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Words'Worth: a fiction writer's guide to serious editing
Words'Worth: a fiction writer's guide to serious editing
by Ms Jane Riddell
Edition: Paperback
Price: £4.95

5.0 out of 5 stars A great writer's tool., 20 May 2016
This is a great wee book for anyone needing to self-edit (and that's everyone who writes!) Informative, clear and well set out.


Henry of Navarre and the Huguenots in France
Henry of Navarre and the Huguenots in France
Price: £0.90

3.0 out of 5 stars Great starter for ten., 22 Jan. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is an interesting little book which I read as part of my research for my next novel. Reading non-fiction on Kindle is always a bit of a challenge - I much prefer the ability to highlight a hard copy. The most fascinating sections of the book are the alleged quotations from letters and speeches made by both henry and others around him. I say 'alleged' because I haven't yet had time to check their likely veracity. Some however are clearly authentic, as the site of where the original can be seen is given - I hope the rest are too, because the insights they give into Henry's character are really helpful. I did however find some of the author's commentary to be overly dogmatic, and some of the statements made tend towards the sweeping. A useful book nonetheless.


Spilled Milk: Based On A True Story
Spilled Milk: Based On A True Story
Price: £3.78

5.0 out of 5 stars Reccommend, 21 Jan. 2016
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Wonderful story


Long Blue Line: Based on a True Story
Long Blue Line: Based on a True Story
Price: £5.60

5.0 out of 5 stars Well Written Book, 21 Jan. 2016
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This was a well written book and I look forward to reading more.


Oxford Children's Classics: Anne of Green Gables
Oxford Children's Classics: Anne of Green Gables
by L.M. Montgomery
Edition: Paperback
Price: £4.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Books to love at age 9/10 and still to love at age ..., 7 Jan. 2016
These all time classics can be read and re-read (I've done so lots of times and I still laugh at certain points and feel myself choking up at others, even though I know what is coming and can quote parts word for word). Books to love at age 9/10 and still to love at age 90/100.


The Promise
The Promise
Price: £4.74

5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderfully atmospheric., 4 July 2015
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This review is from: The Promise (Kindle Edition)
If it's atmosphere you're wanting, this book has it in bucket loads. I was there feeling the heat, experiencing the emotions and rooting for these characters - all of them. Each of the main folk moved me in different ways, and I couldn't put the book down as the tension built. Forget sleep, I had to know how it ended, it moves me still.


The Lay of the Lost Minstrel
The Lay of the Lost Minstrel
Price: £1.32

5.0 out of 5 stars Atmospheric., 5 Mar. 2015
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If you enjoy atmospheric historical shorts then this is for you. Beautifully written and packed full of atmosphere and an excellent introduction to Fire and Sword, providing an interesting and convincing back story for one of the main characters there.


This Little Piggy
This Little Piggy
Price: £3.47

4.0 out of 5 stars A good read., 22 Jan. 2015
This review is from: This Little Piggy (Kindle Edition)
This Little Piggy is classified as crime, but perhaps could more properly be described as ‘suspense’. A baby dies by falling from a balcony in a sink estate and a young child appears to know something about what happened, though the police don’t consider her a reliable witness. Claire, a reporter on a local newspaper, is covering the story, while wrestling with problems of her own that make her particularly vulnerable to the death of a baby and to the plight of the child who is suffering severe neglect. The story is played out against the backdrop of the 1984 miner’s strike, and Davenport skillfully weaves issues arising from that conflict into the plot.

There are all sorts of emotional tugs in the story - should Claire report the child’s situation to the relevant authorities, despite the child’s obvious terror of social services; the inherent pitfalls if she herself becomes involved in the child’s welfare; and the risk that her engagement with the child and with a miner’s representative is clouding her judgement and challenging her appropriate detachment?

The central mystery is who is responsible for the death of the child, and I was very near the end of the book before I worked that out, and I certainly did not anticipate the climax.

Initially I was sympathetic towards the child, and the depiction of her circumstances was well done. But I found my sympathy waning as the story progressed, though, as someone who has been involved in fostering, I understood how and why she acts as she does. And although Claire is the main character, there are some of her actions that I found hard to understand, though most were clarified, at least to some extent, by the end. However it is Joe, another reporter, that I find most likeable, and he is (for me) the person whose story I’d like to follow past the final pages of this book.

There are elements of tragedy and comedy and an ending, which is, on the whole, satisfying, though we are left with the possibility of more to come. If contemporary suspense is your thing, you will enjoy this book.

The relevance of the title becomes clear near the end, but I found it somewhat of a distraction as I read, spending more time than I think the author would have wished in trying to work it out. (This may, however, be a feature that regular readers of the genre will recognize and expect.)


I am David (World Mammoth)
I am David (World Mammoth)
by Anne Holm
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.24

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Intensely moving., 22 Jan. 2015
THis is an intensely moving and extremely well written book. I read it first as a child and it still has the power to move me today. It is that rare thing, a book that lives on in the memory long after you turn the last page.


[(This Little Piggy)] [ By (author) Bea Davenport ] [April, 2015]
[(This Little Piggy)] [ By (author) Bea Davenport ] [April, 2015]
by Bea Davenport
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Suspense to the end., 20 Jan. 2015
This Little Piggy is classified as crime, but perhaps could more properly be described as ‘suspense’. A baby dies by falling from a balcony in a sink estate and a young child appears to know something about what happened, though the police don’t consider her a reliable witness. Claire, a reporter on a local newspaper, is covering the story, while wrestling with problems of her own that make her particularly vulnerable to the death of a baby and to the plight of the child who is suffering severe neglect. The story is played out against the backdrop of the 1984 miner’s strike, and Davenport skillfully weaves issues arising from that conflict into the plot.

There are all sorts of emotional tugs in the story - whether Claire should report the child’s situation to the relevant authorities, despite the child’s obvious terror of social services; the inherent pitfalls if she herself becomes involved in the child’s welfare; and the risk that her engagement with the child and with a miner’s representative is clouding her judgement and challenging her appropriate detachment.

The central mystery of who is responsible for the death of the child is cleverly sustained and I was very near the end of the book before I worked it out - I certainly did not anticipate the climax.

Initially I was sympathetic towards the child protagonist, and the depiction of her circumstances was well done. But I found my sympathy waning as the story progressed, though, as someone who has been involved in fostering, I understood how and why she acts as she does. And although Claire is the main character, there are some of her actions/ feelings that I was unsure of, though most were clarified, at least to some extent, by the end. However it is Joe, another reporter, that I find most likeable, and he is (for me) the person whose story I’d like to follow past the final pages of this book.

There are elements of tragedy and comedy and an ending, which is, on the whole, satisfying, though we are left with the possibility of more to come. If contemporary suspense is your thing, you will enjoy this book.

The relevance of the title becomes clear near the end, but I found it somewhat of a distraction as I read, spending more time than I think the author would have wished in trying to work it out. (This may, however, be a feature that regular readers of the genre will recognize and expe


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