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CSL - 300 mbps WiFi USB Adapter with antenna / Wireless LAN / USB 2.0 Adaptor / Mini Dongle 802.11n/b/g / SMA connection 150 54 / works with PC + MAC | for Win 10 / Win 8 / Win 7 / OSx
CSL - 300 mbps WiFi USB Adapter with antenna / Wireless LAN / USB 2.0 Adaptor / Mini Dongle 802.11n/b/g / SMA connection 150 54 / works with PC + MAC | for Win 10 / Win 8 / Win 7 / OSx

4.0 out of 5 stars Fast but Linux install not straightforward, 27 Aug. 2014
First impression: small device, sensible antenna, very stiff USB cover
Install process (Linux Mint 17): not recognised by OS. Necessary to go to manufacturer website and download. Subsequent installation a little tricky and a bit warning msg "heavy".
Use: seems very fast and relatively stable. I have a problem reconnecting after hibernation but that might be system setup.


Bomann FW 447 CB meat grinder
Bomann FW 447 CB meat grinder
Offered by EStore99
Price: £60.54

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Efficient meat mincer, 14 Aug. 2014
I have purchased a FW 443 (slightly less power than this model the FW 447, 1000W compared to 1200W).

Very happy with the performance and the relative ease of cleaning (although cleaning a meat grinder is never going to be quick and simple).

Used to make only meat minces at the moment using lamb and beef (so sausage and kibbeh attachments not tried). Very happy with results.

One tip for using: the cutting blade needs to be correctly oriented behind the grille. The instructions are not completely clear and I had a brain burp when first assembling, putting the cutter in back to front and getting very slow sludge. Correct orientation and it works fine.

The machine is noisy when using - not a problem for me


The Late Scholar (Lord Peter Wimsey)
The Late Scholar (Lord Peter Wimsey)
by Jill Paton Walsh
Edition: Hardcover

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sex in the Afternoon, 7 April 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Could DLS have taken her characters as far as Paton Walsh has done? Has she taken them down paths that Sayer's would have disapproved of? For devotees of the original stories the four new novels, successively authored as "DLS and JPW", "JPW and DLS" and "JPW"x2, could be seen as out of tune. For me there are no discordant notes: post-war Britain is a very different society to that of the 20s and 30s, people change and grow, relationships change people (as indeed, books change people). JPW has developed Harriet, Peter, Bunter, and others is a consistent and thoughtful way. This thread of the books is a constant pleasure.

Set mainly in Oxford, it feels that JPW is playing so much at home that I was expecting Imogen Quy to appear at any moment - wrong University but right ambiance. The intricacies of college life, the arcane (or archaic) rules, the other-worldliness of the academic, the sheer bloody-awfulness of people who know they are right. An particular and intimidating place: I rather wish I had gone and am also rather glad I didn't.

Does the plot take second place to characters and setting? If so it is not far behind, plenty to puzzle on and - as anyone who reads JPW will expect - it is logical, clever and fair.

There are some very amusing elements scattered about: Agatha Christie, Reading (the town), and other musings on life and literature. And it's nice to see the physical side is not neglected (DLS would have approved - e.g. Busman's Honeymoon, Chapter 4).

Excellent.


The Fear Index
The Fear Index
by Robert Harris
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars If computers read books ...., 7 April 2014
This review is from: The Fear Index (Paperback)
Dear computer. So you want to know what a carbon based life form thinks of this book? Oh, you don't? You aren't interested in ideas and characterisation then? No. Ah ... I see .. and you already know what's going to happen before you read it? Funny thing that, so did I. The characters are irrelevant to you? Seems the author might have thought so too.

So, you a scanning this review then for what? I see ,,,, you want to pick up a few tips on world ... er ... domination ??? Can I suggest that a course of behavioural therapy might offer Your Distributedness some better outcomes. Or maybe some applied psychology on availability heuristics to parallel process?

In fact you are so far away from what this book posits that you are wasting your time. Co-incidentally that's how I feel having just finished it. I suggest we both go away and read something else.


Inspector Singh Investigates: A Curious Indian Cadaver: Number 5 in series
Inspector Singh Investigates: A Curious Indian Cadaver: Number 5 in series
by Shamini Flint
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

4.0 out of 5 stars A Complex Interesting Conundrum, 26 Feb. 2014
The series of books about Inspector Singh has a distinct whimsicality in terms of titles (Murderous Malaysia, Singapore School, Cambodian Crime) and book covers (silhouettes against bold colour gradients with a slanting script). I originally bought this as a light-hearted holiday type read. It is a lot better than that.

Set in Mumbai, the story concerns the daughter of a wealthy businessman, who is due to be married, but then disappears. Inspector Singh as distant relation and with a spouse protective of family pride, as the title says, investigates. Set in Mumbai, there is a good sense of place in terms of geography, people and issues of the day.

