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Reviews Written by
H. Llewelyn "Hugh Llewelyn the Welshman" (Bristol, England)
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A=mh2
A=mh2
Price: 12.87

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What's this all about, then?, 18 Mar 2011
This review is from: A=mh2 (Audio CD)
I, too, bought this vinyl album in 1969 but can't for the life of me remember why! I may have seen them live, but can't remember. It was the 60's, you know, and I was a student. But to be absolutely honest, I'm afraid that the only substance I was under the influence of was Watney's Starlight as nothing stronger was available in the Union Bar at Swansea. Not even Watney's Red Barrel - now that's scraping the bottom of. Perhaps I looked too innocent to be corrupted. But listening to this album it was easy to pretend I was stoned. This album certainly is "different" and all my friends at the time thought I'd made an inspired choice - even though they had never heard of Clark-Hutchinson! Incredible musicianship and highly original numbers. Of it's time but still a very enjoyable listen. Even sober.


Bert and John
Bert and John

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The time has come - but not gone, 18 Mar 2011
This review is from: Bert and John (Audio CD)
I bought the vinyl album - called "Stepping Stones" - when a 6th former without knowing anything about either Bert Jansch or John Renbourne but curious to see what they sounded like. I was aware that Jansch was a bit of a cult even then (no typo there, incidentally). And I was amazed: at it's simplicity - in its short, sharp songs - and it's complexity - in it's incredibly accomplished guitar playing. Jansch's playing simply defies description. He is truely unique. All tracks are superb but for me "The Time has Come" is the most shuddering. Although it isn't exactly PC as it seems to be about the singer saying goodbye to his lover because he is going on tour - the US perhaps? - and really wants to be unencumbered so he can enjoy the groupies without a conscience. That's my take on it, anyway! All good, clean fun.


The Pentangle
The Pentangle
Price: 9.17

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Pentangular perfection, 18 Mar 2011
This review is from: The Pentangle (Audio CD)
I was a very early fan of Pentangle from listening to John Peel and was already a firm fan of Bert Jansch - possibly the most original folk guitarist of all time. And Jacqui MacShee has the sweetest voice of all three of the great Brit female folk singers of the late 60's/70's - though Sandy Denny remains the most characterful and moving for me and Maddy Prior has maybe the best compromise between sweetness and "movingness" - if there is such a word! I saw Pentangle live at the Afon Lido in a day long festival when they were joint top of the bill with, of all people, Pink Floyd! Both were great live. Whilst I bought most of the Pentangle vinyl LPs at the time, this remains my favourite. And the naff titled "Pentangling" is electric Brit folk at it's most imaginitive and best. The bonus tracks don't add anything much, though.


Mark-Almond (1st album + bonus tracks)
Mark-Almond (1st album + bonus tracks)
Price: 10.99

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Soft Sell, 18 Mar 2011
Why is it that whenever I google Mark Almond I get Soft Cell? It seems to be so difficult to find the CD of this album. Having seen John Mark & Johnny Almond when with John Mayall (the Three Johns - what a name for a supergroup!), I was transfixed by Johnny Almond's sax playing. I bought this as a vinyl LP when it first came out and it immediately became one of my favourite albums. Ultimate Cool. Having - eventually - found the CD on Amazon and played it for the first time in decades I found that I still liked it. Soft Jazz! What is interesting about this CD is that it is not simply the first album - which remains a very good album, if perhaps a little dated now. But surprisingly - and this isn't imediately obvious when looking at the cover - is that this CD includes as bonus tracks all bar one track of the second MD album and one from the third. Curious. But these bonus tracks - exhibiting excellent musicianship though they do - simply do not inspire anything like the first album's tracks do. They are rather ordinary, the truth be told. The only exception I would make is "Solitude", which is satisfactorily soporific. Or is it soporifically satisfying? Haven't got the energy to decide which, after listening to "Solitude".


Year
Year
Price: 12.43

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Post Steeleye Prior, 13 Mar 2011
This review is from: Year (Audio CD)
Whilst Steeleye Span were one of my favourite Brit electric folk bands (with Fairport Convention, Pentangle and, uh, Trees - I know, you've never heard of them), after she left Steeleye, Maddy Prior's career seemed to change direction several times. This album has some elements of electric folk but is otherwise uncategorisable (if there's such a word). But it is hugely enjoyable and "What had you for supper, my own darlin' boy" - perhaps the most folky of the tracks on here - is desperately sad. It is basically a song about a mother singing to her son who is dying of cancer! This description may appear somewhat sentimental but this song is oh so moving and Prior's crystal-clear voice is suited to it perfectly. This album is worth buying for this track alone. But the other tracks ain't half bad either!


