Profile for Ms. J. Jones > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Ms. J. Jones
Top Reviewer Ranking: 3,964
Helpful Votes: 155

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Ms. J. Jones "Julia Jones"
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-12
pixel
Circle Line: Around London in a Small Boat
Circle Line: Around London in a Small Boat
by Steffan Meyric Hughes
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.29

5.0 out of 5 stars London's forgotten waters, 17 Aug 2014
"Every man must believe in something. I believe I'll go canoeing." Steffan Meyric Hughes chooses this quote from H.D. Thoreau to launch his ten day journey round the canals and forgotten rivers of London. He is, it's probably fair to say. a canoeist at heart and some of his reminiscences of teenage dare-devilry in kayaks convey a real feeling for water as a place where you can test yourself. His exploration down the South London River Wandle is undertaken in his own kayak and is one of the best pieces in a good book. The main journey is undertaken in a small versatile wooden dinghy, simple to sail, light enough to row and with an outboard engine when required. There's a poignant moment down the flight of locks from Victoria Park to Limehouse Basin where Hughes meets a small girl who is puzzled and then intrigued by the concept of a dinghy. "Can I come for a ride with you in it?" He has to refuse but rows away buoyed up by the realisation that "Kids don't sail or find some other way of leaving the world behind walls only because they don't know how to - not because they don't want to." One of the by-products of Circle Line may be a reminder of how much fun and challenge can be obtained from very small patches of water and how under-used and under- appreciated the waters of London are. There are of course odd characters living secretive lives in forgotten corners and Hughes makes the most of his encounters with the, He's also tremendously good on little known facts -- such as the plague of terrapin that resulted from the end of the Ninja Turtles craze and the number of disused power stations that are left after the age of Victorian engineering. To quote Thoreau again "One generation abandons the enterprises of another like stranded vessels." The Thames is a mighty accumulation of obsolete enterprises and wrecked vessels but Hughes's technique of personal narrative keeps his story readable and in proportion. All I would really have liked to have added to this book would have been a very much better map.


Trickster's Point (Cork O'Connor Mystery)
Trickster's Point (Cork O'Connor Mystery)
by William Kent Krueger
Edition: Paperback
Price: 9.04

5.0 out of 5 stars Another good story in a great series, 4 Aug 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Always enjoy the Cork O'Connor stories and this was no exception. Possibly If I thought really hard it might not have been my number one among William Kent Krueger's works but the standard is so high


Our Man in Camelot
Our Man in Camelot
by Anthony Price
Edition: Paperback

3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointed - but it could be me, 4 Aug 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Our Man in Camelot (Paperback)
Used to love reading Anthony Price so was sorry to find this rather dated and dull. Perhaps the fault was in me - or the changing times


Paul Elvstrom Speaks: To His Sailing Friends on His Life and Racing Career
Paul Elvstrom Speaks: To His Sailing Friends on His Life and Racing Career
by Paul Elvstrom
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars Autobiography of an extraordinary racing sailor, 4 Aug 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Fascinating autobiography by a determined and individual personality. I didn't know enough about dinghy racing to follow Elvstrom in his medal winning career but it did diminish my enjoyment of this book


Ellen's People: Without Warning (The Ellen Trilogy)
Ellen's People: Without Warning (The Ellen Trilogy)
Price: 1.83

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An attractive and honest observer, 4 Aug 2014
Ellen's People is the story of a young girl and her family struggling to survive the First World War. In August 1914 Ellen is just 16 and is living in the Sussex countryside with her parents, her older brother and two younger sisters. Her father is a signalman and has some strong 'anti-toff' views. Class suspicions, village tensions and family relationships make for an unexpected flare-up of local conflict when the recruiting officer arrives and Ellen's brother volunteers. There is, as any reader will guess, considerably worse to come.

Ellen's People is suitable for older children as well as adults. The horror and the strain of war is fully acknowledged but it is mediated through the central character, who is a loving and grieving sister rather than a combatant. There is a simplicity in the writing which is attractive and accessible and reflects Ellen's youthful personality. From a relatively sheltered position in the middle of her family she is forced out into the world and has to make her own accommodations with the mix of snobbery and kindliness that she encounters from her employers and others. Dennis Hamley is adept at conveying the social attitudes of a century ago while avoiding stereotypes. One of the pleasures of Ellen's People is the variousness of the characters, whatever their class. Their reactions are determined by their personal and moral qualities as much as by the conventions of their social position – though these are never underestimated.

I found Ellen's People a pacy, engrossing and convincing read -- though as an adult with a strong interest in history it didn't tell me anything about World War 1 that I didn't already know. But that wasn't why I was reading it. Dennis Hamley is an accomplished writer and develops Ellen as an engaging and honest observer as well as a quietly determined participant. I'll be glad to follow her in her postwar future


Start to Win
Start to Win
by Eric Twiname
Edition: Hardcover

4.0 out of 5 stars Classic old fashioned dinghy racing book, 9 May 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Start to Win (Hardcover)
Obviously dated but well worth a read as much of the advice is as sound as it ever was. Dinghy design and construction has changed but the skill and mental attitude of the skipper remains the vital factor


Gideon's Day (Gideon of Scotland Yard)
Gideon's Day (Gideon of Scotland Yard)
by John Creasey
Edition: Paperback
Price: 5.69

2.0 out of 5 stars Extremely poor production, 9 May 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I cannot think how House of Status could publish a book where the production is SO bad that even the title is misprinted throughout! Really this book is littered with errors. Otherwise it's a fairly standard John Creasey title which one either enjoys or not.


The Examined Life: How We Lose and Find Ourselves
The Examined Life: How We Lose and Find Ourselves
by Stephen Grosz
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.29

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Apparently simple, yet profound, 23 April 2014
I was surprised to be given this book and wasn't at all sure that I'd like it. With in just a few pages I realised it was something special. The story of each encounter is so neatly and unpretentiously written and yet there are such insights to be shared. It's also the hidden story of this man's working life. I had tears in my eyes at the end.


Wild Wood
Wild Wood
by Jan Needle
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A welcome re-publishing, 16 April 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Wild Wood (Paperback)
I don't know how I missed this book first time around in 1981. I was a bookseller then and am a writer / publisher now. It's genial, it's truthful, it's funny and it's poignant. What more can I say except that the illustrations look wonderful and it's truly a book for all ages.


Prisonomics: Behind Bars in Britain's Failing Prisons
Prisonomics: Behind Bars in Britain's Failing Prisons
Price: 8.99

0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars believable, well reasoned and important, 6 April 2014
Vicky Pryce writes about her time in prison with constant awareness that she is not typical. She knew she would have a home to go to on release, family and friends who would stand by her and a job waiting. She also knew she was fortunate that most of her sentence was spent in the humane surroundings of East Sutton Park, one of only two open prisons for women. This book is written for all the other women prisoners whose circumstances are not so favourable. It's wide ranging and well supported by statistics. Pryce's earnings go to Working Chance the charity of which she is patron. "My experience was eye-opening and I knew it would stay with me for ever; it would shape how I thought of this world and how I behaved in it. And I would never forget it - or my fellow-residents" She constantly moves beyond her own experience to focus on the experience of others and to analyse the social benefit (or not) of imprisonment as a way of dealing with non-violent crime. I can't help feeling that some of the one-star reviews posted here say more about people's attitudes to Ms Pryce than to her thoughtful and worthwhile book.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-12