Profile for reader-in-the-Fens > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by reader-in-the-Fens
Top Reviewer Ranking: 235,958
Helpful Votes: 125

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
reader-in-the-Fens (Cambs UK)

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Desigual Lanoria Empire Line Women's Dress
Desigual Lanoria Empire Line Women's Dress
Price: 60.00 - 89.00

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gorgeous dress, 23 Nov 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I'm 5'9" and the dress falls about 2 inches above the knee on me. I'm normally a size 8-10, but sized up to a 12, having read other reviews about this brand. It fits perfectly. A very flattering and quite low neckline, it 's a dress that clings to curves and is very pretty and feminine. Made in a good quality jersey fabric, it is pricey, but I was impressed by how well made it is. I bought it in the red, which is a nice rich shade and utterly gorgeous. Would recommend.


Natural Vitamin E Oil 250ml Size
Natural Vitamin E Oil 250ml Size
Offered by The Aromatherapy Shop Ltd
Price: 16.95

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars good stuff, 12 Jun 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I use it to enrich other oils, such as apricot kernel and macadamia oil. My skin can sometimes get slightly dry and feel tight, and this is an excellent oil to combat that. It's easily absorbed and a little goes a long way. With regular use, I find that skin appears plumper and feels silky with a smooth texture. I also use it with a dermaroller so it can sink right down into the deeper layers of the skin. This one really does work. Highly recommended whatever your age or skin type.


Francis Bacon: Anatomy of an Enigma (Phoenix Giants)
Francis Bacon: Anatomy of an Enigma (Phoenix Giants)
by Michael Peppiatt
Edition: Paperback

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The great Francis Bacon, 16 July 2006
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A fascinating study of the great man and his work. Peppiatt knew Bacon from the 60's onwards, thus the biography feels intimate and true to life and is successful in depicting the flamboyance, complexity and sheer charisma of this important British artist.

Bacon's father is depicted as a key figure, as well as a leitmotif of brutal masculinity in Bacon's paintings. A tyrannical, martial man, (according to Peppiatt, he has his teenage son horsewhipped by his grooms in order to `make him more of a man') he is the very antithesis of the highly intelligent, young, unconventional Bacon. This early encounter with such brutality goes some way to explaining the power and masculine energy so apparent in Bacon's paintings, as well as the sado-masochistic and destructive nature of his sexual relationships.

Peppiatt describes Bacon's influences - Picasso's biomorhic figures as well as his 'Crucifixion', the photographic images of Edweard Muybridge, Velasquez's 'Pope Innocent X', which inspired the 'Screaming Pope' series.

Bacon's days spent as `bon viveur', drinking vast quantities of alcohol at the Colony in Soho, with the cliquey, languorous dry wit of camp proprietress, Muriel Belcher is captured wonderfully ("Champagne for my real friends, real pain for my sham friends!", as Bacon once declared), as well as his slightly alarming brush with the Kray twins (who fascinated him), and his doomed relationship with his tragic muse, George Dyer.

All in all this is an immensely enjoyable read as well as providing a real insight into the artist and his work.


A Fatal Inversion
A Fatal Inversion
by Barbara Vine
Edition: Paperback

20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ten Years After..., 1 July 2006
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: A Fatal Inversion (Paperback)
A Fatal Inversion is among Barbara Vine's most creepy and atmospheric novels. From the start of the first chapter, death casts its ominous shadow over the entire novel, when Adam, Rufus and Shiva, now three grown men in their thirties are forced to confront something terrible and tragic that took place ten years previously, when they lived together in a commune at Wyvis Hall in Suffolk in the sweltering summer of 1976.

The group of young people who come to inhabit `Ecalpemos', a Georgian mansion, inherited from his Great Uncle by 19-year-old Adam Verne-Smith, are by no means likeable characters - hedonistic, selfish, arrogant, manipulative, weak - yet you become intensely caught up in their world and the landscape of their individual psychologies. Then the wheel of fate is set in motion with the arrival of the seemingly mysterious, disturbed and child-like Zosie. Barbara Vine writes about dysfunctional individuals in a unique way that imbues the mundane with chilling significance.

As ever, with Barbara Vine, buildings and landscape take on a dark and sinister aspect, even as the hot summer sun of '76 beats down, and Vine's Suffolk countryside is at times as menacing and uncanny as that of M.R. James. More than just a crime and mystery novel, this book makes you think about human conscience, lack of it, deception, innocence, guilt, and the hard truth that in life, the amoral do not always get their just deserts.


The Slaves of Solitude
The Slaves of Solitude
by Patrick Hamilton
Edition: Paperback
Price: 5.69

78 of 79 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb wartime classic, 14 April 2006
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Slaves of Solitude (Paperback)
Bombed out of her London flat, Miss Roach, thirty-nine and alone, takes up residence at the Rosamund Tea Rooms at Thames Lockdon. Here we encounter an array of lost, rootless, lonely people, the flotsam and jetsam of the War - the slaves of solitude.

The story unfolds through the eyes of the shy, self-effacing Miss Roach, a woman whose natural decency stands in stark contrast to the casual cruelty of the people around her; her fragile sense of self-worth, constantly undermined by her back-stabbing friend, the odious Vicki Kugelmann, the drunken ineptitude of her American lover, Lieutenant Pike, but most of all, her humiliation at the hands of one of Hamilton's most grotesque fictional monsters, the repellent Mr Thwaites - bully, narcissist, and Fascist sympathiser.

Despite the apparent tragedy of Miss Roach's situation, the pathos is relieved by Hamilton's unique black humour and his ability to write perfect, utterly convincing dialogue, infused with waspish comedy. Ever-present is the War itself, robbing the characters of their little comforts, dictating their everyday lives. An underrated, enjoyable, entertaining read. Great to see this wartime classic back in print again!


Requiem for an Angel: The Roth Trilogy
Requiem for an Angel: The Roth Trilogy
by Andrew Taylor
Edition: Paperback

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 11 April 2006
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I can recommend "Requiem for an Angel" as a series of gripping psychological crime novels, (all with an ecclesiastical theme), for its intricately crafted plots and ultimately, for its merit as an intelligent study on the nature of evil. In each book, the events are seen through the eyes of a different character, all of whom are connected by the warp and weft of the plot, over a period of 40 years.

This collection of three novels begins with "The Four Last Things", set in the present day. Lucy Appleyard, the daughter of Sally, a vicar working in a run-down parish, is abducted. Taylor challenges the reader with his sensitive yet disturbing portrayal of the social misfit and paedophile, Eddy - no mean feat - and his odd relationship with the woman known as "Angel". The novel keeps you gripped until the very last paragraph, where a shocking truth is revealed.

The next novel in the series, "The Judgment of Strangers" takes place in the promiscuous 1970s and concerns the Reverend David Byfield, vicar of Roth, a lonely widower whose decision to marry the frigid Vanessa unleashes a series of catastrophic events that lead to murder.

The final story, "The Office of the Dead" is told by Wendy Appleyard, recently separated from her unfaithful husband, who is taken in by her friend, Janet in the cathedral town of Rossington, near Cambridge. Coping as a woman on the brink of divorce in the late 1950s, Wendy's character is warm and all too human, as she becomes embroiled in this enclosed, masculine ecclesiastical world. Through her eyes, we witness a series of increasingly bizarre and troubling events as they unfold.

Then, there's the mysterious figure of Francis Youlgreave, Edwardian clergyman, poet and recluse, who though long dead, seems to direct and influence the main characters thoughout the entire trilogy.

An absolute gem of a book, beautifully written, intricate, chilling, profound and thoroughly entertaining.


Page: 1