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Gerald Parker "Gerald Parker" (Rouyn-Noranda, QC., Dominion of Canada)

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Nos 18 ans
Nos 18 ans
Dvd ~ Valentine Catzéflis, Michel Bla Théo Frilet
Offered by Empor-online
Price: £9.81

4.0 out of 5 stars Affairs of the Heart (and of Young, Willing, and Aroused Bodies) among French Youth, 18 Oct 2014
This review is from: Nos 18 ans (DVD)
This endearing romantic comedy, "Nos 18 ans" (known in English, to the extent that it is at all, as "School's out"), has a lot of charm, obviously for young audiences. It is so well conceived (as based on a prior Italian movie), written, directed, and acted, with superior camera work, that more mature audiences, too, who surely will forgive these youths their coltish indiscretions, will enjoy it as well.

The story, set in France but, refreshingly, not in Paris, centres upon Lucas (played by Théo Frilet, a lad of lushly beautiful good looks) who insults and cusses out his professor, dour, strict, seemingly humourless Monsieur Martineau, on the last day of school, only to find out that he is going to have to face oral exams with none other, unexpectedly, than Prof. Martineau himself! Not surprisingly, gloom ensues in Lucas' mind.

It gives away nothing, since this turn of circumstances is mentioned on the DVD container's very container and is obvious early on in the movie, that the girl with whom Lucas falls hopelessly and deliriously in love is none other than Prof. Martieau's very attractive daughter, Clémence, a role taken by Valentine Catzéflis, who rather resembles the young Brooke Shields, but who really is prettier and more personable than that. The professor realises the boy's predicament much sooner than Lucas does, which makes for some wryly amusing scenes between the two. At film's end, Lucas, Prof. Martineau, and Clémence come out happily reunited and reconciled with the young pair's prospects (and Lucas passes his oral ordeal).

There are other youthful couples, too, whose frisky adventures figure into this delightful motion picture. Arthur Dupont plays the part of Maxime, one of Lucas' school mates. Maxime is a handsome young dude with more sex drive even than the other teenage males among Lucas' friends, one who has one wonderfully comic turn following upon another. The brashly saucy lad's raging hormones propel him not only into impregnating his girlfriend, but also into having a torrid affair, as well, with her underage sister. Maxime is all importuningly sad-beagle-puppy-dog-faced contrition, to hilariously heart-tugging effect, as he pleads with, and at last wins the pardon of, the sister of his own age. Dupont, the highly gifted actor who assumes that role, making the most of every comical opportunity which it affords, is perhaps more famous for having played the seductively good-looking but scandalously perverse bisexual rock musician who mixes things up to violent effect in a more celebrated film, "One to Another". Here in "Nos 18 ans", Dupont delivers first class comic acting, fully realising Maxime's capacity to amuse the viewer and also to excite sympathy for the young man's plight.

The dialogue is in French, with English subtitles. "Nos 18 ans" (T.V.A. Films TVA-00533 being the edition viewed) is one youth culture film (French youth culture, all to the better!) which should appeal to a wide and varied audience.


NOS 18 ANS-Catzeflis v,Piaton j...
NOS 18 ANS-Catzeflis v,Piaton j...
Offered by Funkingdom
Price: £34.75

4.0 out of 5 stars These Energetic and Sexually Aroused French Teenagers Romp Their Way Friskily into Early Adulthood, 18 Oct 2014
This endearing romantic comedy, "Nos 18 ans" (known in English, to the extent that it is at all, as "School's out"), has a lot of charm, obviously for young audiences. It is so well conceived (as based on a prior Italian movie), written, directed, and acted, with superior camera work, that more mature audiences, too, who surely will forgive these youths their coltish indiscretions, will enjoy it as well.

The story, set in France but, refreshingly, not in Paris, centres upon Lucas (played by Théo Frilet, a lad of lushly beautiful good looks) who insults and cusses out his professor, dour, strict, seemingly humourless Monsieur Martineau, on the last day of school, only to find out that he is going to have to face oral exams with none other, unexpectedly, than Prof. Martineau himself! Not surprisingly, gloom ensues in Lucas' mind.

