Profile for J. Cuevas > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by J. Cuevas
Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,654,306
Helpful Votes: 4

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
J. Cuevas (Spain)
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Biodynamic Wine, Demystified
Biodynamic Wine, Demystified
by Nicolas Joly
Edition: Paperback

3.0 out of 5 stars Lack of rigour but perhaps worth a look for those interested in byodinamic, 6 Feb. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
First of all, to all interested in this book Amazon recomends buying this book in a bunch with "What is Biodynamic Wine?: The Quality, the Taste, the Terroir" but beware that both books are almost the same (I'd say 90% of the text is exactly the same), they have a different name and the one I am reviewing has some additions in chapters 3 and 4, appendix and a new foreword. Don't make the same mistake I did.

From then on both reviews can be used in either of the texts so here is a copy paste of the review I wrote for the other book. I hope you find it useful.

"I bought the book because I was curious about byodinamics into wine but being familiar with byodinamics, it is not that I am a supporter or have deep knowledge on the subject but just I know in general terms what is about.

In general I found it an interesting book to read and think about but to start with, I mean chapter one, I found it to be a bit-of-too-much of an archaetypical vision of science opposed to nature as if they weren't compatible or even the same, mixed with a very deep pesimistic vision about what technology has brought to us compared to how things were in the 'Old times' where things seemed to be, according to the author, like paradise on Earth. If you mix that with the fact that he purposely uses a 'story' style to explain things and, with a mixture of basic science and common places, tries to explain why and how things work, the start cannot be worse or more deceptive. Added to this, in chapter one, more space is given to the nettle than to the vine -even though the chapter has to do with the Appellation de Origin Controlé (AOC)- and so the picture is complete.

The second chapter brings nothing new if one has read other books about organic agriculture but I guess it is a must, specially thinking that Joly's idea is to direct this book to wine lovers in general and not to specialists or people wanting to start their own byodinamic vineyard and cellar.

In the third chapter, Joly states two things which I completely agree with, first that the excess of homogenization in the world nowadays -not only in wine but in many other things- implies that there are no differences between a wine from Chile and a wine from France and, linked to this idea the fact that France, and the other countries of the so called 'Old World' in viticulture terms, cannot compete on the technology level since the other half of the world will automatically win the battle with cheap labour. Therefore a real need for creating a really different and personal wine exists and this book, in that context, makes sense.

However, many of his statements in this chapter -and unfortunately the book in general- are either dubious, half truths, out of context statements or simple lies -all of them unreferenced- examples of these are:

- the computer program he claims to be in use to choose the flavours of the wine by selecting different kinds of yeast,
- the comparison of an exotermic reaction -like the alcoholic fermentation is- with human fever -I'd say that, poetry appart, it has completely different starting points-,
- the asseveration that eliminating leaves to improve grape maduration is a contra-natura act,
- the affirmation that vines flowering before the summer solstice implies that the wine coming from their grapes cannot be really good due to the centrifugal forces as opposed to the centripetal ones -I'd say the ecliptic is still well above the equator then, so it seems to me a bit more as a defence to viticulture in cooler climates than something coming from deep thought and understanding-
- Etc, etc

Apart from that, whilst the book advances I find a big moral problem in the fact that, although the author so strongly opposses technology, no concerns about the global environment appear -I am not talking of the very fashionable global warming but of the 'real' environment- and, at the same time, he seems to be happy about the idea of using the 'evil system' -in his words- that has created this evil-situation -as he depicts it- in his favour in two ways: using his different points of view to eliminate competitors, and using all the logistics to send his bottles all over the world. I found both things completely immoral.

People with a scientific background will find yet more mistakes, misconceptions or prejudices, sometimes even apocaliptical rants like the one about the magnetic-pole shifting. But fortunately chapters 4 and 5 and even the small two-paged chapter 6 are worth the money paid for the book, in that part of the book one can start to understand how byodinamics work, I agree that many of the things that they do are not clear and lots of basic and oriented research are needed but some way or another the tricks work and create a fresh product one can happily drink."


Food and Wine Pairing: A Sensory Experience
Food and Wine Pairing: A Sensory Experience
by Robert J. Harrington
Edition: Paperback
Price: £122.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Very didactic, 6 Feb. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a very nice book for students or professionals wanting to improve their food-wine pairing knowledge, it gives detailed information about the technical facts that create a good match and also has exercises to try whilst reading it.

I think the ideal use of this book is a textbook in a food-wine pairing course but I bought it for the pleasure of knowing a bit more about the subject and I'm happy about it.

PS: the book includes technical details that whilst not too-difficult can increase the difficulty of reading the text and make it less appealing to some readers


What to Drink with What You Eat: The Definitive Guide to Pairing Food with Wine, Beer, Spirits, Coffee, Tea - Even Water - Based on Expert Advice from
What to Drink with What You Eat: The Definitive Guide to Pairing Food with Wine, Beer, Spirits, Coffee, Tea - Even Water - Based on Expert Advice from
by Andrew Dornenburg
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £23.92

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Handy but oriented mainly to the north-american market, 6 Feb. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I like the book and the way it is organized, it can be used as a quick reference for any ocasion. I gave 3 stars though as for an european reader many of the types of drinks presented (mainly when talking about wines) are difficult to find or would need an european alternative.

Anyway I recommend having it to use as a reference when organizing meals.


