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The Carry On Album: Music from the Films
The Carry On Album: Music from the Films

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fine compilation from the films, 15 Dec 2009
Generally the modern setting films seem to fair better, possibly because the band used had a fair size brass section that could recreate the jazzier arrangements, but was perhaps a couple of violins short of getting impressive washes of strings and which sound a bit light as a result (especially in Cabby, which is otherwise good).

The actual track listing sequence is as follows:

Carry On Camping Suite
- Main Titles
- Come To Paradise / main character themes
- Goings-On!!
- Reconciliation (for the time being) & End Titles
Carry On Suite (based on music in Sergeant, Teacher and Nurse)
Anglo-Amalgamated Fanfare #3
Carry On Cabby
Carry On Theme
Carry On Cleo
Anglo-Amalgamated Fanfare #1
Carry On Jack
Carry On Behind
Anglo-Amalgamated Fanfare #2
Raising The Wind
Carry On At Your Convenience
Carry On Up The Khyber
Carry On Doctor/Carry On Doctor Again Suite
- Main Titles
- Life In Fosdick Ward/Romance In X-Ray
- Chaos!!
- New Nurse In Town - Or Is She?
- End Titles

In general this is a fine compilation of the themes, the selection hardly overlapping with the slightly superior What a Carry On! album and so this would therefore would make a good companion purchase.


Chitty Chitty Bang Bang [DVD] [1968]
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang [DVD] [1968]
Dvd ~ Dick Van Dyke
Offered by MusicnMedia
Price: £4.88

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not the widescreen version, 1 Jan 2009
Ignore the "On the DVD" part of the amazon review, as the version on this DVD is what you would see on a regular TV broadcast, i.e. the ends of the original widescreen shape have been cropped off to make the image 1.33:1 proportions. Only the opening credits (the vintage car race scenes) have the original letterboxed widescreen retained. Other than that it is fine, especially at the current bargain price, but if you want to see the images framed the way they were intended by the film's director then look for the two-disc anniversary edition instead.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 11, 2012 12:52 PM GMT


Graphic Edge
Graphic Edge
by Poynor Rick
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Decoration as design, 15 Sep 2008
This review is from: Graphic Edge (Paperback)
Anthology of chin-stroking 1990s decoration from a selection of mainly American and British-based designers. There is some beautiful-looking stuff here but I can't help wondering about the sheer arbitrariness of much of it.


Crapston Villas - City Of Slummington - The Complete Series 1 [1995]
Crapston Villas - City Of Slummington - The Complete Series 1 [1995]
VHS

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lost classic, 15 Aug 2008
Crapston Villas was originally shown on Channel 4 in the mid-1990s and so far has yet to see release on DVD in this country. It's a real shame because the series seems to have hardly dated at all and is just as revoltingly good now as it was 10 years ago.

When originally broadcast the series comprised ten 10-minute episodes but on the video they are all edited together as a continuously running 100 minute piece. This seems like good value but, because it is comprised of a multitude of short scenes, it begins to feel relentless towards the end. Like trying to consume 10 pints of lager in 100 minutes, you need a break or a change of pace at some point - no wonder the second series was split into two separate video releases.

Worth getting though, it's a satirical snapshot of desperate flat-conversion London life, familiar to anyone who lived in Peckham, New Cross, Streatham, Stratford, Walthamstow, Kilburn, Shepherd's Bush ....


Crapston Villas - City Of Slummington - The Complete Series 1 [VHS Tape]
Crapston Villas - City Of Slummington - The Complete Series 1 [VHS Tape]
VHS

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lost classic, 15 Aug 2008
Crapston Villas was originally shown on Channel 4 in the mid-1990s and so far has yet to see release on DVD in this country. It's a real shame because the series seems to have hardly dated at all and is just as revoltingly good now as it was 10 years ago.

When originally broadcast the series comprised ten 10-minute episodes but on the video they are all edited together as a continuously running 100 minute piece. This seems like good value but, because it is comprised of a multitude of short scenes, it begins to feel relentless towards the end. Like trying to consume 10 pints of lager in 100 minutes, you kind of want a break or a change of pace at some point - no wonder the second series was split into two separate video releases.

Worth getting though, it's a satirical snapshot of desperate flat-conversion London life, familiar to anyone who lived in Peckham, New Cross, Streatham, Stratford, Walthamstow, Kilburn, Shepherd's Bush ....


Tour Climbs: The complete guide to every mountain stage on the Tour de France
Tour Climbs: The complete guide to every mountain stage on the Tour de France
by Chris Sidwells
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £20.10

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Coffee table rather than useful reference, 12 Aug 2008
Best things about this book are the page size (large), the typographic layout (stylish yet well-ordered) and that it is printed in full colour throughout, unlike cycling books by cash-strapped smaller publishers.

As mentioned, the text layout is well structured, with each climb having an introductory side-column of information listing the perceived relative difficulty, length, average gradients, etc, in addition to the main text that deals with the description and Tour history aspects.

