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Waking The Witch: Number 11 in series (Otherworld)
Waking The Witch: Number 11 in series (Otherworld)
by Kelley Armstrong
Edition: Hardcover

46 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best Otherworld books there are!, 23 July 2010
This is the 11th book in The Otherworld series by Kelley Armstrong. Overall I love this series and it's one of my favourites, but I don't love every narrator. This is the first book told by Savannah and I was looking forward to it. She first appeared in book #2, Stolen, as a 12 or 13 year old witch who's mom had just been murdered. Since then she's appeared on and off as a side character, but now at 21 she's getting her first book. She's always been sassy, smart, determined and just a little dangerous, and I've always liked her, even when she was being a brat. So I figured there was a good chance I'd enjoy her story and I was looking forward to getting to know her better. Turns out, I really love her. This is one of the best Otherworld books of the series to date. For me, it's second only to book #1 Bitten, and possible book #10 Frostbitten, both told by my favourite narrator, Elena.

Savannah's story sucked me in right from the start. She's still the sassy, smart girl she's always been, and hungry to prove herself. Now she wants to take on a case solo and with Paige and Lucas (the people who raised her after her mother's death and also her bosses) on vacation and her associate (and long time crush) Adam away at a conference, now seems like the prefect time. In steps Jesse, a young PI who's worked with Lucas before, and is now looking for some help on a triple homicide case with apparent ritualistic aspects of the supernatural variety. Savannah jumps at the chance and heads to small town Columbus to see if she can solve the case. But it doesn't take long before she's making enemies and with a distinct supernatural possibility Savannah soon realises she may be next on the killers hit list.

All those traits that made her a loud mouth some times bratty kid, she uses to great advantage to work the people she needs information from. She can be brutally honest, but she's also happy to spin some pretty big tales when required. Savannah is a girl who hates to be seen as weak or vulnerable, she won't let it happen, but that doesn't mean she doesn't get scared. And it doesn't mean she doesn't have a softer side, something we've rarely seen until now. I loved getting deeper in to her head and figuring out how she works, how she thinks. She has to make some hard decisions and learns some tough lessons through this book which took their toll on her, maybe more so than we get to see here.

It was also fun getting to know Adam a little better through the eyes of someone who wants a lot more than friendship from him. But he's no the only guy who has Savannah's attention here. There is also Dallas Detective Michael Kennedy. He's the older brother of one of the victims and he arrives in Columbus at the same time as Savannah, hoping to solve the case as well. I loved the way they played off each other, particularly as Savannah's quite often shown great disregard for humans.

The story flows really well, mixing a little police procedural with witchcraft, and throws a few big shocks in along the way. I had a really hard time putting it down. Savannah is a great character to get to know, but like previous books, Kelley does a great job of creating secondary characters to love, or loathe, as well. Another plus point to this book is seeing Savannah's thoughts on some incidents that happened several books ago. She's played some big roles in the series before, despite this being the first book from her perspective, and learning how she's felt and dealt with some of those things adds something to it. There were some surprisingly intense and emotional moments in this book as well, and my heart went out to Savannah on more than one occasion. She's someone who uses a lot of her spunk to cover some pretty big issues at times, more so than I'd first have guessed.

This book has a few firsts for the series in it, but one of the most surprising ones is the ending. It was a great build up and left things completely hanging. None of the previous books have had a cliff hanger ending, but this one sure does! It's very well done and I love it as much as I hate it. The shock and surprise was felt and I'm gutted to have to wait til July next year for book #12, Spell Bound, which is also narrated (thankfully!) by Savannah.

