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Amazon Customer "Geoff Nelder" (Chester, UK)

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Planet Purgatory
Planet Purgatory
Price: £0.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Page-turning in limbo, 11 July 2015
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This review is from: Planet Purgatory (Kindle Edition)
Who isn’t fascinated by what happens when we die? Okay, quite a lot of people are in denial of the curious streak in them and don’t want to think of fate and their post-mortem if anything. Heaven, Hell, somewhere or something else? This is one of those cases where literature meets philosophy rather than science. Fantasy, yes, not science fiction but absorbing all the same for it is literally ‘out of this world’. Stories set more-or-less with the concept of purgatory can be found from the ancient Greeks, the Bible, Dante’s The Divine Comedy; to David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas, and many contemporary novels use the concept of limbo to an intriguing effect. The first contemporary novel based on Purgatory that struck me as both ironically funny and thoughtful is Pit-Stop by Ben Larken. In that novel people in a roadside café find they cannot leave and conclude they are in a kind of limbo waiting for the Reaper to collect them – unless they can escape. I enjoyed that book so much I now compare it to stories based on that link between life and the after-life.
Planet Purgatory is easily worthy of such comparison. In this case one man suspects that he, his four-legged best friend and the people around are in Purgatory, while they believe they are colonists on an Earth-like planet. However, while in Pit-Stop the reader can believe totally in the story for a long time into the novel, in Planet Purgatory nothing suspends belief as much as a whale flying up out of the ground and landing on top of you. Brilliant. Much of the book is like a road trip written by the Grimm brothers in the setting of the film Avalon. Yet, it isn’t all laughs – I hurt when the dog died. (or did it?) The imp is delightfully clever and intriguing who “...stared at me with an intensity that it was a wonder I didn’t burst into flames.”
So pleased to see a Rubik’s Cube involved in such a tale, however briefly. My brain has forgotten how to unscramble one but my fingers remember. This novel is rather like a Rubik’s Cube where ideas and people are scrambled but patterns form and the final page is the puzzle solved – so to speak.
Nothing is what it seems in Planet Purgatory, a morality tale at its most compelling grotesque. Highly commended.


View From the Sixth Floor:: An Oswald Tale
View From the Sixth Floor:: An Oswald Tale
by Elizabeth N Horton-Newton
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.21

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Where cider meets assassination, 22 Jun. 2015
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One Thursday after school six of us teens met up outside the Gaumont in Cheltenham. With the exuberance of youth we giggled our way in to watch The Village of the Damned, a film adaptation of John Wyndham’s science fiction novel, The Midwich Cuckoos. I was mad keen on science fiction and eager to see the film and to hold the hand of Elaine (surname withheld to protect our blushes.). Sadly, Colin wasn’t so keen on the film and might have imbibed too much under-age cider. He kept tickling the girls either side of him and their histrionics, followed by booing from the audience around us attracted the manager who gave us a warning. A few minutes later the film was stopped and I thought we were definitely going to be ejected but sadly it was worse.
The date was 22nd November 1963
The manager walked in front of the now blank screen, coughed and said, “I am afraid I have shocking news. I’m sorry to say that John F Kennedy, the President of the USA, has been shot and feared dead.” He stood there as if not knowing what to say next. The auditorium hushed, waiting for him to say more.
He spread his arms wide. “There will be more news on the radio over the next hour or so, and television might be interrupted to update us. I don’t know about you, but I want to go home.”
People stood, too shocked to speak. Expect Colin, who giggled. Not understanding.
Over the years we have been subjected to many scenarios about the assassination. No one I knew believed that a lone gunman could have been so skilful, or ‘lucky’ to get those bullets in the right spot, at the right time with such a poor gun and yet it was harder to believe that an organisation, let alone the government, could do it. The whole topic is compelling, so it wasn’t that this was yet another book on whether Oswald did it, but oh good, another chance to ruminate on the tragedy. At the same time, that ‘where was I when...’ feeling returns to tease me.
In the words of Jean Gill when reviewing Mark Fine’s The Zebra Affaire, ‘this is a book to savour’ rather than gallop through. I thought the plot was developing too slow a pace to keep me interested until a revelation occurred that sent shockwaves through my Kindle, up my arm and blew me away. After that the pace changed from a gentle canter to gallop—later to canter again, and I was grateful. View from the Sixth Floor is one of those rare delights that uses pace to grab you by the throat, daring you to breathe, changing your view for ever.
On the 50th anniversary of JFK’s anniversary Olivia has the urge to see the Book Depositary for herself. Her neighbour, Bill, is a loner, tries to dissuade her from her journey but eventually insists on accompanying her. It’s a road trip romance spiced as a thriller. Some of the Americanisms made me laugh. The protagonist, Olivia, is fond of what she calls ‘hard apple cider’. In the UK all cider is hard apple except for scrumpy, which is made in the southwest in vats, often with meat thrown in to sizzle to nothing in the high acidity. I drank so much as a teen that I cannot bear the taste now. We’d drank some before entering the Gaumont...
Elizabeth Horton-Newton is adept at bringing luxuriant settings to the reader especially at the beginning of chapters such as ‘bright reds and golds of autumn looked like fire on the water’ and I loved where it was so hot the ‘rain caused steam to rise from the ground like small ghosts’. All right, the climatologist in me knows you can’t see steam, it’s condensation we view but it would lose its magic if rewritten. I’d ponder on what kind of music it was when the ‘band played covers’, a term not used in the UK and what on Earth are ‘snicker doodles’? Vive le difference!
I like quotes that set a chapter up. Many good ones in this book and my favourite and most appropriate is one by JFK: ‘The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie, deliberate, contrived and dishonest, but the myth, persistent, persuasive, unrealistic.’ And as Olivia says, ‘We weren’t angry with one another, we were angry with the world.’
View from the Sixth Floor is both gentle in performance yet powerful in content, a page-turning thriller I’m glad to have read.