It gives away nothing, since this turn of circumstances is mentioned on the DVD container's very container and is obvious early on in the movie, that the girl with whom Lucas falls hopelessly and deliriously in love is none other than Prof. Martieau's very attractive daughter, Clémence, a role taken by Valentine Catzéflis, who rather resembles the young Brooke Shields, but who really is prettier and more personable than that. The professor realises the boy's predicament much sooner than Lucas does, which makes for some wryly amusing scenes between the two. At film's end, Lucas, Prof. Martineau, and Clémence come out happily reunited and reconciled with the young pair's prospects (and Lucas passes his oral ordeal).

There are other youthful couples, too, whose frisky adventures figure into this delightful motion picture. Arthur Dupont plays the part of Maxime, one of Lucas' school mates. Maxime is a handsome young dude with more sex drive even than the other teenage males among Lucas' friends, one who has one wonderfully comic turn following upon another. The brashly saucy lad's raging hormones propel him not only into impregnating his girlfriend, but also into having a torrid affair, as well, with her underage sister. Maxime is all importuningly sad-beagle-puppy-dog-faced contrition, to hilariously heart-tugging effect, as he pleads with, and at last wins the pardon of, the sister of his own age. Dupont, the highly gifted actor who assumes that role, making the most of every comical opportunity which it affords, is perhaps more famous for having played the seductively good-looking but scandalously perverse bisexual rock musician who mixes things up to violent effect in a more celebrated film, "One to Another". Here in "Nos 18 ans", Dupont delivers first class comic acting, fully realising Maxime's capacity to amuse the viewer and also to excite sympathy for the young man's plight.

The dialogue is in French, with English subtitles. "Nos 18 ans" (T.V.A. Films TVA-00533 being the edition viewed) is one youth culture film (French youth culture, all to the better!) which should appeal to a wide and varied audience.


Vigo - Passion For Life [DVD]
Vigo - Passion For Life [DVD]
Dvd ~ Romane Bohringer
Price: £10.30

4.0 out of 5 stars Jean Vigo Was a Major, Highly Creative, and Ideologically Adventurous Film-Maker, and Here is a Biopic in Hommage to Him!, 12 Oct 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
"Vigo: Passion for Life" (for the short one that Vigo lived!) is a free retelling (by director Julien Temple) of the life of French filmmaker, Jean Vigo, who died so young that he was able to make only a small number of films, during the 1930s. The story of his life and of his love for Lydu, the woman of his life, in this biopic is recounted rather rhapsodically but quite beautifully and sensitively. Vigo was dogged by difficulties which his radical parentage and his own leftist convictions posed for a career in so public an art as cinema. Worse, though, was the life-threatening affliction that Vigo had to bear with frail health. He died at only 29, of septicemia.

James Frain takes the title role. This motion picture is one dating from relatively early in the British actor's career, a circumstance that favours the portrayal of the young man Vigo, for Frain, being ever elegantly sleek of build (but having dieted somewhat drastically, anyway, to play this role, in order to appear yet more "beauteously skinny"), curly-headed, and (still at the time of this movie) smoothly fresh-faced of complexion, he naturally conveys alike the youth as well as the touch-and-go health that made Jean Vigo's life such a physical struggle as he lived out the ardours of devoting his cinematic career to difficult subjects (by standards both of then and now) and to such highly original treatments of anything that Vigo's movies are about. (Although Frain's looks, even with the weight loss, only in a rather general way resemble those of the real-life Vigo, that is not a matter of great importance in so imaginative biopic as this one is.)

The film takes many risks with the moviegoer's capacity to follow the story, which does cohere, but not in any obvious way. The movie is, really, quite beautifully filmed and is a joy to the viewer's eyes.

There seems to be no North American DVD or Blu-Ray edition of this motion picture. A good U.K. edition, however, among the various disc (and some VHS) editions of it which have been released in, variously, English or French, is suitable for those who have equipment that can handle the European DVD's PAL standard, is Park Circus VFD-4-1889, presenting the film in English, without any subtitles or special features (beyond the inclusion of the film's trailer).

Recommended for the adventurously and romantically minded!