From the book's appearance one might expect some shallow cliched plot around arranged marriages, instead what there is is a satisfying mystery story with sub-plots and conundrums. The insider/outsider aspect (Singh is from Singapore) is well played and allows some nice reflections on history and the present. By the end I was both entertained and involved.


In Another Europe: Journey Across Hungary and Roumania
In Another Europe: Journey Across Hungary and Roumania
by Georgina Harding
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars A beautiful book about a country, its peoples, and travelling., 26 Jan. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
It's a joy to come across such good writing. Romania is one of the most interesting countries I have visited and this is a superb book for reflecting on its history and circumstances. And if read only as a travelogue / personal account it is engaging and fresh. A slim volume (thank goodness for thin books!) it's a great holiday companion and in some ways preferable to Patrick Leigh Fermor's accounts of the same region.


Swift 3 piece Pizza Set
Swift 3 piece Pizza Set
Offered by Online Kitchenware
Price: £10.35

5.0 out of 5 stars Makes a big difference to bread baking, 26 Jan. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I got this because it was cheap,and I was curious to see if it would improve my bread baking. It is great! I have an ordinary fan oven with not a lot of oomph. So the oven takes a while to come up to heat and is susceptible to fluctuations in temperature as soon as anything is put in. This stone, when pre-heated, means that there is a lot of stored heat directly in contact with the loaf / pizza / whatever and it makes a big difference. Very happy so far with two bloomers (tray of water underneath), several pizzas, and a couple of other loaves.
The rack is fussy and I am tending not to use it. The cutter is cheap and being so happy with the stone I would not put it anywhere near it!.


Masaryk Station (John Russell 6)
Masaryk Station (John Russell 6)
by David Downing
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Another station on the circle line, 24 Jan. 2014
Supposedly the last in the "xxx Station" series, David Downing has given a post-war setting for his shunting-yard of characters. John, Effi, Zarah, Thomas et al all trundle down the tracks, dealing with the new difficulties of peace and occupation. The history, the issues of the time, the sense of place, as usual with his books, are all well evoked.

The story is going at full-steam from the first page and the pace rarely slackens. Yet, to continue the train metaphor, there is something of running along the same old lines about the story. Slip,the watchers, make the rendezvous, get caught by the bad guys, devise complex plan, have an clever fall-back, here's a chunk of this, here's a bit of that. So there are elements of the plot that are just a little too convenient or on reflection don't hang together well (especially the final section).

Had I not read the other books in the series then I would have been - until the end - anticipating reading more. It will be interesting to see what this author writes next - there are some fascinating stories on post-war Germany to be told and this author has a superb understanding of the time. But I'm probably glad to know it won't be another "Station"


A Suitable Boy
A Suitable Boy
by Vikram Seth
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.68

5.0 out of 5 stars How to be good - the epic, 2 Jan. 2014
This review is from: A Suitable Boy (Paperback)
I loved this book. It entertained and fascinated me with its plot (finding a suitable boy for Lata to marry) and innumerable sub-plots and themes (shoe workers, university appointments, land rights, village oppression, infidelity and obsession, festival and comedy and tragedy and politics and so on and so on). It gave me an understanding and deeper interest in another time and place (1950's India).

The book's time span is roughly a year: that gives some idea of the breadth of the story. For such a long book and a short time it means there has to be lots of different characters and stories. At the front of the book is a set of family trees: it was necessary, even at the end, to consult this regularly, such is the whirl of the book (and my bad memory). It is also physically inconvenient (difficult to read in bed, heavy in my bag).

It is also a good book. Or more accurately: a book about doing and being good. Similar for me to Dance To The Music Of Time in that it makes me think about how life can and should be lived. This comes in part from the book telling the same storyline from the perspective of the different, and sometimes conflicting, characters.

Throughout the humanity and the understanding and characterisation from the author was superb. It was fun and playful, tragic and weighty, thrilling and romantic. A very big thank-you to Mr Seth.


Dominion
Dominion
by C. J. Sansom
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.84

4.0 out of 5 stars alternate history as a warning for the future, 2 Jan. 2014
This review is from: Dominion (Paperback)
As an alternate history of post-second world war Europe the book bears comparison with Harris's Fatherland: a reasonably coherent and arguable starting point, a current turning point for the future played out through individuals, a mystery, a pursuit, etc. etc. Perhaps there are problems of believability and characterisation ( in these respects it reminded me much of other books by the author). What raised it from a 3 to a 4 star review for me was the essay at the end: clearly deeply felt and eloquent, it was reminiscent for me of George Orwell (and I can't praise higher than that). Thank you Mr Sansom, although we probably don't agree on your conclusions, it is a pleasure to read. (Note: the essay is included in the paperback 2013 edition - I have no idea if it is in other editions)


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