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Nomesky (Liverpool, UK)

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Innovate Like Edison
Innovate Like Edison
by Michael J. Gelb
Edition: Hardcover

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A comprehensive biography and textbook, 3 April 2008
This review is from: Innovate Like Edison (Hardcover)
This book is excellent. It is beautifully written and extensively illustrated with photographs and diagrams of the great man himself and his inventions.

The book begins with a comprehensive and engaging biography and then leads logically into a breakdown of Edison's genius into 5 core competencies, each composed of 5 subcompetencies (25 in total).

Whether you adopt the whole system, or simply some basic principles, this book is certainly inspirational.

I bought Axelrod's "102" lessons book on Edison at the same time as this book. Gelb and Caldicott's book blows Axelrod's very poor volume right out the water. Don't go there....


Edison on Innovation: 102 Lessons in Creativity for Business and Beyond
Edison on Innovation: 102 Lessons in Creativity for Business and Beyond
by Alan Axelrod
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £16.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Lacks any significant insight..., 30 Mar. 2008
A bitter disappointment. This book offers no additional insights into Edison's creativity that cannot be deduced by anyone reading a potted biography of Edison (for free) from the internet.

The book suffers from poor written style ("Lesson 7. Do the thing itself" - yikes - don't tell me there was no better way of phrasing this!) and endless repetition.

The "102" lessons is, in my opinion, an overinflation to pad out the book. Many of these "lessons" have significant overlap and amalgamating these into fewer (I would have guessed about a dozen!) would have made for a more robust and memorable series of observations.

Congratulations also to Mr Axelrod for presenting a potted biography of Edison in the opening chapters that makes the life of one of the most influential inventors of the modern age seem as dull as dishwater!

Two stars for (1) an appendix listing some of the most important patents filed by Edison and (2) for nice cover art presentations. Content = 1 star (at best).

Finally, I also bought "Innovate Like Edison" by Gelb and Caldicott at the same time as Axelrod's book. This is a far superior volume (reviewed elsewhere) which I strongly recommend you consider as an alternative to Axelrod's book.


The New Business Road Test: What Entrepreneurs and Executives Should Do Before Writing a Business Plan (Financial Times Series)
The New Business Road Test: What Entrepreneurs and Executives Should Do Before Writing a Business Plan (Financial Times Series)
by John Mullins
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Indispensible..., 31 Jan. 2008
A fantastic book. Very sensible approach to "road testing" your business idea. My only complaint is that my ideas keep failing his comprehensive road test!

I won't be giving up my day job, just yet, thanks to Mullins....


Thinkertoys: A Handbook of Creative-Thinking Techniques
Thinkertoys: A Handbook of Creative-Thinking Techniques
by Michael Michalko
Edition: Paperback
Price: £15.90

7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazingly inspirational....., 24 Jan. 2008
I feel compelled to put in my 'tuppence' worth about this book but in truth have very little to add to the other reviews. This book is a fantastic resource. It sets out "linear", "intuitive" and other techniques to assist in the generation of fresh ideas for business.

It actually makes the process enjoyable and I have found myself using the techniques in this book to solve business challenges, in unrelated fields, just to keep my mind fresh.

The techniques taught can also help in solving day-to-day dilemmas by helping come up with creative solutions.

A truly remarkable, and amazingly inspirational, book.


Developing New Business Ideas: A Step-by-Step Guide to Creating New Business Ideas Worth Backing (Financial Times Series)
Developing New Business Ideas: A Step-by-Step Guide to Creating New Business Ideas Worth Backing (Financial Times Series)
by Mary Bragg
Edition: Paperback
Price: £22.49

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A real treasure...., 13 Jan. 2008
This book is a revelation. I was a bit ruffled by the price but it is worth every penny.

The 'Bragg' process for idea generation is detailed in a stepwise, logical and comprehensive manner. The book is well laid out and the methods described are so intuitive, once you have been shown, that ideas seem to present themselves often without even 'trying'. The main problem has been keeping up with ideas fast enough to allow a thorough investigation into their feasibility before moving on to the next idea which presents itself. The excellent anecdotes on real-life business successes (e.g Dyson, 'Nike') are really inspirational.

I am almost reluctant to recommend this book for fear of being pipped to a lucrative business idea! A real treasure....


Eating for England: The Delights and Eccentricities of the British at Table
Eating for England: The Delights and Eccentricities of the British at Table
by Nigel Slater
Edition: Hardcover

37 of 43 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Missed opportunity, 6 Nov. 2007
I must begin by confessing I am huge Slater fan and (sad case that I am) own all his publications to date, except 'Thirst'. However, I fully agree with many of the reviewer's comments on 'Eating For England'.

This latest volume is a missed opportunity. The subject matter promised a solid insight into British eating habits, delivered with Slater's trademark wit and acute observation. However what we get is over a hundred short paragraphs, apparently completely randomly assembled, with the odd witticism or two on a number of rather banal topics. This book lacks structure or a coherent 'narrative' which actually makes it very difficult to engage with (even Slater's cookbooks have themed chapters eg 'Appetite', 'Real Food').

I must also confess to becoming bored of Slater's written style, which is no longer fresh and lively but now seems predictable and repetitive. I opened this book with high expectations, unfortunately it failed to deliver.


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