Footsteps Of Galatea
Footsteps Of Galatea
Price: £2.30

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Ancient myth brought to life, 11 Jun. 2015
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This is a delightfully weird book of the paranormal cleverly utilising an ancient mythical premise that is born from Galatea. She was a milky-white statue that came to life, possibly on Cyprus. I looked for her in the Paphos region where she was seen, apparently, and I kind of felt her presence in many coves, caves and crevices. Her presence in this book is more ethereal than a statue although a bloodline may have descended through to Saffron and her daughter, Omikia. How this ancestral inking of life manifests itself in the contemporary scene comes through this novel like jagged veins.
Richard is the criminal here: we see him plotting, scheming yet he is normal compared to the incandescent Omikia. Her character is terrific, grips you by the throat, her intelligence coruscating compared to the rest – as exemplified by the wordplay between her and Richard. Like verbal chess, move and countermove, check and mate. In spite of the mythical undercurrent with the mysterious ‘ink’, there are wonderful thrusty conversations just as you might overhear. I did today, on the #7 bus from Broad Green, Liverpool. A girl, maybe 6, on the back seat gave a running commentary to her dad near the front, on everything she observed. Loved it, especially when she uttered to a boy near her, “My ma is bigger than your da.” Haha, images unfurl as they do in the well-crafted dialogues in Footsteps of Galatea.
Sometimes it is the simplest of descriptions that reveal such craft, as in when Mina walks by something: ‘...the case near their front door caught her eye. And yet, she almost didn’t see it. Turning to look at it directly, it was as if nothing was there.
Convinced she’d been mistaken she turned to go and from the corner of her eye, she saw it again.
“I can see you,” she told it. The dilapidated leather case was upright, giving the impression it would be ashamed to lean in any way.’

You might need patience to get into this novel. Become accustomed to the names and absorb their relationships. It’s not like a thriller with a hook to grab you in the first page, paragraph and yet keep going and it will take you. There’s a free chapter of a prequel at the end. In some ways I guessed Footsteps wasn’t the first book and perhaps the author should say in a preface that it is a sequel. Perhaps reading the prequel segment is a better preparation for its sequel but I don’t know because I didn’t find it until afterwards. Either way, this is a book of intriguing characters and ancient plot I’m thrilled to have read.


