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andypriestner@mail.com (Abingdon, UK)

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Doctor Who: The Wages of Sin
Doctor Who: The Wages of Sin
by David A. McIntee
Edition: Paperback

2.0 out of 5 stars Atmospheric but aimless, 12 Dec 2000
The Wages of Sin is an aimless narrative of loose ends. McIntee could have tried something daring here but instead decides to primarily concentrate on toning down Rasputin's excesses to very little purpose or effect. Infact McIntee would have us believe that the mad monk is just misunderstood and that he actually shares much in common with the Doctor. Hmmm - I think not. The Doctor, Jo and Liz are entirely incidental to the plot and are poorly served here. The best thing about the book is the well realised cold funereal atmosphere as Russia waits for revolution. All in all a moderate read that is neither exciting or involving.


Doctor Who: Storm Harvest
Doctor Who: Storm Harvest
by Robert Perry
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good holiday read..., 24 Sep 1999
I chose to buy Storm Harvest because I was about to go on holiday and the back cover blurb sounded perfect. Holiday planet, blue seas, white sands etc. And the planet of Coralee did initially prove to be a wonderful evocation of my own beach life on an island in the Med. However as always there is trouble in paradise. The Alien-esque Krill are starting to hatch out on a reef out at sea and soon the whole planet is threatened by these voracious monsters. This is Doctor Who by numbers - isolated outpost, mysterious protagonist, small band of humans, deadly monsters - all of which make it a fairly formulaic read. But then on the other hand the book is cleverly constructed. The Krill, like Ridley Scotts' Aliens, have a defined lifecycle (egg, hatch - impossible to destroy - almost) and are potential pawns in the hands of the unscrupulous. The plot has a beginning, a middle and an end and is therefore ultimately satisfying. There are several minor characters that are clearly more interesting than the two-dimensional front-runners - particularly the weak human slaves who languish aboard an orbitting spaceship and the dolphins (yes-dolphins!) who power around on exo-skeletons and regularly comment on the action. There is even an evil dolphin - who is quite superb ! Don't expect Storm Harvest to philosophise, or provide you with a life-changing experience, because you will be disappointed. Just sit back and enjoy an easy read. The best moment which I tried in vain to emulate on my beach was the Doctor's attempt to create a gigantic City of the Exxilons sandcastle complete with flashing beacon !


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