Vigo - Passion For Life [VHS] [1999]
Vigo - Passion For Life [VHS] [1999]
VHS

4.0 out of 5 stars Poetic Biopic Devoted to the Life, Art, and Love of French Radical Film-maker Jean Vigo, 12 Oct 2014
"Vigo: Passion for Life" (for the short one that Vigo lived!) is a free retelling (by director Julien Temple) of the life of French filmmaker, Jean Vigo, who died so young that he was able to make only a small number of films, during the 1930s. The story of his life and of his love for Lydu, the woman of his life, in this biopic is recounted rather rhapsodically but quite beautifully and sensitively. Vigo was dogged by difficulties which his radical parentage and his own leftist convictions posed for a career in so public an art as cinema. Worse, though, was the life-threatening affliction that Vigo had to bear with frail health. He died at only 29, of septicemia.

James Frain takes the title role. This motion picture is one dating from relatively early in the British actor's career, a circumstance that favours the portrayal of the young man Vigo, for Frain, being ever elegantly sleek of build (but having dieted somewhat drastically, anyway, to play this role, in order to appear yet more "beauteously skinny"), curly-headed, and (still at the time of this movie) smoothly fresh-faced of complexion, he naturally conveys alike the youth as well as the touch-and-go health that made Jean Vigo's life such a physical struggle as he lived out the ardours of devoting his cinematic career to difficult subjects (by standards both of then and now) and to such highly original treatments of anything that Vigo's movies are about. (Although Frain's looks, even with the weight loss, only in a rather general way resemble those of the real-life Vigo, that is not a matter of great importance in so imaginative biopic as this one is.)

The film takes many risks with the moviegoer's capacity to follow the story, which does cohere, but not in any obvious way. The movie is, really, quite beautifully filmed and is a joy to the viewer's eyes.

There seems to be no North American DVD or Blu-Ray edition of this motion picture. A good U.K. edition, however, among the various disc (and some VHS) editions of it which have been released in, variously, English or French, is suitable for those who have equipment that can handle the European DVD's PAL standard, is Park Circus VFD-4-1889, presenting the film in English, without any subtitles or special features (beyond the inclusion of the film's trailer).

Recommended for the adventurously and romantically minded!


Beethoven-Fidelio-Maazel
Beethoven-Fidelio-Maazel

5.0 out of 5 stars Maazel's Way with Beethoven's "Fidelio" Puts Dramatic Values Front and Forement, 11 Oct 2014
Many critics, and the listeners whom they influence, downgrade the worth of this supremely exciting recording of Beethoven's "Fidelio" (in the usual final version of the score). Well, they are wrong! It is true that Otto Klemperer's recording is very beautiful, and it features the incomparable Jon Vickers as Florestan among the well cast soloists, but even Klemperer's recording reeks too much of the overly-devout, oratorio-like quality of far too many performances (whether recorded in the studio or in the theatre) of this work. "Fidelio" is an OPERA (even if there is some spoken dialogue), a real music drama, NOT an oratorio or cantata!

Loren Maazel really digs into the music, driving the music forward relentlessly to thrillingly theatrical effect! There is no doubting, under Maazel's baton, that indeed this is a stage work, one as fervently dramatic as any in the standard repertoire. Bergit Nilsson's voice, singing Leonore, rings out with blazingly heroic impact; she is heard in some live recordings of "Fidelio", under other conductors' direction, interpreting her part at higher levels of histrionic intensity than in this studio recording under Maazel's direction, but most buyers will prefer Maazel's excitingly conducted recording with her in the role in stereo sound that so vividly has more sonic "presence". Her partner, tenor James McCracken, in subsequent recordings that he made seldom sounded so good as he does here; as Florestan he powerfully rises to the considerable challenge of partnering a soprano of so clarion a voice as Nilsson.

Yes, Klemperer, and some other conductors too, have shaped the score's orchestral detail more exquisitely, but nearly always in musical performance contexts that vitiate the dramatic impact which Beethoven surely intended. Maazel, on the other hand, while perhaps at times driving rough-shod over some minutiae of orchestral detail (at least compared to "Dr. Klemps"), ignites the thrilling drama that so imbues this great music. Okay, get the Klemperer recording too (which has many beauties and is sung by a superb cast of vocal soloists), but buy Maazel's recording first!