What the Hell Were You Thinking?: Good Advice for People Who Make Bad Decisions: Volume 6 (Alternate Reality News Service)
What the Hell Were You Thinking?: Good Advice for People Who Make Bad Decisions: Volume 6 (Alternate Reality News Service)
by Ira Nayman
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.89

5.0 out of 5 stars Hilarious, brain-stirring agony aunting, 10 Jun. 2015
Those of us in the know already know that the news mostly isn’t new and largely fabricated by journalists who cannot work to deadlines if they have to find real information. In other words newspapers and broadcast news is so edited, rushed and desperate for catchy headlines that it might as well be fiction. So, why not get your news as a form of entertainment as a metafiction? [Fiction that deals, often playfully and self-referentially, with the writing of fiction or its conventions. – thefreedictionary.com] Once again we are treated to a perfect example of fictionalised news in the Alternate Reality News Service vicariously penned by Ira Nayman. In this instance we go straight to what every newspaper and magazine reader loves the most—the agony aunt columns. Okay, so some of them aren’t relationships but technical, but those are agony too and thus treated to Nayman’s deliciously whacky sense of wit and humour.
Two main journalists cover readers’ questions. Amritsar is a devilishly, fiendish female reporter who wears leg warmers around her spine because what some readers ask her sends shivers up and down her spine so much. TAG (with or without a #) is Tech Answer Guy who often can’t believe the ineptitude of some readers with the consequence of ludicrously funny exchanges during which the editor has to intervene. Great example of insult-tennis over 8 pages from p128.
Yo, Tomtom,
Every kid says that, but every kid does it.
The Tech Answer Guy

Yo, Tech Answer Guy,
Not me.
Sincerely,
Tommy from Tacoma

Yo, Toms,
Even you.
The Tech Answer Guy

Yo, Tech Answer Guy,
No way.
Sincerely,
Tommy from Tacoma

Yo, Thompson,
Way.
The Tech Answer Guy

...
[EDITRIX-IN-CHIEF BRENDA BRUNDTLAND-GOVANNI: Jesus Begesus, you both suck! Do you have any idea how much slapping I would be doing at this very moment if there wasn’t a minor present?]
...

Often the points raised to TAG are about technology that’s so nearly here they might actually already be on your phone without you being smart enough to know it. Take the Far Kempt app: a brilliant piece about a phone app that makes your calls to a taxi firm. It analyses your journeys and via probability calculations it ‘knows’ what you’ve been up to. Eg Glory Holes are your illicit visits to a sexual partner unknown to your spouse, whereas Gory Holes are where you meet with hit men to arrange removal of said spouse, or maybe the sexual partner becoming too demanding, one way or another...There’s graphs with this piece too—marvellous.
I felt in my pocket with irony at agony advice to a woman on Mars escaping her jilted ex to ‘be wary of nitro-glycerine being snuck into your re-cycled water’. Like millions of others who allowed game-playing cardiologist shove stents into my coronary artery, I carry a nitrolingual pump spray of GTN, which is basically nitro-glycerine. Just don’t mess with me or I’ll throw it at yer—d’yer hear?
Another piece of personal interest to me is one on ‘le droit a l’oubli’ the right for individuals to insist that Google and other web databases remove personal information. TAG explores the logical consequences of the world disappearing up its own backside as forgetting becomes such a personal right taken to extremes. I cringed with recollection of my ARIA Trilogy–ironically about infectious amnesia—because Wikipedia deleted the page about it created by my publisher’s publicist. If you search there for ARIA Trilogy now it is says it doesn’t exist, did you mean Area? The Wikipedia police force said it was removed because it (and by association, me) was insufficiently notable to be worthy of an entry. This in spite of it winning two awards (admittedly minor) and the only novel to be about infectious amnesia. At least they didn’t delete me, yet, and Wikipedia’s rival database, wikia.com does have an entry on ARIA Trilogy

Once again Ira Nayman, as the proprietor of the Alternate Reality News Service has come up with a genius collection of short pieces that will have you in stitches yet wondering if these futuristic alternatives are already here. To help you in the usual manner of not, there is an index at the back. It speaks volumes that you’d have to know what the near-random chapter titles mean in order for it to make sense: a kind of joker in the tail.
Highly commended.