However it was a fatal mistake by the publisher and/or author to not include proper maps and gradient profiles. There's a kind of whispy-looking doodle of a map for each climb, placed in the margins of the pages, but the twistiness of a route is less important to riders hauling their weight uphill than knowing more precisely how steep it is going to be at various points and where the changes of gradient pitch will occur. By omitting the potentially useful diagrams that are promised in the sales blurb (see the Product Description) the book has been relegated to the level of a mere coffee table book, rather than the useful reference tool that it could have been. It should have been both really.

I'll skip the copy-editing deficiencies, except to say that these are embarrassing evidence of insufficient time being allowed for proof-reading and corrections.

A lesser complaint is the quality of some of the photographs, which sometimes look over-exposed. In some cases the images look like they have been scanned from low budget prints. I know it can be difficult to photograph a scene in harsh bright summer sunlight on these mountains, where there are extremes of light and shade, but I wish a bit of time was spent doing some digital correction work to hide the technical defects. Generally, I think the layout of the photos nicely integrates them with the text, although the chapter opener spreads are a little bit bland compared to the other pages. Perhaps the openers could have been made more useful by also including, as another reviewer suggests, some kind of regional map marking the relative locations of the climbs included in the chapter.

There are a number of similar books to this one published in France. Most don't have such beautiful typography as Tour Climbs, but they all have more useful diagrammatic information. Of them, the book 'Grands cols - les montagnes du tour de France à velo' (by Nicolas Moreau-Delaquis) is the one closest in form to Sidwells' book, yet it also manages to include full page colour maps and gradient cross-sections as part of the package.

So, in other words, despite Tour Climbs' good points, the ultimate guide in English has yet to be produced. Hopefully, if Collins ever correct the text for a future edition they will also give us some locational maps and include an appendix section of gradient profiles - then we can all award it the 5 star reviews that a book like this ought to have.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 29, 2011 11:12 AM GMT


The Gary McFarland Orchestra - Special Guest Soloist: Bill Evans
The Gary McFarland Orchestra - Special Guest Soloist: Bill Evans

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A gentle classic, 23 Mar 2007
The album (and McFarland's 1966 album, The October Suite' with Steve Kuhn) are great examples of the art of blending jazz piano with classical instruments - in this case string and reed quartets, plus McFarland's vibes. The music here is gentle, wistful and full of interesting instrumental colours in the arrangements that back the vibes and piano. The deft mix of improvisation and ensemble writing is so much better integrated than Evan's later jazz-meets-the-classics effort that showcased Claus Ogerman's lush arrangements. This, on the other hand, I find much more interesting to listen to.

One thing worth pointing out though is that this was equally McFarland's album - the reissue cover photo perhaps suggests otherwise - so you will find that Evan's piano is not as dominant as his Verve 'with orchestra' album. This is an album of what could be described as gentle instrumental pieces with a jazz flavour.

That said, I think it's a great album that showcases Evans outside of his usual jazz trio format and it's a pity they didn't do more work together, though as I mentioned above, the later McFarland/Kuhn album is definitely worth exploring too.


Minimum - Maximum
Minimum - Maximum
Offered by Japan-Select
Price: £58.64

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Live show lacking without the visuals, 12 Jun 2005
This review is from: Minimum - Maximum (Audio CD)
It's nice to have a well-recorded document of how they approach their material nowadays, but some of the atmosphere of the older tracks has gone.
I also feel that the visual side their live show is greatly improved and so the music perhaps is a bit lacking without the accompanying lighting effects and video projections. For anyone who's not had the chance to see them live, maybe it's worth waiting until the DVD is available, so you can see the whole shebang rather than simply listening to the audio layer.
It makes me wonder if the "minimum - maximum" concept is possibly the act of releasing an audio recording first and a video/audio DVD of the same stuff somewhat later... Very droll.


Langweilige Postkarten: Boring Postcards Germany
Langweilige Postkarten: Boring Postcards Germany
by Martin Parr
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £14.95

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Postcard scenes from a postwar world., 2 Nov 2001
This, the third book in the series, is perhaps the most successful. The previous books (of British and American postcards) seemed little more than typical 1950s and 60s retro-kitsch because they lacked the particular historical context that this book has, with its depiction of postwar German society in denial of its catastrophic Nazi past.
These postcard views have no grandiose classical architecture and few scenes that evoke a sentimentalized Germanic past. Instead what we are shown is a calm, clean world of (then) ultra-modern social housing and road networks, of safety and prosperity. All traces of the old pre-war Germany are absent, save for the occasional church spire peeping modestly over the tops of newly constructed facades.


Tour De France
Tour De France
Offered by mecodu-uk
Price: £14.38

23 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Kraftwerk's Cycling classic, 1 May 2001
This review is from: Tour De France (Audio CD)
This CD contains both the 1983 and 1984 twelve-inch single versions of Tour de France. The earlier version was intended to appear on Kraftwerk's abandoned LP 'Technopop' and is the only item from that period to have been released unchanged by later prodction work.

Compare that version, with it's extremely restrained and symmetrical arrangement, with the 1984 remix by Francois Kervorkian (he later worked on Kraftwerk's 1986 'Electric Café' LP) who turned the song into a more dramatically structured near-instrumental, giving it a more intense feel by bringing the percussion much further forward in the mix.

Also included on the CD is the 1983 video, featuring classic b&w footage of the Tour de France, accompanying the German 7" single edit of the song.


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