I said it already, but I will repeat myself. This is one of the best Otherworld books to date. Kelley continues to weave great stories with great characters to keep this series fresh. With a series this long it's like settling down with an old friend for a catch up, but there is plenty of new things to keep it really interesting. If you're a fan of the Otherworld books, this is one not to be skipped! If you've yet to try them, I strongly recommend starting with book 1, Bitten, although it's not strictly needed. There is enough explanation given that you don't miss anything big with each new book, only small things, and it doesn't overload readers who've read all the previous books with repeated info. Just enough of a refresher of the most important aspects. A really great read, and I'm very excited for more books from Savannah's point of view.
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Glimmerglass (Faeriewalker, Book 1)
Glimmerglass (Faeriewalker, Book 1)
by Jenna Black
Edition: Paperback
Price: 7.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome, just loved it!, 21 July 2010
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Glimmerglass is the first book in Jenna's new young adult Faeriewalker series and I loved it!! Beginning to end I found the book almost impossible to put down. Dana is used to being the adult, taking care of herself, taking care of her drunk mother, making sure the bills get paid on time etc, but she's sick of it. Sick of constantly moving, of never being able to get close to anyone, of trying to hide her mom's alcohol dependence. She thought finding her father, running away to him in Avalon, a world in England where Faerie and the mortal worlds co-exist, would be the end of her problems, a chance to start over without being the one making all the decisions. But from the moment she touches down at London Heathrow, things start going wrong and it doesn't take long for Dana to find herself way out of her depth and more isolated than ever.

For all her maturity and experience playing the adult, Dana is only 16 and is very naive and inexperienced when it comes to boys, and friendships as well though to a slightly lesser extent. It's something she's very aware of and I think it makes her more realistic somehow. Her awkwardness with the Ethan, who is very used to girls falling all over him, is cute and understandable, and helps to make her even more likable. I also really like how she wants to be the kid, wants to be taken care of for a change. Responsibility sucks, and she knows it. But it doesn't stop her doing what she feels is the right thing when things get messy. She has to cope with a lot throughout this book and while sometimes it got to her, there are times she really rises to the occasion as well. There is one particular moment (I'm not saying details for spoilers sake) where something happens, and her reaction to it made me so freakin proud of her while I was also aching for her because it was not a nice thing that happened. I don't think I've felt quite so seriously proud of a fictional character before. I found Dana very easy to relate to, I was rooting for her the whole way and really felt for her as she tried to figure out how to survive in this new world.

The action started early on and never really let up. Avalon is shrouded in mystery and we're never given much detail of the world, how it works, the characters or their motives at once. Instead we discover little bits here and there as the story winds on, but you can't ever be too sure about much. It makes for a very intriguing story and I was just wishing for more the whole way through. I love the mysterious nature of everything in this book. But while we don't always get a lot on the side characters, every glimpse in to them we do get, is a tantalizing one, showing the possibilities for so much. I thought pretty much all the side characters were very well drawn, with their motives hidden but glimpses given to show they're more than placements for the plot. My favourites have to be Kimber, Finn and Keane, and Keane is the one who I desperately want more of in the next book. The plot moves along quickly with a lot of twists and turns, some you can see coming but the quality of the trip there meant I didn't care in the least. There was no cliff hanger ending, but even so I finished the book and was hungry for more. More of Dana, the characters and the world they exist in.

I really did completely fall for this book, the world, the characters, the writing. It's one of those fantastic YA books where the teens sound like teens, but also show the maturity they can posses, even though they still screw up. The kind of YA books I think can easily appeal to adults and teens alike. There are some teen books where there is almost the sense of the teens being made to sound younger than they are, and that doesn't happen here. Here, like in Vampire Academy (Richelle Mead), Strange Angels (Lili St Crow), it's almost the sense of untold respect for teens from the author. It's something I don't feel too often, but it's here, and it makes the book that much better. It's a gripping and intense journey with Dana, and one I thoroughly enjoyed. I can't wait for book 2, Shadowspell, next year. If you're a fan of YA and/or UF books, this one should be a must read!


Forget You
Forget You
by Jennifer Echols
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Couldn't put it down., 17 July 2010
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This review is from: Forget You (Paperback)
Jennifer's previous romantic drama book, Going Too Far, is incredible. It's one of my favourite YA books of all time and because of it, I was really looking forward to this book. I wasn't let down. I do prefer Going Too Far, it would be hard to top it, or match it, but this is still a great read and if you liked Going Too Far then you should enjoy this one too. If you've not read it, then you should read this one as well as Going Too Far, as soon as possible.