Murder Most Rural (The Rizwan Sabir Mysteries Book 5)
Murder Most Rural (The Rizwan Sabir Mysteries Book 5)
Price: £0.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Midsomer Murders meets the SAS with a touch of Hot Fuzz, 16 May 2015
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Holly (Bang-Bang) Kirpachi is the female half of an MOD troubleshooting duo with husband Riz having to deal with terrorists in the UK. Holly is marvellously described as an Essex Girl from Mars. “Non committal hazel eyes” Brilliant. Pages loaded with dynamic phrasing and humour some of which stay such as the Secretary of State who has eyebrows with a life of their own. I can imagine them semaphoring their own thriller novel right now.
The author writes this contemporary thriller with some authority because he has worked in security. The nearest I’ve come to working with terrorists is as a teacher but fending off flying chairs in a classroom and luckily, most of my pupils wanted to learn and were well behaved. However, I’ve been involved as an editor with novels written from the point of view of a Muslim and one was a terrorist plot to blow up the Olympics—The Last Olympiad—written by my writing buddy on Cyprus, John Goodwin.
Chapters are punchy short making them fly by and I liked the description of the part of Essex our two heroes went to: mud, wheat, sheep.
A fair bit of techie stuff from Holly but only enough to make her role convincing—along with her curry cooking. I knew some of it (not the culinary) eg Yagi aerials because in my capacity as an IT Advisory Teacher years ago, I’d installed them, along with 1 metre dishes on the roofs of most of the high schools in Cheshire. I’d encountered interesting caches of stuff on those roofs, some of which also related to the illicit goings on in MMR. Haha. I could write a book... Holly (Bang-Bang) is far from a typical housewife as you could get, she’s mad, clever but very loyal to Riz: not just his right hand, but arm and leg too.
Their ‘help’ was the all-female Black Eyes army unit one of whom, Calamity, wore a necklace of human ears whose previous owners were London gangland leaders. My ears twitched when I read that.
The plot is a grittier version of Miss Marple or Midsomer Murders eg nice Mrs Bradley dies but was it suicide? There are clues, side tracks and ironic humour. The setting in rural Essex evoked haunted old buildings, overgrown woods and shady goings on, exquisitely crafted.
I commend this book, which although is the fifth in a series can easily satisfy as a standalone thriller.


One Sixth of a Gill: a collection
One Sixth of a Gill: a collection
Price: £1.99

5.0 out of 5 stars The poems are sublime, the tales are like poems, 1 May 2015
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At first glance this is a collection of stories, poems, blog pieces and articles but when you plunge into it a WOW factor kicks in. The poems are sublime, the tales are like poems. The blog pieces are interesting, especially the ground-truthing, as we remote-sensing nerds call it, of the 12th century history. Dog aficionados will find their bowls chock a block. In Going to the Dogs we have a fine lyrical narrative eg ‘the mirror had always been an untrustworthy friend... sniggered behind your back.’
This eclectic collection could be described as a literary e-magazine, one you can pick up and relish twenty minutes at a time, on the bus, a waiting room, when a spouse is nagging... and be oblivious within, allowing the world to spin on by.
Some poems are thoughtful translations while others are originals such as Park Statue, which culminates with ...
And if one night she smooths her hair
and twirls her skirt and dances barefoot
will the locked gates tell the stars?

My favourite is a poem Struck Down in Anger, Ward 39
Sample:
I have
told them my name,
the month, the year, the season;
listened to the words ‘table’ ‘apple’ dog’;
subtracted sevens from a hundred
till they grew bored at sixty-five
...
I know these tests for independent capability and dementia and I, like the woman in this poem, desired to escape the well-meaning, healthy, yet strangling confines of an institution. I was blues and twos ambulanced in the early hours to Lodgemoor (isolation) hospital near Sheffield having been struck down by a mystery virus. I couldn’t swallow and breathing became less than optional when my landlord checked on me. Two days and armfuls of penicillin later, I was fine—except that I was in a single-bed-glass ward, not allowed anything to read, nor visitors because they didn’t know what I had. After a week, the termination of my residency was far into the antiseptic mists of time so I planned my escape. With no shoes and no coat I traipsed across Ringinglow Bog to a road and blagged a ride on the number 51 bus into the city. They might still be looking for me although as that was in 1970 I somehow doubt it.
If only, in that ward, I possessed a copy of One Sixth of a Gill I would have been content to stay.