Beethoven: Fidelio
Beethoven: Fidelio
Price: £10.52

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This Recording of "Fidelio" Remains the Touchstone of How to Draw Maximal Dramatic Impact from Beethoven's Score, 11 Oct 2014
This review is from: Beethoven: Fidelio (Audio CD)
Many critics, and the listeners whom they influence, downgrade the worth of this supremely exciting recording of Beethoven's "Fidelio" (in the usual final version of the score). Well, they are wrong! It is true that Otto Klemperer's recording is very beautiful, and it features the incomparable Jon Vickers as Florestan among the well cast soloists, but even Klemperer's recording reeks too much of the overly-devout, oratorio-like quality of far too many performances (whether recorded in the studio or in the theatre) of this work. "Fidelio" is an OPERA (even if there is some spoken dialogue), a real music drama, NOT an oratorio or cantata!

Loren Maazel really digs into the music, driving the music forward relentlessly to thrillingly theatrical effect! There is no doubting, under Maazel's baton, that indeed this is a stage work, one as fervently dramatic as any in the standard repertoire. Bergit Nilsson's voice, singing Leonore, rings out with blazingly heroic impact; she is heard in some live recordings of "Fidelio", under other conductors' direction, interpreting her part at higher levels of histrionic intensity than in this studio recording under Maazel's direction, but most buyers will prefer Maazel's excitingly conducted recording with her in the role in stereo sound that so vividly has more sonic "presence". Her partner, tenor James McCracken, in subsequent recordings that he made seldom sounded so good as he does here; as Florestan he powerfully rises to the considerable challenge of partnering a soprano of so clarion a voice as Nilsson.

Yes, Klemperer, and some other conductors too, have shaped the score's orchestral detail more exquisitely, but nearly always in musical performance contexts that vitiate the dramatic impact which Beethoven surely intended. Maazel, on the other hand, while perhaps at times driving rough-shod over some minutiae of orchestral detail (at least compared to "Dr. Klemps"), ignites the thrilling drama that so imbues this great music. Okay, get the Klemperer recording too (which has many beauties and is sung by a superb cast of vocal soloists), but buy Maazel's recording first!


Webster's New World College Dictionary, Fourth Edition (Book with CD-ROM) (Edition 4) by The Editors of the Webster's New World Dictionaries [Hardcover(2004??]
Webster's New World College Dictionary, Fourth Edition (Book with CD-ROM) (Edition 4) by The Editors of the Webster's New World Dictionaries [Hardcover(2004??]
by N/A
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars This Is One of the Greatest Single Volume Dictionaries of English as Used in the U. S. of A. To Be Had, Used, and Cherished!, 8 Oct 2014
I long have used the Webster's New World Dictionary of American English, the most recommendable and comprehensive of its variants being any designated for "college" (in U.S.A. lingo including "university") use. The edition which most people usually think of as the first edition of this dictionary was the only English dictionary which students at the college where I did my freshman and sophomore years of study, in the mid-1960s, were permitted to cite as their lexical authority (the then recently debased "Collegiate" dictionary from Merriam-Webster, having been prime among the dictionaries that students were forbidden to use in writing their papers and assignments). There had been forerunners of the supremely fine Webster's New World Dictionary under the same title, published decades before the 1950s, under the imprint of World Publishers, but those earlier ones did not so deserve to be considered the first edition (which seems to have gone through printings from 1954 or so to 1968, of which the one that I first obtained was the 1964 printing). I have acquired and used every edition of this dictionary, right up to and including the fourth and now the fifth editions. I have retained each much-loved, well-used edition, keeping them in various rooms of my house, along with some other favoured dictionaries, for ready resort near desks, tables, or chairs where I most often read or write.

An interesting feature, by the way, of the Second College Edition, at least of the sturdy "Special School Printing" of it which I own, is a flexi-disc (33.3 r.p.m., 7 in.) included with it that bears the title upon it, "New World Phonoguide: an Audio Supplement to the Pronunciation Guide and Phonetic Symbols" which could be of considerable help to users for whom English is a second (third, etc.) language. I have not seen this helpful disc in other editions of this dictionary as I own copies of them. As for the fourth college edition, one or some printing(s) of it, including this one, come(s) with an accompanying CD-ROM.

