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Reviews Written by
Alexander J. Dunn "alexjdunn" (UK)
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We Can't Dance
We Can't Dance
Offered by I-Deal Media
Price: £7.27

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Signs of a fresh new sound, 11 Feb. 2012
This review is from: We Can't Dance (Audio CD)
Although there are still a few banal songs here, as there were on the previous album 'Invisible Touch', there are encouraging signs of a fresh new Genesis sound in the form of the fantastic single 'No Son of Mine', the truly engaging epic 'Driving the Last Spike' and the haunting 'Dreaming While You Sleep'.


Invisible Touch
Invisible Touch
Offered by westworld-
Price: £11.74

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Satisfactory but getting a little tired, 11 Feb. 2012
This review is from: Invisible Touch (Audio CD)
While this album is satisfactory and gains a lot of appeal by its concise, straight forward approach, it is the first sign that Genesis were coming to the end of an era, with some of the songs straying from what is best about pop and more towards the banal.


Abacab
Abacab
Price: £8.90

4.0 out of 5 stars Finally some girls!, 11 Feb. 2012
This review is from: Abacab (Audio CD)
'Abacab' continues where 'Duke' left off and carries on further into pop, R+B and punk territory, leaving many old fans, used to Genesis producing mini-symphonies, dismayed, and gaining the band a whole new wave of fans - women!


Duke
Duke
Offered by best_value_entertainment
Price: £19.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The sun has come out, 11 Feb. 2012
This review is from: Duke (Audio CD)
At this point in Genesis' career, the dark clouds disappear from their music and, all of a sudden, the sun is shining and they sound bright, upbeat, concise and accessible.


And Then There Were Three
And Then There Were Three

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A crucial turning point, 11 Feb. 2012
I always used to think this album was the weakest Genesis album due to its departure from prog rock territory but, having done a little reading about punk, which arrived at the time of this release, I now think that, if Genesis hadn't made 'And Then There Were Three...' exactly like they did, there wouldn't haven't been a Genesis in 1984, the peak of their success.


Wind And Wuthering
Wind And Wuthering

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Romantic Swan Song, 11 Feb. 2012
This review is from: Wind And Wuthering (Audio CD)
This album belongs to keyboardist Tony Banks and guitarist Steve Hackett and is the swan song, not just for Hackett, prior to his leaving the band, but for the truly Romantic Genesis of vast panoramic textures and quaint Englishness, which is to be found, in some measure, on all their previous albums.


A Trick Of The Tail
A Trick Of The Tail
Offered by best_value_entertainment
Price: £19.99

0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 'Dance on a Volcano' and other long songs, 11 Feb. 2012
This review is from: A Trick Of The Tail (Audio CD)
Although the opening track 'Dance on a Volcano' is fantastic and proved that Phil Collins was more than a match for Peter Gabriel in his singing ability, this disc suffers, perhaps for the first time in Genesis history, from being just too long for consumption in one sitting.


The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway
The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Surreal but nice., 11 Feb. 2012
Although this album has an attractively surreal atmosphere that makes it stand out in the Genesis catalogue, it falls a little short of substance over the course of its two over-long discs.


Selling England By The Pound
Selling England By The Pound
Offered by best_value_entertainment
Price: £19.99

4.0 out of 5 stars English Whimsy, 11 Feb. 2012
This album seems to be a more refined incarnation of the previous album 'Nursery Cryme', with the same fondness for the quality of Englishness this time mixed with a more care-free approach to the composition and recording process.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 21, 2012 10:21 AM GMT


Nursery Cryme
Nursery Cryme
Offered by westworld-
Price: £19.98

4.0 out of 5 stars 'The Album With 'The Fountain Of Salmacis' On', 11 Feb. 2012
This review is from: Nursery Cryme (Audio CD)
'Nursery Cryme' is, for me, always going to be 'the album with 'The Fountain Of Salmacis' on'. This composition, the last piece on the album, is simply sublime and manages to tell, with the limitations of just five instruments, an epic story from Greek mythology in under eight minutes. The opening thirty seconds is worth buying the album for; using a mellotron keyboard, a guitar and sparing use of bass and drums, the band actually sound like a full orchestra. This is said of much so-called progressive rock but it is rarely true. The highest praise I can think of for any piece of music is that it does not waste a second of its running time. With just a few very minor reservations regarding length of instrumental passages, I can give 'The Fountain Of Salmacis' this level of praise. I just wish I could say the same about the six preceding tracks.

The opening track, 'The Musical Box', is far more famous than 'The Fountain Of Salmacis' but, for all its great musical moments and fascinating lyrical theme, it runs for two and a half minutes longer and fails to provide proportionally greater impact. Therefore, purely in terms of value for time and energy, it cannot take the position of best track on the album. In a recent interview, Peter Gabriel hints that he would have preferred the long instrumental section that precedes the wonderful vocally-led final section to finish earlier because he feared listeners who were interested in the story the lyrics were telling might lose interest. I used to lap up every second of Genesis instrumental work about ten years ago but now I agree with Gabriel that songs are about communication above all else, and Genesis were always, after all, primarily a group of songwriters.

With regard to the other five tracks on 'Nursery Cryme', one falls into the same trap as 'The Musical Box' ('The Return Of The Giant Hogweed') and the other four, all significantly shorter songs, provide much needed contrast to the three long songs. 'For Absent Friends' is a charming if slightly twee number sung by new drummer and singer Phil Collins whereas 'Harlequin' is more twee than charming but still listenable. 'Seven Stones' would have been a lot better if it had been edited down by a minute. When I think of the music in this song, I can never understand how it takes as much as five minutes to include it all. Special mention must go to the snappy and genuinely funny 'Harold The Barrel'. We have in this song an early sign that the band were interested in straight-ahead pop songs at the same time as songs which blended styles. It just so happens that, as is usually the case with less experienced composers, early 70s Genesis were simply not equipped to write songs which had sufficient impact that were in the three minute pop song format. As they matured as writers they were able to realise the goal they had had all along since their first album, 'From Genesis To Revelation' - to write great pop music.

I mentioned in my review of Genesis' previous album, 'Trespass', that I felt the band had three main eras; the eras led by Anthony Phillips, Peter Gabriel and Phil Collins. 'Nursery Cryme' is the first of the four albums in 'my' Gabriel era and I think that it is the best. I say this because I feel sizzling within the music a huge sense of potentiality. The music was mainly written by Tony Banks, Mike Rutherford and Peter Gabriel, three very young men just out of English public school education and thus full of, on the one hand, crushing emotional repression and, on the other, profound desire to express their passion for life. The result of this mix is music that is, on the surface, about polite schoolboy stuff like Greek mythology learned in Classics lessons, yet, just beneath it, is dark and wild. It's a very exciting combination. The odd thing is that the subject matter of 'The Musical Box' is the emotional repression of the Victorian era yet, even then, the resultant song sounds repressed! Anyway, the bottom line is this is one of the three essential Genesis albums out there. Buy 'Nursery Cryme', 'Trespass' and 'We Can't Dance' and you're sorted.


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