Desperation
Desperation
Price: £0.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Desperately Seeking Survival, 16 Mar. 2015
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This review is from: Desperation (Kindle Edition)
In Andy Weir’s The Martian, a lonely astronaut has his life saved by potatoes and his ability to use tools. In Janet McNulty’s Desperation, a lonely astronaut encounters a potato, and luckily, a life-prolonging crowbar, but there the story comparisons end. Desperation is a desperately short story, full of angst, humour—the kind you need to face disaster—and has those vital ingredients of every story, a hook, vivid characterisation, setting, a beginning and conflict. It lacks resolution but that’s where the reader comes in. There’s assumptions but you know all great conflict stories create tension then just when you anticipate resolution along comes another cliff-hanger.

Andy Weir’s story is a whole novel and to be commended for its geeky hard SF. Janet’s Desperation is a setup and yet it will stay with you, especially if you possess an imagination in the stars.

As a bonus with this Kindle edition you get a free preview of her Solaris Seethes and a substantial chunk of that novel too.


The Zebra Affaire
The Zebra Affaire
Price: £2.12

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Forbidden romance in apartheid cleverly done, 22 Jan. 2015
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This review is from: The Zebra Affaire (Kindle Edition)
This is more than a daring, multi-racial romance set in a racist South Africa in 1976 on the cusp of abandoning apartheid. The best section by far for me is the beginning where black Malawian, Stanwell, crashes his pickup and is illegally cared back to health by a white family and in particular by Elsa (23). The tension is palpable and a marvellous introduction to the girl as she had only just arrived at the house for a job interview and up to this point had not really clicked with Lydia, the lady of the house. I immediately relished a personal connection when Elsa mentioned her namesake was the lion in the book and film, Born Free. I met Joy Adamson in the library in Cheltenham, UK when she gave a talk to us kids in the early 1960s.
There is much to praise in the writing style of The Zebra Affaire with respect to settings and description. Colours, smells and action are all there along with sounds, eg ‘The thunderstorm roiled across the Highveld plateau like the marauding Zulu impi on the warpath... lightning’s vivid scar.’ Sometimes the descriptions borders on being too purple but the reader is left in no doubt where they are and what is happening.
The characters, too, are vivid as are their backgrounds. Sometimes there is too much backstory although I understand the need to lay out the rationale for their behaviour. I liked the way the narrative matches the character. For example the gutsy captain of industry, DGF, has his scholastic background summed by his school motto: Forti Nihil Difficilius*, which ‘filled him with the piss and vinegar to take on the world’. Talking of one of those attributes I relate to Elsa saying how when she peed in a remote part of the bush it was probable no one had ever peed there before and this gave the moment a special thrill. I do the same at ancient places—not the peeing but just to find a niche, say a far-flung corner of Gozo’s Ggantija and put my toe on it savouring the notion no one had stood there for thousands of years.
I would have edited The Zebra Affaire differently. One issue is Point of View (POV). Too often the POV head hops and sometimes with no section breaks. Having said that I enjoyed the POV swap to the dog early on with: ‘An uncomfortable tension descended over the charming tea party. Leo sensed the shift in the wind, got up, stretched, circled a few times, glanced cautiously at the two women, and then settled back down at the same spot with an empathetic sigh.’
Another issue is the relative lack of concern by these influential white families flagrantly breaking the apartheid laws and behaving all sweet and nice to Elsa and Stanwell. In fact there seemed to be no real conflict tugging at the reader until about halfway through when, thank goodness, evil in the guise of a bigoted Security Branch Agent tackles the niceness head on in his brutal way. The last half of the novel becomes grittier as a result and reflects that bit more what most readers want to find in such settings. I would liken aspects of this book to that Booker winner, Disgrace by JM Coetzee, which, instead, is set in post-apartheid South Africa but is jammed with the racial tensions black on white and vice versa. I wonder if Mark Fine nods homage to that masterpiece by naming a secretary as Ms Coetzee?
The author explains his rationale for using sectioned-off italics as mini-encyclopaedias. I can imagine his editors fighting this solution, as would I. Even if some readers didn’t know the details of what Marmite is, or the history of South Africa was, I don’t think a novel is the right place to inform, especially as when the italics end the narrative often remains in the info-dumping. If the author feels there is a need he could have had appendices. The editing guru, famous for his ‘Hunting down the pleonasms’, says there’s never a need for Tell no matter what the genre. However, a little information can help but here I fear it is far too much.
In spite of the info-dump overload, I can recommend this novel. It is Romeo & Juliet meets To Kill A Mocking Bird; it has many touching moments; and embracing a difficult period with aplomb. The title is particularly apt and I found several nuances in the plot that relate to it superbly.