Each edition of the Webster's New World Dictionary has improved on the one that preceded it. Alas, some dictionaries, e.g., those benighted "Collegiate" dictionaries from Merriam-Webster, which fell from grace when they began to be based on the excessively permissive Webster's Third New International Dictionary, Merriam-Webster's unabridged dictionary which had displaced the rock-solid and far more trustworthy Webster's New Twentieth Century Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged 2nd Edition, on which earlier and better Merriam-Webster's "Collegiate" dictionary editions formerly and more happily had been based. Similar decline also has beset numerous other dictionaries which have not undergone wise or sufficient revision, leading to the lessening of quality or of reliability as later editions appear, when compared to former ones. The most admirable (of many good) qualities of the Webster's New World Dictionary is the sane approach to matters of word usage; while this dictionary is "prescriptive" in indicating what pronunciations and definitions are normative, it does give alternate ones that are common but less "proper", so far as American usage is concerned. It includes an healthy amount of words in informal English and slang; unlike the too prim-and-proper Funk and Wagnall dictionaries or the American Heritage Dictionary, both quite fine but rather too staid, the Webster's New World Dictionary does not purge such words and locutions of less-then-high-pedigree from the lexicon, but, rather, admits them while it very helpfully indicates their level of English usage admissibility or unacceptability for inclusion in formal writing or speaking. Each subsequent edition of the Webster's New World Dictionary, too, has undergone a thorough updating to add new words, technical or otherwise, to the vocabulary of the language.

A single, general-purpose college or desk-reference dictionary, even so admirably aimed at sophisticated adult level as the Webster's New World College Dictionary is, will not suffice to fulfil all requirements. For one thing, a truly unabridged dictionary, usually multi-volume, is good to have around for exceptional needs; I have several such dictionaries, of which, among them, I particularly commend "The Random House Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged", Second Edition, in one humongous and heavily oversized volume (of xlii, 2478, 32 p.). Also, one or a few dictionaries which correspond(s) to Commonwealth usage is (or are) important for non-American readers to possess and to use. Being here in Canada, I tend most to rely upon British dictionaries for spelling (especially Cassell's, Chamber's, and Harrap's fine recent editions of their respective dictionaries) and on specifically Canadian dictionaries (most notably the impeccable Gage dictionaries) for pronunciation or for peculiarly Canadian use and origin, but for definitions, I always have preferred the best American dictionaries, especially the various editions of Webster's New World Dictionary.

The Amazon buyer cannot go wrong in purchasing any variant of the Webster's New World Dictionary. If he cannot afford or find the latest edition, any of the previous "college" editions is quite suitable and reliable for everyday use. Go for it!


Webster's New World College Dictionary, Fourth Edition (Book with CD-ROM) 4th (fourth) Edition by The Editors of the Webster's New World Dictionaries published by Webster's New World (2004)
Webster's New World College Dictionary, Fourth Edition (Book with CD-ROM) 4th (fourth) Edition by The Editors of the Webster's New World Dictionaries published by Webster's New World (2004)
by N/A
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars Any Edition, Especially from the Third One onwards, of Webster's New World College Dictionary Offers Best in U.S. Lexicography, 8 Oct 2014
I long have used the Webster's New World Dictionary of American English, the most recommendable and comprehensive of its variants being any designated for "college" (in U.S.A. lingo including "university") use. The edition which most people usually think of as the first edition of this dictionary was the only English dictionary which students at the college where I did my freshman and sophomore years of study, in the mid-1960s, were permitted to cite as their lexical authority (the then recently debased "Collegiate" dictionary from Merriam-Webster, having been prime among the dictionaries that students were forbidden to use in writing their papers and assignments). There had been forerunners of the supremely fine Webster's New World Dictionary under the same title, published decades before the 1950s, under the imprint of World Publishers, but those earlier ones did not so deserve to be considered the first edition (which seems to have gone through printings from 1954 or so to 1968, of which the one that I first obtained was the 1964 printing). I have acquired and used every edition of this dictionary, right up to and including the fourth and now the fifth editions. I have retained each much-loved, well-used edition, keeping them in various rooms of my house, along with some other favoured dictionaries, for ready resort near desks, tables, or chairs where I most often read or write.