[2 Pack] TECHGEAR® Apple iPad 4 iPad 3 & iPad 2 Clear Screen Protector Guard Covers with Cloth & App Card - for 2nd, 3rd & 4th Generation iPad
[2 Pack] TECHGEAR® Apple iPad 4 iPad 3 & iPad 2 Clear Screen Protector Guard Covers with Cloth & App Card - for 2nd, 3rd & 4th Generation iPad
Offered by TECHGEAR Solutions
Price: £1.95

4.0 out of 5 stars It's what it says, 6 Feb. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Very cheap and OK screen protectors for the IPad 2. I chose 4 stars as I'm never satisfied with the installation of this plastic films, I never managed to get a completely flat installation as the one that appears on the publicity so as long as there is something I am missing expect to have some air-bubles after the installation of this protector.


Hard Candy Cases Bubble Sleeve Case for Apple iPad 4, iPad 3, iPad 2 , Black, (BSL-IPAD-BLK)
Hard Candy Cases Bubble Sleeve Case for Apple iPad 4, iPad 3, iPad 2 , Black, (BSL-IPAD-BLK)
Offered by Hard Candy Cases
Price: £14.95

5.0 out of 5 stars It's as it says, 6 Feb. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I chose 5 stars as the product it is what it says, a hard cover for the ipad that you can use to protect it whilst in transporting it in a bag or suitcase. It is possible to use the Ipad whilst in the case but I think that's not the main objective of this item and there are better solutions for this.

I have to add that the Ipad can be placed into this case with the Apple cover so what I have is a cover for the day by day, whilst at home, and this case when I want to travel.


What is Biodynamic Wine?: The Quality, the Taste, the Terroir
What is Biodynamic Wine?: The Quality, the Taste, the Terroir
by Nicholas Joly
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ok to try but to many "Buts", 12 Jan. 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
First of all, to all interested in this book consider not buying it and buying instead the other one by the same author: "Biodynamic Wine, Demystified", also avalaible at Amazon.I was told to buy the tw together, but, although it has a different name, it is a second edition of the book with 90% the same text and some additions in chapters 3 and 4, appendix and a new foreword. I made the mistake of buying both of them and therefore finding myself []$ out of pocket and feeling duped afterwards.

I bought the book because I was curious about byodinamics into wine but being familiar with byodinamics, it is not that I am a supporter or have deep knowledge on the subject but just I know in general terms what is about.

In general I found it an interesting book to read and think about but to start with, I mean chapter one, I found it to be a bit-of-too-much of an archaetypical vision of science opposed to nature as if they weren't compatible or even the same, mixed with a very deep pesimistic vision about what technology has brought to us compared to how things were in the 'Old times' where things seemed to be, according to the author, like paradise on Earth. If you mix that with the fact that he purposely uses a 'story' style to explain things and, with a mixture of basic science and common places, tries to explain why and how things work, the start cannot be worse or more deceptive. Added to this, in chapter one, more space is given to the nettle than to the vine -even though the chapter has to do with the Appellation de Origin Controlé (AOC)- and so the picture is complete.

The second chapter brings nothing new if one has read other books about organic agriculture but I guess it is a must, specially thinking that Joly's idea is to direct this book to wine lovers in general and not to specialists or people wanting to start their own byodinamic vineyard and cellar.

In the third chapter, Joly states two things which I completely agree with, first that the excess of homogenization in the world nowadays -not only in wine but in many other things- implies that there are no differences between a wine from Chile and a wine from France and, linked to this idea the fact that France, and the other countries of the so called 'Old World' in viticulture terms, cannot compete on the technology level since the other half of the world will automatically win the battle with cheap labour. Therefore a real need for creating a really different and personal wine exists and this book, in that context, makes sense.

However, many of his statements in this chapter -and unfortunately the book in general- are either dubious, half truths, out of context statements or simple lies -all of them unreferenced- examples of these are:

- the computer program he claims to be in use to choose the flavours of the wine by selecting different kinds of yeast,
- the comparison of an exotermic reaction -like the alcoholic fermentation is- with human fever -I'd say that, poetry appart, it has completely different starting points-,
- the asseveration that eliminating leaves to improve grape maduration is a contra-natura act,
- the affirmation that vines flowering before the summer solstice implies that the wine coming from their grapes cannot be really good due to the centrifugal forces as opposed to the centripetal ones -I'd say the ecliptic is still well above the equator then, so it seems to me a bit more as a defence to viticulture in cooler climates than something coming from deep thought and understanding-
- Etc, etc

Apart from that, whilst the book advances I find a big moral problem in the fact that, although the author so strongly opposses technology, no concerns about the global environment appear -I am not talking of the very fashionable global warming but of the 'real' environment- and, at the same time, he seems to be happy about the idea of using the 'evil system' -in his words- that has created this evil-situation -as he depicts it- in his favour in two ways: using his different points of view to eliminate competitors, and using all the logistics to send his bottles all over the world. I found both things completely immoral.

People with a scientific background will find yet more mistakes, misconceptions or prejudices, sometimes even apocaliptical rants like the one about the magnetic-pole shifting. But fortunately chapters 4 and 5 and even the small two-paged chapter 6 are worth the money paid for the book, in that part of the book one can start to understand how byodinamics work, I agree that many of the things that they do are not clear and lots of basic and oriented research are needed but some way or another the tricks work and create a fresh product one can happily drink.


Page: 1