The Turning Point
The Turning Point
Price: 7.21

5.0 out of 5 stars Mayall - but not as you know it., 13 Mar 2011
This review is from: The Turning Point (Audio CD)
Although a great fan of Eric Clapton, Peter Green, Mick Taylor et al, and despite being an owner of several Bluesbreakers LPs, I was never as great a fan of John Mayall as I was of Cream, Fleetwood Mac or the Stones. But when I saw this particular line-up of the Bluesbreakers at Bristol's Colston Hall in 1970 they were simply wonderful - and nothing like any other Bluesbreakers line-up before or since. Johnny Almond's sax and flute playing was hair raising when I saw them live and this is captured superbly on this album - "California" in particular. Just put the light out and close your eyes and it will transport you to that fantasy land that was 1970 California, where I just happened to spend part of my summer that year (it was somewhat of a contrast to the South Wales Valleys).


Live Cream
Live Cream
Price: 5.67

5.0 out of 5 stars Cream that hasn't curdled, 13 Mar 2011
This review is from: Live Cream (Audio CD)
Vol I is arguably the best of the two Live Cream volumes as NSU, Sweet Wine and Rollin' & Tumblin' are just so exiting - and still are all these years later. They represent some of Cream's best live work (only Steppin' Out on Vol II and, of course, Spoonful and Crossroads on "Wheels of Fire Live at the Filmore" are better) - but what on earth is "Hey Lawdy Mama" doing here? Thankfully, this is a very short track. This album shows what an amazingly exiting guitar player Clapton was - never replicated when he left Cream, unfortunately. Best listened too slightly inebriated so you won't be too embarressed when you pogo with your zimmer in front of your daughters' boyfriends.


Valentyne Suite
Valentyne Suite
Price: 10.91

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Kettle Boils, 13 Mar 2011
This review is from: Valentyne Suite (Audio CD)
I first saw Colusseum at (yet again) Swansea University in 1969 and thought James Litherland's ethereal voice was the epitomy of jazz-rock. Simply wonderful. When he left and, eventually, Chris Fartlowe (sorry, genuine typo there but I'll leave it in as it represents my view of Chris Farlowe's vocals perfectly) joined, this ended my interest in Colosseum, I'm afraid, even though I'm a fan of Dick-Heckstall-Smith's superb sax playing. I just can't stand Chris Farlowe's voice - even though many regard his voice as the epitomy of jazz-rock! For me, this album (and the previous "Those who are about to die salute you") represent the best Colosseum era. Rather sacriligously, I prefer the first four tracks to the perhaps over-long Valentyne's Suite. "The Kettle" is just a "boiling" opener but for me "Elegy" is unmatched. Litherland's voice is just heart rending on this. For a song which is quite fast paced, it somehow manages to be so sad. And the sudden ending is unique - but is just right for this song. Magical. Definately a Desert Island Disc for me.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 10, 2011 6:14 PM BST


Ahead Rings Out
Ahead Rings Out
Price: 6.44

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Pig brings home the bacon, 13 Mar 2011
This review is from: Ahead Rings Out (Audio CD)
Variously known as The Pig or The Blods, I first saw them at Swansea University c.1969 and thought they were one of the best blues-jazz-rock bands I had seen so immediately bought the vinyl album. I have now bought the CD and was amazed to find that the best track on it - the rocking "See My Way" wasn't on the UK version I owned. What a loss that was. It's even better than the classic "Dear Jill". The bonus tracks on this album I can take or leave - with the exception of "Backwash" which was on the vinyl album I owned and which I like very much. A truely superb album. But, being Welsh, and having had an Aunty Blod and a cat named Blodwyn, how did the name "Blodwyn Pig" come about? I wish I knew.


Chulahoma
Chulahoma
Offered by Fulfillment Express
Price: 6.52

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Future Nostalgia, 13 Mar 2011
This review is from: Chulahoma (Audio CD)
Being a relic of the 60's Brit Blues-Rock era and a fan of Fleetwood Mac/Chicken Shack/John Mayall blues (a reference to Liverpool Scene if anyone can remember them), I was amazed when I heard this EP and thought I must have been transported back in time. I am sure I will feel as nostalgic about this album in 40 years time (even though I will be 100) as I do about Cream or Ten Years After albums now. That they're Yanks rather than Brits is just a technicality. Although I thought I knew many of the old black blues artists, I had never heard of Junior Kimbrough (which only goes to show what little I know) so had no idea what to expect when I first heard this EP. But from the opening track "Keep Your Hands Off My Woman" (what a brilliant title! and it's an absolute electric blues gem) to the last "My Mind is Ramblin'" (which particularly resonates with me an my stage of decreptitude) the whole album is a real treat. Not one dud. If you're someone from my era who just doesn't know what to buy of current music, buy this. You won't be disappointed.


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