Zoey is trying very hard to hold her life together. It's been falling apart for a while, but then one incident fractures it completely. Zoey makes a surprising, and not altogether smart, choice which causes her to try and do everything a certain way, the right way. But then the car crash happens and everything changes again. She's desperate to find out the truth of that night, without anyone, her best friends, her boyfriend, her swim team, finding out she doesn't know anything about that night. Or worse, that her family life is in crisis. Easier said than done. And strangely, the guy who's hated her for years, Doug, seems most willing to help.

I really enjoyed this book. Zoey's vulnerability and strong outer front drew me in and I had a hard time putting the book down. She's got a lot of issues to deal with, a lot of weight resting on her shoulders when it shouldn't be. I really felt for her as she struggled to figure out the events of that night and what happened to her, and also as she tried to deal with her family as they fell apart.

I think my favourite thing about Jennifer's work is how well she manages to write characters that come alive on the page. Love them, hate them, get mad at them, feel their pain, whatever it is, you feel it. I just feel like I get really involved with her stories and characters. The plot here is intense and troubled. Zoey doesn't make things easy for herself and some less-than-smart decisions make matters worse. But at the same time I could see exactly where she was coming from and what made her make the choices she did, even if they weren't all that great, or down right dumb. I felt so bad for her knowing those decisions were going to make things worse for her and knowing they had to happen anyway. Doug and Zoey play so well off each other, the chemistry slowly developing and changing as the intenity did the more Zoey figured out what was going on.

I love how the characters grow and change through the book, most learning from some of the mistakes they've made and coming out better for them on the other side. That's how life is, people screw up, learn, grow and change, and it's not sugar coated here. It's a great read with fantastic characters and a gripping plot as Zoey attempts to discover the truth of the night of the crash and deal with it. The ending is intense, painful and brilliant. Incredibly hard to put down and I'd highly recommend it!


Magic on the Storm (Allie Beckstrom Novels)
Magic on the Storm (Allie Beckstrom Novels)
by Devon Monk
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fave Allie book to date, 16 July 2010
This is probably my favourite of the Allie Beckstrom series so far. Like the books before it there is a lot going on, with many hidden agendas and you can never be completely sure who to trust or what's going to happen next. I had a really hard time putting the book down, particularly towards the end. There were a few big shocks and the more intense it got, the more difficult it was to put down! I love the magical side to these books, the way it works, the price it costs, and the plots surrounding it and the Authority. It's cleverly crafted making a lot possible, but more impossible. But more than that I love the interplay between Allie, Zay and Shame. This book sees the addition of several new characters and one of them is Terric, who became a new favourite within a couple of pages. He's got a fair bit of history with Zay and Shame, add him to the mix and things got really interesting.

Likewise, I love the growth of the characters, Allie in particular, and the way we gradually learn more about them though the books. Allie has a lot resting on her shoulders already but she's always willing to throw herself deeper in trouble to help her friends, even though she's often terrified and doesn't really know what she's doing. She's capable and learns from her mistakes. I also love how Allie isn't afraid to ask tough questions, particularly of those she loves. She can push too far, but she does it in an attempt to understand them better, to better help and support them, if she can. Allie faces huge new battles in this book, both personal and with the Authority. I like how she handles them, not without fear or worry but with the determination to do the right thing.

Aside from the Authority, there is the continuation of Allie with her Hounds, and the fall out Davy is having to deal with from the blood magic Greyson and Tomi worked on him. And Greyson is someone Allie needs to worry a lot about. The Authority have him contained, but Allie's convinced that doesn't stop him being dangerous. And now that Zayvion and Allie know for sure they're Soul Complements, things between them are a little more complicated than before.

The ending was intense and explosive. It just kept growing with new twists. It answered some questions and left a whole lot more in their wake. Lots of shocks and drama and sadness. It did some nice setting up for the next book, but left with Allie in a place where I was desperate to know what happens next. Another well written, entertaining, intense Allie Beckstrom book and I am really looking forward to the next book, Magic At The Gate, in November.