An interesting feature, by the way, of the Second College Edition, at least of the sturdy "Special School Printing" of it which I own, is a flexi-disc (33.3 r.p.m., 7 in.) included with it that bears the title upon it, "New World Phonoguide: an Audio Supplement to the Pronunciation Guide and Phonetic Symbols" which could be of considerable help to users for whom English is a second (third, etc.) language. I have not seen this helpful disc in other editions of this dictionary as I own copies of them. As for the fourth college edition, one or some printing(s) of it come(s) with an accompanying CD-ROM.

Each edition of the Webster's New World Dictionary has improved on the one that preceded it. Alas, some dictionaries, e.g., those benighted "Collegiate" dictionaries from Merriam-Webster, which fell from grace when they began to be based on the excessively permissive Webster's Third New International Dictionary, Merriam-Webster's unabridged dictionary which had displaced the rock-solid and far more trustworthy Webster's New Twentieth Century Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged 2nd Edition, on which earlier and better Merriam-Webster's "Collegiate" dictionary editions formerly and more happily had been based. Similar decline also has beset numerous other dictionaries which have not undergone wise or sufficient revision, leading to the lessening of quality or of reliability as later editions appear, when compared to former ones. The most admirable (of many good) qualities of the Webster's New World Dictionary is the sane approach to matters of word usage; while this dictionary is "prescriptive" in indicating what pronunciations and definitions are normative, it does give alternate ones that are common but less "proper", so far as American usage is concerned. It includes an healthy amount of words in informal English and slang; unlike the too prim-and-proper Funk and Wagnall dictionaries or the American Heritage Dictionary, both quite fine but rather too staid, the Webster's New World Dictionary does not purge such words and locutions of less-then-high-pedigree from the lexicon, but, rather, admits them while it very helpfully indicates their level of English usage admissibility or unacceptability for inclusion in formal writing or speaking. Each subsequent edition of the Webster's New World Dictionary, too, has undergone a thorough updating to add new words, technical or otherwise, to the vocabulary of the language.

A single, general-purpose college or desk-reference dictionary, even so admirably aimed at sophisticated adult level as the Webster's New World College Dictionary is, will not suffice to fulfil all requirements. For one thing, a truly unabridged dictionary, usually multi-volume, is good to have around for exceptional needs; I have several such dictionaries, of which, among them, I particularly commend "The Random House Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged", Second Edition, in one humongous and heavily oversized volume (of xlii, 2478, 32 p.). Also, one or a few dictionaries which correspond(s) to Commonwealth usage is (or are) important for non-American readers to possess and to use. Being here in Canada, I tend most to rely upon British dictionaries for spelling (especially Cassell's, Chamber's, and Harrap's fine recent editions of their respective dictionaries) and on specifically Canadian dictionaries (most notably the impeccable Gage dictionaries) for pronunciation or for peculiarly Canadian use and origin, but for definitions, I always have preferred the best American dictionaries, especially the various editions of Webster's New World Dictionary.

The Amazon buyer cannot go wrong in purchasing any variant of the Webster's New World Dictionary. If he cannot afford or find the latest edition, any of the previous "college" editions is quite suitable and reliable for everyday use. Go for it!


Webster's New World College Dictionary
Webster's New World College Dictionary
by Victoria Neufeldt
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars This Third Edition of the Famous Webster's New World Dictionary Suffices One's Needs Almost as Well as the 4th or 5th Edition, 8 Oct 2014
I long have used the Webster's New World Dictionary of American English, the most recommendable and comprehensive of its variants being any designated for "college" (in U.S.A. lingo including "university") use. The edition which most people usually think of as the first edition of this dictionary was the only English dictionary which students at the college where I did my freshman and sophomore years of study, in the mid-1960s, were permitted to cite as their lexical authority (the then recently debased "Collegiate" dictionary from Merriam-Webster, having been prime among the dictionaries that students were forbidden to use in writing their papers and assignments). There had been forerunners of the supremely fine Webster's New World Dictionary under the same title, published decades before the 1950s, under the imprint of World Publishers, but those earlier ones did not so deserve to be considered the first edition (which seems to have gone through printings from 1954 or so to 1968, of which the one that I first obtained was the 1964 printing).