*For the brave, nothing is too difficult. Jeppe High School for Boys, Johannesburg


The Vast and Gruesome Clutch of Our Law
The Vast and Gruesome Clutch of Our Law
Price: £1.99

5.0 out of 5 stars A dystopian original, 25 Nov. 2014
Here we have a tale that is Utopian-inclined yet with nail-biting realism. A near-future Earth coming to grips with an astronomical disaster has solutions maybe as bad as the problems. But this is more a story about people, their potential and consequences. It explores attitudes and reactions to events we can all relate to especially in the light of global political and geo-environmental issues we all face.
Ben Bamber is a writer to watch. He has vision and an urge to write well in such a way we feel compelled to read. I look forward to the sequel.
I have an interest here in that I have met Ben Bamber's original style and was able to persuade my co-editor to include a story of Ben's in our Escape Velocity: The Anthology. This involvement in no way takes away my admiration of this author nor my compulsion to extol this novel.


The Piercing (The Piper Trilogy Book 2)
The Piercing (The Piper Trilogy Book 2)
Price: £3.61

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gripping sequel to The Piper, 19 Oct. 2014
Ever since I was hoisted on my dad’s shoulders in 1949 to watch a Pied Piper procession in the German city of Hamelin and watched mouth open, the thousands of local children dressed in medieval garb following the flautist, I’ve been hooked on the legend. Hence Helen McCabe’s first in this trilogy meant something personal and I’ve hungered for its sequel, The Piercing.
So pleased was I to find the young, lame and mute Pip from book 1 has matured and found his voice here. Yet his past haunts him as his post-doc research is spuriously manipulated and people he interviews are ominously killed before too much information is revealed. Even so, Pip is persuaded to stay and find the missing jigsaw pieces in this intriguing puzzle. Whoever thought the paedophile Pied Piper was a simple legend, done and dusted is in for rude shock.
McCabe is a master of descriptive phrases. We always know where we are and how to feel about the setting. Usually that means dark and spooky, crafted with literary flair as in “a timid wind crept across the well-cut lawn and started to rattle the shutters, snivelling to be let in.” Marvellous. I’ve not been to Transylvania but now I can picture it where “A red-streaked dawn threaded itself through the night clouds, then flamed into life, illuminating the Carpathian mountains and turning their snowy heads into blood.” This is a murder mystery as well as an enquiry into the rapes and heinous practices of the evil Grandsire as he appears to reincarnates himself every 36 years since 1376.
As in real life much of the book is in dialogue between characters so real you could touch them. To my dismay I often witness real people live their lives keeping secrets only to be found out and then making excuses, digging their lying holes deeper. McCabe is brilliant at such dialogue as she was in Piper, and I love the obliqueness of it such as when Pip’s fibs are nearly uncovered such as when Ghita’s father introduces Pip as a history student when Ghita – unbeknown to her father – had met Pip and knew he was a psychologist and yet she played along with the lie. As another character says, “Secrets bring terror.”
I love the way McCabe paints the weather with human attributes. Surely we’ve all heard the wind’s wild laughter and beware the snow, dear readers, and bolt those window shutters when the flakes fall to stop its demons entering.
Aficionados of medieval and gothic legends will find The Piercing a gripping yarn worthy to sequel Piper.


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