Take Me There
Take Me There
by Susane Colasanti
Edition: Paperback
Price: 5.36

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Loved it!!, 13 July 2010
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This review is from: Take Me There (Paperback)
Set over the course of a week, this book tells the story of three friends, from each of their perspectives. We start off with Rhiannon, who is devastated at having been dumped by her boyfriend Steve, and desperate to have him back. We follow her story through til the middle of the week, then switch to her best friend Nicole, who's ex wants her back, but she's crushing big time on someone new. We get those same three days from her POV. Then we get them from their other friend, James, who is completely in love with Rhiannon, but doesn't really see it yet. Repeat for the second half of the week/book.

Now, that may make it sound repetitive or boring, or maybe just frustrating because you're going over the same things and obviously these three characters interact a lot. But it actually really works! I loved this book and really struggled to put it down. Yes, stepping back in time means the story stops before moving on, but it's so worth it. You get more of the story from each person, learning more about them, and the other characters. There are three main stories going on, one for Rhiannan, Nicole and James, but there are side stories going on as well. There are bits of information gained via each of the three narrators about other students in the school who also have a story to tell, even if it doesn't take center stage.

The set up works really well because each of the three main characters has a strong voice and something to show. It also means the book doesn't center on a single person, or a couple even. And the added side stories show that these three students are not the only ones in that high school with problems and issues, which I love. I wanted more of some of the side stories as much as I wanted more of Rhiannon, Nicole and James. There was a lot of emotion and feeling, with some surprises to go with the side stories.

Of the three narrators, I'd have to say my least favourite was Rhiannon. I liked her a lot, but for whatever reason I found James and Nicole a little easier to get on with and more likable. But even so, I very much enjoyed all of their sections. The story deepened with each new voice, each new perspective because is showed more of the narrators we'd already seen, but from an outside perspective. It showed a wider world consisting of more than any one person, it showed different aspects to side stories, side characters, and opened up a whole new host of possibilities.

This is not a simple love story, though yes romance has a strong hold in it. But it's as much a coming of age book, of the strength of friendships, of learning who you are and what you're capable of. And how the past changes you, even if you're trying not to let it. Running only gets you so far.

Overall, it was an excellent read. I loved learning more from each character, the new hints at things and how they all learnt over the course of this one week. It shows how little things, or big things, have an impact and how life can change really quickly. The whole story unfolds slowly and carefully, gathering pace towards the end. I found my emotions rising and falling along with Rhiannon, Nicole and James. There are some surprising moments through this book, and while you can see a lot of things coming, it's still done in a way that still left me feeling the impact of the events. This is another author who I've fallen for because she doesn't talk down to readers. Her characters are real and relateable, screwing up, making fools of themselves, learning, they have dreams and ambitions, strength, thoughts, feelings, and they could be any teen in any high school anywhere. Loved this book completely and I can't wait to read the rest of Susane's books.


Stop Me If You've Heard This One Before
Stop Me If You've Heard This One Before
by David Yoo
Edition: Paperback

2.0 out of 5 stars Very unlikeable characters, 11 July 2010
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This review does contain some minor spoilers in the middle. Clearly marked before and after.

Social outcast Albert Kim is an American born Asian, with strict Asian parents who are all about his grades and his future. But by a bit of luck he gets to spend his summer working instead of as some summer school camp thing. There he finds himself working alongside the schools hottest girl, Mia. Who just happens to have recently split with her long term boyfriend, the most popular jock, Ryan. They spend the summer working together and it's good, he can tell they'll be 'something'. But then school starts again and things get complicated. And then disaster strikes. Ryan is diagnosed with cancer. After that, all bets are off as to what happens.

I was looking for a break from fantasy books for a bit and this was one of 3 I randomly decided to get. I kind of which I hadn't bothered with this one though. it's told in first person from Albert's POV and the guy is...odd. Socially awkward teens I get, but I just couldn't get on with Albert. The book has several quotes on it stating it as 'hilarious' and 'witty', maybe my sense of humor is warped, but I found very little funny. There was the odd moment that was, but most of the 'jokes' were painfully delivered and just didn't hit the mark for me. It's a little oddly paced, jumping around back and forth a bit, and I struggled to get in to it for any length of time. It was certainly different, with the ex getting cancer and Mia being torn between the two. Not to mention just how friendless and strange Albert is.

Spoilers ahead...