I have acquired and used every edition of this dictionary, right up to and including the fourth and now the fifth editions. I have retained each much-loved, well-used edition, keeping them in various rooms of my house, along with some other favoured dictionaries, for ready resort near desks, tables, or chairs where I most often read or write. For those who specifically have a preference for the Third Edition, the purchaser from an Amazon WWW site should be aware that Prentice Hall published, for that edition itself (nice to have, but not affecting the overall desirability of it in any major way), a 1994 Update of the Third College Edition in, of course, 1994 (of which the ISBN number for it, "thumb-indexed", is 0-671-88243-0, and, "plain-edged", is 0-671-88289-9).

An interesting feature, by the way, of the Second College Edition, at least of the sturdy "Special School Printing" of it which I own, is a flexi-disc (33.3 r.p.m., 7 in.) included with it that bears the title upon it, "New World Phonoguide: an Audio Supplement to the Pronunciation Guide and Phonetic Symbols" which could be of considerable help to users for whom English is a second (third, etc.) language. I have not seen this helpful disc in other editions of this dictionary as I own copies of them. As for the fourth college edition, one or some printing(s) of it come(s) with an accompanying CD-ROM.

Each edition of the Webster's New World Dictionary has improved on the one that preceded it. Alas, some dictionaries, e.g., those benighted "Collegiate" dictionaries from Merriam-Webster, which fell from grace when they began to be based on the excessively permissive Webster's Third New International Dictionary, Merriam-Webster's unabridged dictionary which had displaced the rock-solid and far more trustworthy Webster's New Twentieth Century Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged 2nd Edition, on which earlier and better Merriam-Webster's "Collegiate" dictionary editions formerly and more happily had been based. Similar decline also has beset numerous other dictionaries which have not undergone wise or sufficient revision, leading to the lessening of quality or of reliability as later editions appear, when compared to former ones. The most admirable (of many good) qualities of the Webster's New World Dictionary is the sane approach to matters of word usage; while this dictionary is "prescriptive" in indicating what pronunciations and definitions are normative, it does give alternate ones that are common but less "proper", so far as American usage is concerned. It includes an healthy amount of words in informal English and slang; unlike the too prim-and-proper Funk and Wagnall dictionaries or the American Heritage Dictionary, both quite fine but rather too staid, the Webster's New World Dictionary does not purge such words and locutions of less-then-high-pedigree from the lexicon, but, rather, admits them while it very helpfully indicates their level of English usage admissibility or unacceptability for inclusion in formal writing or speaking. Each subsequent edition of the Webster's New World Dictionary, too, has undergone a thorough updating to add new words, technical or otherwise, to the vocabulary of the language.

A single, general-purpose college or desk-reference dictionary, even so admirably aimed at sophisticated adult level as the Webster's New World College Dictionary is, will not suffice to fulfil all requirements. For one thing, a truly unabridged dictionary, usually multi-volume, is good to have around for exceptional needs; I have several such dictionaries, of which, among them, I particularly commend "The Random House Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged", Second Edition, in one humongous and heavily oversized volume (of xlii, 2478, 32 p.). Also, one or a few dictionaries which correspond(s) to Commonwealth usage is (or are) important for non-American readers to possess and to use. Being here in Canada, I tend most to rely upon British dictionaries for spelling (especially Cassell's, Chamber's, and Harrap's fine recent editions of their respective dictionaries) and on specifically Canadian dictionaries (most notably the impeccable Gage dictionaries) for pronunciation or for peculiarly Canadian use and origin, but for definitions, I always have preferred the best American dictionaries, especially the various editions of Webster's New World Dictionary.

The Amazon buyer cannot go wrong in purchasing any variant of the Webster's New World Dictionary. If he cannot afford or find the latest edition, any of the previous "college" editions is quite suitable and reliable for everyday use. Go for it!


