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Granfan (UK)

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The Old-Girl Network
The Old-Girl Network
Price: £1.99

2.0 out of 5 stars was just too annoying. A silly girl, 3 May 2015
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I gave up with this book half way through because the heroine, Polly, was just too annoying. A silly girl, fluffy and stupid and always getting into completely unnecessary scrapes, I just couldn't see how the very sensible and eligible Nick could possibly fancy her. She would probably drive him crazy in the end. I love Catherine Alliott books but this one was just to daft to be enjoyable or believable.


Three Amazing Things About You
Three Amazing Things About You
Price: £3.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars All the main characters were to good to be true, 25 Jan. 2015
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I am rather iffy about this book. Ok, it kept me entertained for a few days while I read it, but it is a lightweight and undemanding read and the story line hovers between being predictable and being far-fetched. All the main characters were to good to be true, apart from one demonic sister thrown into the mix to play lip service to the fact that everyone in the world isn't a saint, and even she turned into a sort of goodie in the end. Having read books by Lucy Diamond, Trisha Ashley and the like, I think Ms Mansell needs to step it up a bit if she is to compete with a lot of the current authors writing similar stuff (but better).


Anybody Out There (walsh sisters)
Anybody Out There (walsh sisters)
by Marian Keyes
Edition: Paperback

3.0 out of 5 stars I liked this book but I found the constant references to ..., 28 Oct. 2014
Could Have Done Without the Emails From Home! I liked this book but I found the constant references to emails from the dipsy folk at home in Ireland totally irrelevant and just plain annoying. I just can't see why these bits of text had to be included or what their purpose was. I'm afraid I just skipped over them and concentrated on the storyline.


This Charming Man
This Charming Man
Price: £5.22

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars I have read a couple of Marian Keyes Books and liked them. However, 28 Oct. 2014
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This review is from: This Charming Man (Kindle Edition)
Very Weird Book! I have read a couple of Marian Keyes Books and liked them. However, I just couldn't get to grips with this one. The odd staccato writing format in the chapters concerning Lola was just plain odd and difficult to read. After starting the book and thinking it was all about Lola and her relationship with the slimy Paddy, the story suddenly changed and the book then launched into the lives of some other women who hadn't figured in the book before this? I had to check back and make sure I was still reading the same book! Then there were all those small chapters charting quite horrible domestic violence and you didn't know who they were talking about. I found the whole thing completely weird and written in a way that just confused rather than weaving a story and building tension.


A Compromising Position
A Compromising Position
Price: £5.99

2.0 out of 5 stars I love Carole Matthews books normally but this one has to ..., 12 Sept. 2014
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I love Carole Matthews books normally but this one has to the most ridiculous and far- fetched plot I have ever come across. The idea that one saucy photo of a girl loaded onto an internet site by her sleazy boyfriend could be beamed around the world and be headlines news in virtually every country in the developed world is stretching believability to breaking point. The whole plot was a mess from start to finish and I ended up just skimming through the pages to try to find a remotely sensible bit worth reading. Very disappointed.


It's Raining Men
It's Raining Men
Price: £4.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Hurried At The End This book was great in one way but let me down in the ..., 9 Aug. 2014
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This review is from: It's Raining Men (Kindle Edition)
Hurried At The End

This book was great in one way but let me down in the end. The story is intriguing, entertaining, a bit far fetched, but who cares about that as it is a bit of escapism, but too many loose threads at the end left me feeling let down. For a start, there is no explanation about what causes the 'odd clouds' over the village of Ren Dullem - much talked about in the book but never explained. The mystery of the village is kind of explained in a loose way but I wanted proper facts about what had happened. I wanted more explanation about Raine and how she saved the drowning men and how she got to the bay in the first place. As I said, too many odd things highlighted, but never resolved which is a bit frustrating. The end, too, is hurried and, to me,
incomplete as we are left wondering if the two girls who went back to the village ever got together with the men they apparently fell for. Why do authors do this - spin a ripping yarn and spend ages on the detail in the body of the book and then rush through the ending in about a page and a half. It is like they had a good idea and can't be bothered to finish the story off properly.