My biggest problems with this book though? Albert and Mia were pretty much unlikable through most of the book. Albert isn't just an outcast, he's a very strange guy with serious issues. Instead of admitting any problems with Ryan, or Mia, or just walking away when he should, he gets crazy and nasty, and very unlikable for it. He's none too smart when it comes to Mia clearly not being over Ryan and clearly treating him as a rebound. And when it goes badly? He ends up spying on Mia with a telescope. Stalker psycho much?

Mia. Drove me up the wall. I get her being upset about her and Ryan, even though she pulled the plug, I get the rebound impulse with Albert. I do not get her not seeing that she was being a complete ***** to Albert when Ryan was sick. And even before that, how she was unwilling to really admit to being anything with Albert or how she really didn't seem to notice his feelings about anything in anyway. She was nice as could be trying to help Ryan through his cancer and everything, but she noticed nothing about the guy she's 'something' with now? I tired of her really quickly.

Another problem I had was how the entire town turned in to this cult to support Ryan. Aside from Albert thinking they were being over zealous, only one other person at the school thought so too, and he was someone who kept sort of being Albert's friend. Even the younger kids next door attacked Albert when they realised it was Ryan he was mad at. It was just...crazy. Like no one had any common sense any more. I completely understand getting behind someone who has cancer to support him/her, but this was just completely over the top.

/rant. (and spoilers).

The book did have a few okay moments, it wasn't a total disaster for me. But it wasn't something I enjoyed much at all. The ending was okay, if predictable like the rest of the book, but it did nothing to make me like any of the characters any more. Aside from Albert, who was mostly strange verging on psycho, most of the characters were pretty flat with little to them and emotions flipping from one thing to another with little reason. Definitely not a fan of this book and I doubt I'd pick up anything else by the author. A shame really, because it's got the premise to be a reasonable book. But I'd recommend to not bother with this one.


When It Happens
When It Happens
by Susane Colasanti
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very enjoyable read!!, 11 July 2010
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This review is from: When It Happens (Paperback)
I've not read anything by Susane Colasanti before, but I've had a couple of her books on my wish list for a while. I did something I rarely do with an author I've not tried before, and actually ordered 2 of her books together, this one and 'Take Me There'. I started with this one and was very happy with what I found, and glad I took the chance and ordered two of her books.

Sara is smart, like, really smart and she doesn't go for slackers. But she's a romantic as well and searching for a serious love, something that will last, someone who can be her everything. Tobey is a slacker, he doesn't work at anything but still manages to do okay in his exams. He's determined not to go to college and to make it on the music scene with his band anyway. But he's also in love with Sara. He's certain they'll be perfect together and that one of the most popular guys in school, who's just asked her out, isn't nearly good enough for her. When Tobey starts making his interest clear, sparks start to fly.

Okay, so I admit this is a fairly predictable, slightly fluffy, young adult romance, but I really enjoyed it. It's told in alternating POV's from Tobey and Sara, and we get to see the same events through both eyes at times. Which to start with, took a little getting used to as it meant it kept jumping back a little to go forward. But it does work, really well. And it makes for a good way to tell the story of these characters who were easy to like and easy to relate to. The whole high school dynamic, the geeks, the jocks, the popular girls, was all there. It wasn't softened, ignored, or over used. It was just 'this is high school' and could easily be any high school.

The way Sara and Tobey thought, the way they see things, felt very realistic. And without giving anything away, the different male/female attitudes towards sex. And while I did really like both characters, there were times I didn't like them completely. Which for me, is a good thing. Makes them more real, because you never like someone, even someone you love, every second of every day, of every year. It just doesn't happen. I love characters I can get behind and get mad at and forgive. It makes them more real, makes them more interesting and makes for a better book.

I did mention that this book is a little fluffy at times. But that doesn't mean romance is all there is and it doesn't mean it doesn't come with some problems. There are a some little twists, things that could easily happen to anyone, that raise issues they have to deal with. The development of both characters over the course of the book is aided by their friends as well. Both of them have two best friends, and the relationships between them all add to the depth of the book, but also show how friendships can affect things as well. There are little side stories with the friends that we get to see parts of as well, which I liked. It meant they had more purpose than simply 'best friend of...'

