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Graham Herriott
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Reflections of Grace
Reflections of Grace
Price: £1.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Miserable Old Git, 31 May 2013
This book concerns a miserable old git who resembles someone of my acquaintance.
The author has great knowledge of such a subject, and offers a real life individual.
The very type I would keep well clear off myself!
Read this book, it's excellent!


The Flowers of the Forest: Scotland and the Great War
The Flowers of the Forest: Scotland and the Great War
by Trevor Royle
Edition: Hardcover

5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Scots troops, 18 Feb. 2011
Excellent book. Gives a great deal of info on the troops involved. Of the men eligible for service 50% of Scots served, a much higher proportion than in England. This alone tells us much about attitudes especially as there was a strong nationalistic movement at the time.
All Scots ought to read this book!


The Annals of Imperial Rome (Classics)
The Annals of Imperial Rome (Classics)
by Tacitus
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Rome, 18 Feb. 2011
This is a good book and most enjoyable. Coupled with Seutonius and Pliny the Younger it gives us an insight into Rome as she really was! Sad that so many chapters are missing although there is nothing that can be done about this.
Two small niggles however. The style of translation is indeed somewhat dated, although it was first published in 1956 of course. The insistence on using modern day army terminology for the Roman army was an irritation I thought. We are better taught by using their own terms I say.

Tacitus is dull in comparison to Seutonius although that is because he attempts to give a year by year comment on Rome. He is less willing to reveal all the 'spicy' tales but does mention them and possibly he does indeed wish to give the impression that Rome in his day is better ruled than in the past.

Well worth a read and no student of Rome can avoid this book.


Lives of the Twelve Caesars (Classics of World Literature)
Lives of the Twelve Caesars (Classics of World Literature)
by Suetonius
Edition: Paperback
Price: £3.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Twelve, 2 Feb. 2011
Suetonius made a good attempt at history with this book. Searching the documents in the Imperial library he knew well. His history would not be considered complete today however as a place to begin it is excellent.
A basic history, each man's arrival on earth surrounded by the omens Suetonius loved so much, tales from their lives often small items ignored by other historians thus giving a better insight into Rome's daily life. This friend of Pliny and Tacitus mixed with the literary higher classes and reflects their views on life throughout his work, bringing us into his life as well as his subjects.
The style of writing in this version is somewhat dated, possibly the translator lived in the middle of the 19th century, however this version is still quite readable. As a place to begin a study I recommend Suetonius, especially at this price!


3 Para
3 Para
by Patrick Bishop
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Recommended by one who was there., 14 Sept. 2009
This review is from: 3 Para (Paperback)
This book was recommended to me by a sergeant who served during this action. Talking to him of the time the endured the heat, the Taliban and the suffering war causes made me interested in this book.
TV and radio reporting is very poor and what is missed out by journalists, often capable in themselves, is completed by the tale told here. It gave me the indication of what today's soldering involves, the 'feel' for the dangers and purpose of the British contingent, and an appreciation for the individual soldiers courage and tenacity.

I was not too enamoured of the syle of writing. The author not being at the scene did hinder his reporting in some ways, however there is sufficient recording of the events and the people to make this book worth a read.


McCrae's Battalion: The Story of the 16th Royal Scots
McCrae's Battalion: The Story of the 16th Royal Scots
by Jack Alexander
Edition: Hardcover

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The common man and uncommon situations, 18 Dec. 2003
As one who has a great interest in the Great War as well as the Heart of Midlothian Football Club I waited earnestly for this books publication. It was worth the wait!
Not only does Jack Alexander give the background to the Hearts mobilisation, but he relates a story of Edinburgh life in 1914.
The social rise of McCrae himself, from poverty to knighthood. The footballers on the verge of a championship, the mass of others, students, artisans, fans etc who put aside their hopes and fears and laid their lives on the line are covered in excellent detail by Alexander.
A wealth of detail, from a decade of research, put together with a readable, and very enjoyable narrative leaves us with a book that is hard to put down!
This however is a book that rings true throughout the UK. It reflects the lives of ordinary men from all walks of life who went of to serve in a cause greater than anything else in their own individual lives.
A Great Book for the Great War reader. A must read!


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