Profile for I. Sharpe > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by I. Sharpe
Top Reviewer Ranking: 285,146
Helpful Votes: 25

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
I. Sharpe "Ian Sharpe" (Berkshire, UK)
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Ill Fares The Land: A Treatise On Our Present Discontents
Ill Fares The Land: A Treatise On Our Present Discontents
Price: £4.68

5.0 out of 5 stars A must read for anyone on the Left., 12 Jan. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Brilliant exposition on the 'locust years' of 1990-2010, the two decades 'lost' to neoliberalism and what the Left now needs to do to build a narrative for the future.


Red or Dead
Red or Dead
Price: £4.79

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best book about football that I have ever read..., 1 Sept. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Red or Dead (Kindle Edition)
About the greatest man ever involved in football. Brilliant, absorbing and moving. A book about football, socialism and life. David Peace' s repetitive style works brilliantly, echoing the endless cycle of matches and seasons, but if you are a true fan of the game, you will love this detail; the weather descriptions and references to the line-ups and attendance details. But, Bill is always there, it's always from how he sees it and the reader is soon living every game, kicking every ball, re-living every memory with Bill too. The genius, warmth and humanity of the man comes across beautifully. A triumph of a book that I know will stay with me a long time.


Leviathan (Text-only)
Leviathan (Text-only)
Price: £3.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful., 9 Aug. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The best book about whales and indeed the best book about animals that I have ever read. A must-read for anyone interested in these incredible creatures


The Silence of Animals: On Progress and Other Modern Myths
The Silence of Animals: On Progress and Other Modern Myths
Price: £4.68

21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The rewards of a sceptical and pessimistic outlook., 10 Mar. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I'm a big fan of John Gray' s writing because he is not afraid to take on the big, 'macro' questions about humanity and he doesn't mince his words. I'm not sure that I always agree with his ultimately pessimistic outlook, but he does make a very convincing case that the possibility of salvation, in either a religious or a scientific humanist sense, is a fiction. Indeed, the author reserves particular ire for the atheists and humanists who believe that mankind can progress and perfect itself through the application of scientific reason. He explains his philosophy using examples from literature which help make this work an extremely erudite and rewarding read. I've lost count of the books and authors I've added to my 'wish list' as a result of discovering many of them here. Despite the scepticism and pessimism of his message there is also a degree of consolation on offer too. A book that both challenges and soothes.


How Late It Was How Late (Vintage Booker)
How Late It Was How Late (Vintage Booker)
Price: £3.59

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rivetting, 20 Jan. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Story is told as a stream of consciousness, narrated by Sammy, a Glaswegian small-town crook who wakes up one morning blind after a particularly heavy drinking session and beating from the 'polis' or 'sodjers', as Sammy refers to them. The style of writing is beautifully fluent, you're reading Sammy' s thoughts at the same pace that he's thinking them, which made reading this novel gripping. You learn about aspects of Sammy' s life and a great deal about his personality traits as the narrative progresses. In many ways, Sammy is an unattractive character, but there's an honesty about him that creates empathy in the reader and makes you wish that things turn out well for him. He takes the on-set of his blindness in generally good humour and the way that his thoughts flow and meander have a real feeling of authenticity about them. Brutal and grim but also hilarious and heart-warming. I enjoyed this book immensely.


Sightlines
Sightlines
Price: £5.39

5.0 out of 5 stars The poetry of wild places., 6 Jan. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Sightlines (Kindle Edition)
A wonderful exposition of the wild, northern places; of Orkney and Shetland, St Kilda and Rona. If you yearn for the sea, you'll love this book. There are sea-birds and seals, whales and archaeology in abundance. The book is an exploration for the timeless connection of people, landscape and sea and the creatures that share these spaces with us. Some of the facts about whaling are numbing. 99% of the populations of some species where destroyed, primarily in the C19 and early C20, as the demand for whale oil among the industrialized nations rose to insatiable levels. Baleen whales came to be known as 'right whales', as they were the 'right' whales to hunt. Still, Kathleen Jamie's book made me grateful for what we have left of these animals and these wild places. Her book reinforced to myself my main resolutions for 2013 - to go and see as many gannets and seals as I can.


Mortality
Mortality
Price: £3.59

5.0 out of 5 stars Honest and funny., 28 Dec. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Mortality (Kindle Edition)
Probably required reading for all immortals... Witty and fluent. Some particularly insightful musings on the famous words of Nietzsche, Voltaire and Bob Dylan and it was especially pleasing to see a few quotes from 'Whithnail and I.' Chin chin old boy.


Bring Up the Bodies (Thomas Cromwell Trilogy Book 2)
Bring Up the Bodies (Thomas Cromwell Trilogy Book 2)
Price: £4.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Gripping read, incredible characterization., 9 Dec. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The politics of England in the 1530s vividly brought to life. Can't wait for the final book in the Trilogy.


Double Image (A Format) (Older Fiction Paperbacks)
Double Image (A Format) (Older Fiction Paperbacks)
by Pat Moon
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderfully evocative book, 25 May 2010
When I was a Primary school teacher I read this book with each of my Year 6 classes every year for 7 years and every time I looked forward to reading it even more. The kids loved it, always wanting to read on just a little bit further to the next chapter and the unfolding of the story which is of a mystery/thriller genre. The book's settings and imagery are wonderfully evocative of Dorset Summer holidays and of the sights, smells and feelings of childhood. However, equally, many of the themes in the book are teenage or adult - understanding of one's identity, mental illness, loss, grief and coming to terms with death. Without wanting to give anything away the ending is uplifting. I've just ordered a copy for my son who is coming to the end of Year 6, I hope he loves this book too.


Page: 1