Overall, it was a really enjoyable read, and one I struggled to put down. I was rooting for Sara and Tobey separately and together, hoping they'd grow and learn from everything going on and that they'd get what they were looking for. However, the last quarter of the book or so did feel a little rushed. Not badly, but it didn't feel like it quite had the depth the earlier part did. The timeline jumps got bigger and somethings seemed like they got skipped over a little. But the ending did tie things up nicely and satisfied me. It's not a huge issue, but it did let it down just slightly for me. Still a really good read, and exactly the type of book I wanted to read at that moment. Will be getting the rest of Susane's backlist very soon!


The Iron King (Iron Fey)
The Iron King (Iron Fey)
by Julie Kagawa
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Great for fey fans, but not really for me, 3 July 2010
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This is the first book in a YA series, The Iron Fey. I am not very often a big fan of fey central books, and in fact with the exception of Jenna Black's YA Glimmerglass, and Richelle Mead's adult series Dark Swan, I've never more than liked a series/book focusing on fey. So I wasn't too sure about trying this one. I ended up enjoying it a lot though. I don't love it, it's not going to be a favourite, but it is still a good read.

Meghan lives with her mom, step dad and 4 year-old half-brother Ethan. Ethan is often saying that he sees and hears things, things that can't possibly be real. Except Meghan is about to find out they are real, and far more terrifying than she could think. Her sweet sixteen comes with humiliation, followed by the discovery that her little brother could be in danger. All the while being watched by a guy on a black horse, who seems to disappear and reappear at will. Her best friend Robbie, a big time prankster, is being serious and protective, something she's not seen from him before. All this leads to a big discovery. Not only do faeries exist, but Meghan is one of them, daughter of the Summer King. And now the most wanted pawn in faerie.

The book started out well, if a little slow, and built well through the book. There was a lot of action, several good twists and a lot of unanswered questions. Meghan is pretty smart and deals fairly well with what's thrown at her. She grows in confidence and competence as she sees more of the faerie and how they act. Robbie is entertaining and a little crazy at times, but he's loyal to Meghan and a character I really liked. Likewise I really liked Ash, the Winter Court prince, and cait sith Grimalkin. The romance between Meghan and Ash builds slowly and never become a central focus but still got a decent amount of attention.

The faery world is magical and dangerous as it should be. The faery's aren't all sweetness and nice and there is the age old battle between the Winter and Summer Courts. I really like the twist with the Iron fey, and in particular I loved the nicknamed 'pack rats'. The ending was pretty tense with enough conclusion, whilst still leaving a lot open for the next book. Overall it's a really good book, it's well written with the characters and their emotions coming across really well. I really felt for Meghan several times as she had to make some tough decisions. I didn't love it, but I'd still recommend it. If you're someone who, unlike me, really likes fey stories, then this is one you won't want to miss. There is a short story ebook (which I believe is free), Winters Passage, which is set between this one, and the second book The Iron Daughter (out August 2010). I'm looking forward to reading both and seeing how things continue for Meghan.


The Demon's Lexicon
The Demon's Lexicon
by Sarah Rees Brennan
Edition: Paperback
Price: 5.99

4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Just didn't work for me, 26 Jun 2010
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This review is from: The Demon's Lexicon (Paperback)
This is the first book of a trilogy, and it's one I've heard a lot of for a while as being really good. But it was one of those ones I wasn't sure about trying, but figured I'd get to eventually. Then a friend of mine read it and said she thought it was really good so I pushed it up the list, expecting a good read. Sadly, it really wasn't.

The book was predictable from beginning to end. It took me maybe 2 chapters to figure out the 'big secret' that was going to be revealed near the end. It wasn't particularly badly written, but I didn't think much of the characters. They were all pretty flat and generic, nothing about them really standing out to me. The only times I felt there was real life between any of them, was when Nick was arguing with Mae, the girl both brothers fancy (which, really, did they both have to like her?). What I really didn't get, was how Nick didn't figure out something was 'off' so much sooner. It's not like there weren't neon signs along the way. Alan annoyed me a lot. He was ridiculously self sacrificing, too soft, too manipulative. Brother and sister Jamie and Mae weren't a whole lot better.