Webster's New World College Dictionary
Webster's New World College Dictionary
by Michael E. Agnes
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £14.61

5.0 out of 5 stars 4th Edition, like 3rd Ed. before it & the 5th Ed. Subsequently, of the Webster New World College Dictionary, Tops U.S. Lexikons!, 8 Oct 2014
I long have used the Webster's New World Dictionary of American English, the most recommendable and comprehensive of its variants being any designated for "college" (in U.S.A. lingo including "university") use. The edition which most people usually think of as the first edition of this dictionary was the only English dictionary which students at the college where I did my freshman and sophomore years of study, in the mid-1960s, were permitted to cite as their lexical authority (the then recently debased "Collegiate" dictionary from Merriam-Webster, having been prime among the dictionaries that students were forbidden to use in writing their papers and assignments). There had been forerunners of the supremely fine Webster's New World Dictionary under the same title, published decades before the 1950s, under the imprint of World Publishers, but those earlier ones did not so deserve to be considered the first edition (which seems to have gone through printings from 1954 or so to 1968, of which the one that I first obtained was the 1964 printing). I have acquired and used every edition of this dictionary, right up to and including the fourth and now the fifth editions. I have retained each much-loved, well-used edition, keeping them in various rooms of my house, along with some other favoured dictionaries, for ready resort near desks, tables, or chairs where I most often read or write.

An interesting feature, by the way, of the Second College Edition, at least of the sturdy "Special School Printing" of it which I own, is a flexi-disc (33.3 r.p.m., 7 in.) included with it that bears the title upon it, "New World Phonoguide: an Audio Supplement to the Pronunciation Guide and Phonetic Symbols" which could be of considerable help to users for whom English is a second (third, etc.) language. I have not seen this helpful disc in other editions of this dictionary as I own copies of them. As for the fourth college edition, one or some printing(s) of it come(s) with an accompanying CD-ROM.

Each edition of the Webster's New World Dictionary has improved on the one that preceded it. Alas, some dictionaries, e.g., those benighted "Collegiate" dictionaries from Merriam-Webster, which fell from grace when they began to be based on the excessively permissive Webster's Third New International Dictionary, Merriam-Webster's unabridged dictionary which had displaced the rock-solid and far more trustworthy Webster's New Twentieth Century Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged 2nd Edition, on which earlier and better Merriam-Webster's "Collegiate" dictionary editions formerly and more happily had been based. Similar decline also has beset numerous other dictionaries which have not undergone wise or sufficient revision, leading to the lessening of quality or of reliability as later editions appear, when compared to former ones. The most admirable (of many good) qualities of the Webster's New World Dictionary is the sane approach to matters of word usage; while this dictionary is "prescriptive" in indicating what pronunciations and definitions are normative, it does give alternate ones that are common but less "proper", so far as American usage is concerned. It includes an healthy amount of words in informal English and slang; unlike the too prim-and-proper Funk and Wagnall dictionaries or the American Heritage Dictionary, both quite fine but rather too staid, the Webster's New World Dictionary does not purge such words and locutions of less-then-high-pedigree from the lexicon, but, rather, admits them while it very helpfully indicates their level of English usage admissibility or unacceptability for inclusion in formal writing or speaking. Each subsequent edition of the Webster's New World Dictionary, too, has undergone a thorough updating to add new words, technical or otherwise, to the vocabulary of the language.

A single, general-purpose college or desk-reference dictionary, even so admirably aimed at sophisticated adult level as the Webster's New World College Dictionary is, will not suffice to fulfil all requirements. For one thing, a truly unabridged dictionary, usually multi-volume, is good to have around for exceptional needs; I have several such dictionaries, of which, among them, I particularly commend "The Random House Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged", Second Edition, in one humongous and heavily oversized volume (of xlii, 2478, 32 p.). Also, one or a few dictionaries which correspond(s) to Commonwealth usage is (or are) important for non-American readers to possess and to use. Being here in Canada, I tend most to rely upon British dictionaries for spelling (especially Cassell's, Chamber's, and Harrap's fine recent editions of their respective dictionaries) and on specifically Canadian dictionaries (most notably the impeccable Gage dictionaries) for pronunciation or for peculiarly Canadian use and origin, but for definitions, I always have preferred the best American dictionaries, especially the various editions of Webster's New World Dictionary.

The Amazon buyer cannot go wrong in purchasing any variant of the Webster's New World Dictionary. If he cannot afford or find the latest edition, any of the previous "college" editions is quite suitable and reliable for everyday use. Go for it!


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