The Lost Child of Philomena Lee: A Mother, Her Son and a Fifty Year Search
The Lost Child of Philomena Lee: A Mother, Her Son and a Fifty Year Search
Price: £4.19

23 of 25 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Somewhat Unbalanced Book, 26 April 2014
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I saw the film 'Philomena' before I read this book, which may have been a mistake, although I am not sure about that. When I got to the end of the book, my over-riding feeling was that Martin Sixsmith was not the right journalist to have been given to job of telling this story. The film attacks the story from the point of view of a mother in Ireland in the fifties, who had her son forcibly removed from her when he was three years old and given away in adoption to America. The film charts her journey to try and find him fifty years later. The book, on the other hand, pays little attention to the mother's story, apart from some detail leading up to the child's adoption, and it is all written from the point of view of the son, who was adopted by an American couple, and it follows his rise to an exalted position in the Reagan government as a legal adviser. I expect that Martin Sixsmith had little interest in a relatively uneducated Irish woman, who was just looking for her son. It comes over loud and clear in the book that his fascination was only with the political aspects of the story - probably understandable as he is, after all, a political journalist and one who was in Washington at the time that the son was rising through the political ranks. The book is 420 pages long and I read on and on, expecting it to be a story in two halves - one of the mother and one of the son. However, 405 pages are devoted to what became of the son and a miserly 15 pages rushes through the mother's quest to find her lost son. Why the book is called 'The Lost Child of Philomena Lee' is beyond me. It should have been called 'A biography of Michael Hess' (Anthony Lee became Michael Hess when he was adopted). I get the feeling that the scriptwriter of the film felt the same as me after reading the book and he tried to redress the balance by making the film very much from the point of view of the mother - a good and just move in my opinion. I gave this book three stars because it is very well written. I didn't give it more stars because the book is biased and unbalanced and is, in my view, a let down in the end. My advice is to read the book and also see the film, because that way you probably get a more complete picture of the truth of the story.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 12, 2015 1:28 PM BST


The Only Way is Up
The Only Way is Up
by Carole Matthews
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but far-fetched plot, 19 April 2014
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This review is from: The Only Way is Up (Paperback)
I like Carole Matthews style of writing, but I do find many of her plots far-fetched and often quite unbelievable. Take this book for instance - are we really supposed to believe that a couple who have had their children at a posh private school, have lived in a beautiful houses with stables and horses, and had plenty of money for expensive holidays are going to end up preferring to live on a sink estate surrounded by tattooed folk, one of whom rejoices in the name of 'Skull'?? We are also called on to believe that Lily, the heroine of the book, goes from designer clothes and eating out at the best restaurants to having a Brazilian shave on the neighbour's kitchen table before going out to some dodgy club and getting so drunk that she is wheeled home in a shopping trolley! It just suspends all belief which affected my enjoyment of the book. I have read other Carole Matthews books with much better plots than this one although she does tend to turn out the odd duck in my view.


Tempting Fate
Tempting Fate
Price: £3.79

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Marvellous Read, 23 Sept. 2013
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This review is from: Tempting Fate (Kindle Edition)
The story in this book is utterly believable (although the ending is a tad fairy tale). It had me laughing and crying and it is a excellent page turner. Jane Green's characters are very real and are people you could easily meet in real life. Another great read from this accomplished story teller.


A.A. Gill is Further Away
A.A. Gill is Further Away
Price: £5.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Almost like being there., 23 Jun. 2013
This is a terrific book.

He writes with a real sense of individual style, using metaphors, phrases and ideas which bring the world of travel to life. This is a set of short essays on places, near and far, as well as more general issues, like ageing and dyslexia. Everyone of his pieces makes you ponder about your own views, entertains you with his wit and humour, and simply makes you (well me in any case) think that you could never write as well as he does. Some people might dismiss him as a bit of a clever dick, but I have learned an awful lot from these pieces. He wears his undoubted knowledge very lightly indeed.

There are now places I want to go to as a result of what he's written, and there are places which I'm not sure I ever wanted to go which I'm now absolutely certain, because of what he writes, that I'll never visit.

However, it's his piece on "Dyslexia" which brought me up to a shuddering halt. It appears out of nowhere, and is a real "Good grief, I can't believe that" thought.

All in all, if this book doesn't get your brain whirring and thinking about travelling today, to locations both near and far, then I will be astounded.

Very Highly Recommended.


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