early days would probably now equate to over £20 each, for 40 minutes of music). It’s a great nostalgia trip, and I heard some stuff I didn’t know and that I enjoyed. It’s just a shame that with a little bit more care it could have been so much better.

And here are the early Virgin releases...
V2001 - Mike Oldfield - Tubular Bells
V2002 - Gong - Flying Teapot
V2003 - V.A. - Manor Live
V2004 - Faust - IV
V2005 - Henry Cow - Legend
V2006 - Link Wray - Beans And Fatback
V2007 - Gong - Angels Egg
V2008 - Hatfield And The North - Hatfield And The North
V2009 - Chili Charles - Busy Corner
V2010 - Tangerine Dream - Phaedra
V2011 - Henry Cow - Unrest
V2012 - Kevin Coyne - Blame It On The Night
V2013 - Mike Oldfield - Hergest Ridge
V2014 - Slapp Happy - Slapp Happy
V2015 - Captain Beefheart - Unconditionally Guaranteed
V2016 - Edgar Froese - Aqua
V2017 - Robert Wyatt - Rock Bottom
V2018 - Comus - To Keep From Crying
V2019 - Gong - You
V2020 - David Bedford - Star's End
V2021 - Ivor Cutler - Dandruff
V2022 - Tom Newman - Fine Old Tom
V2023 - Captain Beefheart - Bluejeans and Moonbeams
V2024 - Slapp Happy/Henry Cow - Desperate Straights
V2025 - Tangerine Dream - Rubycon
V2026 - Mike Oldfield - The Orchestral Tubular Bells
V2027 - Henry Cow/Slapp Happy - In Praise Of Learning
V2028 - Chili Charles - Quick Stop
V2029 - Clearlight Symphony - Clearlight Symphony
V2030 - Hatfield And The North - The Rotters' Club
V2031 - Steve Hillage - Fish Rising
V2032 - David Vorhaus - White Noise 2
V2033 - Kevin Coyne - Matching Head And Feet
V2034 - Robert Wyatt - Ruth Is Stranger Than Richard
V2035 - Wigwam - Nuclear Nightclub
V2036 - Pekka Pohjola - B The Magpipe
V2037 - Ivor Cutler - Velvet Donkey
V2038 - David Bedford - The Rhyme Of The Ancient Mariner
V2039 - Clearlight - Forever Blowing Bubbles
V2040 - Edgar Froese - Epsilon In Malaysian Pale
V2041 - Can - Landed
V2042 - Tom Newman - Live At The Argonaut
V2043 - Mike Oldfield - Ommadawn
V2044 - Tangerine Dream - Ricochet
V2045 - Mallard - Mallard
V2046 - Gong - Shamal
V2047 - Kevin Coyne - Heartburn
V2048 – U-Roy - Dread In A Babylon
V2049 - Boxer - Below The Belt
V2050 - Link Wray - Stuck In Gear


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