They went to Nick and Alan looking for help. Jamie had been marked by a demon and they wanted to know how to get rid of it. Nick grudgingly agreed to help only because Alan insisted, which he did mostly because he wanted a date with Mae. Jamie was almost constantly afraid of Nick, which given Nick's behaviour is not surprising, but it was tiring. Mae was constantly switching from snapping at Nick to trying to be kind and helpful to both brothers, whilst protecting her own. Nothing really wrong with her, but again I just didn't feel there was much to her, or any of them.

The book had it's slow moments where it switched to explaining things for a little while, which when I really wasn't enjoying the book too much, dragged. But there is a fair bit of action and it moves along fairly quickly for the most part. I didn't think much of the 'final showdown' because I thought all 4 main characters really weren't smart doing what they did, how they did.

I didn't hate the book or anything, and I did finish it without too much effort. But I was really left with an overall 'meh' sense about it. I didn't much of it at all, and I really doubt I'll be reading the rest of the trilogy. A shame, because I'd been hoping for more from this. But it just really wasn't my cup of tea. I can see why some people like it, but for me, I just could not like the characters enough to care about their reactions to the 'big reveal' at the end. That's what the pulling factor was meant to be, and it just wasn't there for me. Could have been worse, but it could have been so much better.


Magic in the Shadows (Allie Beckstrom Novels)
Magic in the Shadows (Allie Beckstrom Novels)
by Devon Monk
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Loved it., 26 Jun 2010
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This is the third book in the Allie Beckstorm series. I loved the first book, but wasn't so keen on the second one. But this one I loved again. It picks up exactly where book 2, Magic in the Blood, left off: Allie standing in her bathroom hearing her dead fathers voice in her head. Unpleasant. Unsurprisingly, her father, how to deal with him, what he's capable of play a sizable role in this book, but it's far from the only thing she's got to deal with. After the death of Pike, a Hound who was trying to take care of the rest of the Hounds in the city, Allie has stepped up to take his place. While also Hounding a case for the cursed Detective Stotts, meeting with Authority members for the first time, having her best friend Nola staying with her, getting to know Zayvion again, and, oh yeah, dealing with a stone gargoyle she accidentally brought to life. Somehow. Busy girl is Allie, it works for her.

The book is fast paced and there is a lot going on to keep track of, but somehow it all comes together rather than feeling like a lot of different and unnecessary threads there for no reason. Allie is tough as ever working through her issues, memory loss and all the new and ongoing threats she faces. She is constantly being surprised by how much more there is to magic than she, or the general public, knew. And Zayvion, the guy she doesn't remember falling in love with, knows far more than he's saying. I loved the expansion of the world in this one, discovering it alongside Allie, as well as learning more about the Hounds, seeing them work together, how Allie's trying to help them. I loved Davy when we met him in the previous book, and I liked him even more in this one. There is the introduction of a couple new people in this book who I really like as well, none more than Shamus, who is funny, smart and a trouble maker who knows it, and loves it. Seeing Zayvion deal with these new people brought more depth to his character as well. We've not learnt all that much about him before, but we know more now, and meeting his 'friends' was fun and shed yet more light. Allie continues to grow and deal with everything thrown at her, some things better than others, but I love her determination to keep going in the face of fear, to protect those she cares about and to simply keep herself alive.

Overall, this was probably my favourite of the series so far. It's fast and hectic, but works really well with some good character development and additions to the character list as well. I'm really enjoying the series on the whole, I love the world, the way magic works, it's limits, it's costs, how different people deal with those costs. And I also love how Allie's best friend is someone who doesn't use magic at all. It's kind of a nice break to have her around, because she doesn't take any nonsense, takes care of Allie and while she's fine with Allie's use of magic, she doesn't feel the need to use it herself. She's probably the most 'normal' character in the series and I love that, having that element in the books, showing that it's not all magic, somethings can be dealt with just fine without it. Really looking forward to reading the 4th book, Magic on the Storm, soon, seeing more of the Authority and basically more of everything! Great book and really hard to put down.


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