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Ms. J. Jones "Julia Jones"
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Start to Win
Start to Win
by Eric Twiname
Edition: Hardcover

4.0 out of 5 stars Classic old fashioned dinghy racing book, 9 May 2014
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This review is from: Start to Win (Hardcover)
Obviously dated but well worth a read as much of the advice is as sound as it ever was. Dinghy design and construction has changed but the skill and mental attitude of the skipper remains the vital factor


Gideon's Day (Gideon of Scotland Yard)
Gideon's Day (Gideon of Scotland Yard)
by John Creasey
Edition: Paperback
Price: 5.53

2.0 out of 5 stars Extremely poor production, 9 May 2014
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I cannot think how House of Status could publish a book where the production is SO bad that even the title is misprinted throughout! Really this book is littered with errors. Otherwise it's a fairly standard John Creasey title which one either enjoys or not.


The Examined Life: How We Lose and Find Ourselves
The Examined Life: How We Lose and Find Ourselves
by Stephen Grosz
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.29

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Apparently simple, yet profound, 23 April 2014
I was surprised to be given this book and wasn't at all sure that I'd like it. With in just a few pages I realised it was something special. The story of each encounter is so neatly and unpretentiously written and yet there are such insights to be shared. It's also the hidden story of this man's working life. I had tears in my eyes at the end.


Wild Wood
Wild Wood
by Jan Needle
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A welcome re-publishing, 16 April 2014
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I don't know how I missed this book first time around in 1981. I was a bookseller then and am a writer / publisher now. It's genial, it's truthful, it's funny and it's poignant. What more can I say except that the illustrations look wonderful and it's truly a book for all ages.


Prisonomics: Behind Bars in Britain's Failing Prisons
Prisonomics: Behind Bars in Britain's Failing Prisons
Price: 8.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars believable, well reasoned and important, 6 April 2014
Vicky Pryce writes about her time in prison with constant awareness that she is not typical. She knew she would have a home to go to on release, family and friends who would stand by her and a job waiting. She also knew she was fortunate that most of her sentence was spent in the humane surroundings of East Sutton Park, one of only two open prisons for women. This book is written for all the other women prisoners whose circumstances are not so favourable. It's wide ranging and well supported by statistics. Pryce's earnings go to Working Chance the charity of which she is patron. "My experience was eye-opening and I knew it would stay with me for ever; it would shape how I thought of this world and how I behaved in it. And I would never forget it - or my fellow-residents" She constantly moves beyond her own experience to focus on the experience of others and to analyse the social benefit (or not) of imprisonment as a way of dealing with non-violent crime. I can't help feeling that some of the one-star reviews posted here say more about people's attitudes to Ms Pryce than to her thoughtful and worthwhile book.


Horses of the Camargue
Horses of the Camargue
by Hans Silvester
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful and full of insight, 3 April 2014
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I can hardly praise this book too highly. It's the result of two years of patient following the wary herds of Carmargue ponies and the photographs are superb. The information is sensitive and expert. A book to treasure.


Margery Allingham's Mr Campion's Farewell: the Return of Albert Campion Completed by Mike Ripley
Margery Allingham's Mr Campion's Farewell: the Return of Albert Campion Completed by Mike Ripley
by Mike Ripley
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 19.99

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Goodbye - or is it?, 3 April 2014
This would have been the third 'posthumous' Campion novel to have been written by Pip Youngman Carter, widower of the late, great, Margery Allingham. After Allingham died in 1966 Youngman Carter completed her w i p Cargo of Eagles and wrote two more novels featuring the detective, Albert Campion. Youngman Carter left only fragments of the third novel at his own death in 1969 and Ripley has done considerably more than 'complete' it.

There's something nasty brewing in the historic wool town of Lindsay Carfax and Superintendent Luke of the C I D persuades his old friend Campion to go down and take a look. Ripley identifies Lindsay Carfax with the Suffolk town of Lavenham and obviously relishes building up the subterranean geography of the place as well as a cast of variously unpleasant, untrustworthy and unstable characters. He claims, modestly, to be following Youngman Carter rather than Allingham herself but he's a more experienced and assured novelist than Youngman Carter ever was. He permits himself a wider range of characters, including (rather daringly) Campion's wife, the flame-haired Lady Amanda and their son, Rupert, with his young wife Perdita, one of Youngman Carter's own new characters. I have my doubts about the self-consciously thespian Rupert and Perdita but can't quibble with Ripley's decision to use them for the more physically adventurous chapters of the investigation.

Mr Campion's Farewell is set in the late 1960s / early 70s – the time that it would have been published had Youngman Carter lived to complete it. It has a consciously dated feel which Ripley manages well. Younger characters such Ripley's own Eliza Jane Fitton wear mini-skirts and have sex outside marriage but the seventy-year old Campion is always central to the action. There is no glossing over his infirmity. “He knew he was going to be too late. He was a man who could no longer keep up with his allies, let alone chase his enemies. He was too slow. He was too old.” There is a melancholy to this portrayal of age which fits the theme of Farewell. Ripley's publishers undercut this by announcing a continuation volume


Looming Lights
Looming Lights
by George Goldsmith Carter
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars fascinating and valuable, 29 Mar 2014
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An illuminating account of a young man's service as an extra man aboard a light vessel in the early months of WW2. The author was born in Aldeburgh and early chapters of the book recall boyhood memories and his varied first jobs. The raison d'etre for the book however is shock and anger that the Germans chose deliberately to attack light vessels. There's raw emotion in this book whi was written in 1945.


Going West (Picture Puffin)
Going West (Picture Puffin)
by Martin Waddell
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars an all-time favourite, 29 Mar 2014
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I had despaired of one of my children ever learning to enjoy reading until he came across Going West at about the age of 6-7. He read it to pieces and ever since anything with Martin Wadell's beautifully simple texts and Philippe Dupasquier's detailed and humourous illustrations have been favourites in our family -- either together or separately.


Mistress Of Broad Marsh by Alfred Ludgater.
Mistress Of Broad Marsh by Alfred Ludgater.
by Alfred Ludgater
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars An Essex Curiosity, 29 Mar 2014
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Mistress of Broad Marsh is set around the Essex villages of Salcott and Tollesbury. Broad Marsh is better known today as Old Hall marshes. It's a historical tale of romance and smuggling but its main value is as a portrait of country folk in a relatively remote area. It acknowledges a debt to S Baring-Gould's Mehalah and could possibly also be compared with Allingham's Blackerchief Dick. It is however a kindlier book than either and probably closer to historical truth.


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