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Chris Flanagan "christheartist" (Casorzo, Italy)
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High Windows
High Windows
by Philip Larkin
Edition: Paperback

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Philip Larkin, 'High Windows'., 27 Mar 2009
This review is from: High Windows (Paperback)
Published in 1974 ten years after the success of 'The Whitson Weddings' this collection shows a much darker side to Larkin. Death, and the fear of death, are the subject of many of the poems, although in Larkin's skilled hands the results are uplifting and life-enhancing.

As ever, loss is a central theme, especially in such poems as, 'Going, Going' ,'Sad Steps' and 'This Be The Verse', but then Larkin turns round and gives us explosions of joy such as 'Show Saturday' and the title of the collection, 'High Windows'.

Taken together with 'The Whitson Weddings', 'High Windows' this is a fine introduction to some of his finest, and most profound poetry.


The Whitsun Weddings (Faber Poetry)
The Whitsun Weddings (Faber Poetry)
by Philip Larkin
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Philip Larkin, 'The Whitson Weddings'., 27 Mar 2009
First published in 1964 this collection established Larkin as one of Britain's finest poets since John Betjeman. It contains some of his most well loved poems such as 'Dockery and Son' and 'An Arundel Tomb' as well the tour de force of 'The Whitson Weddings' itself, beautifully observed with Larkin's characteristic detached longing.

Containing just enough poems so as not to overwhelm the reader, this is the sort of book you want to carry around with you, to dip into when the mood takes you. Larkin's clear language doesn't confuse with vague classical references or condescending phraseology. Instead you get some of the best English poetry written at a time when many of the traditions and old ways were being lost for good.

As an introduction to Philip Larkin, this collection cannot be bettered.


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