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Josa Young "Josa Young" (London, England)

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Heavy Duty Clothes Rail Garment Rail 5ft Long x 5ft High SUPERIOR QUALITY
Heavy Duty Clothes Rail Garment Rail 5ft Long x 5ft High SUPERIOR QUALITY
Offered by The Shopfitting Shop
Price: £28.90

5.0 out of 5 stars Genuinely heavy duty rail, 13 Jun. 2015
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Absolutely excellent, very strong piece of kit. Having bought one that claimed to be 'heavy duty' and simply bent when coats were hung on it, I was delighted to have this one to take the strain. Recommended.


Stocking Fillers: Twelve Short Stories for Christmas
Stocking Fillers: Twelve Short Stories for Christmas
Price: £1.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A selection of Christmas snacks..., 13 Jun. 2015
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Poignant, heart-lifting and very slightly 'magical realism' stories all themed about that problematic and emotional time of year - Christmas. I would prescribe these stories to people feeling frazzled and stressed. Young (no relation!) expresses beautifully the unspoken tales of woe behind the hopeful mistakes people make in life and provides some gentle solutions. From Charles, who cannot see that his children's successes can look very different from his rigid expectations (we all know people like that) to Auntie Fay, whose magical gift makes all the difference to her god daughter's day. The far from rare business of dealing with tiresome critical in-laws gets a mention, as does the difficulty of trying not the spoil the kids. Father Christmas, in several of his guises, makes appearances throughout. And I think we have all felt inadequate when leafing through magazines at Christmas and despairing over the perfect coordinated decorations. Rather as we browse on delicious snacks at Christmas, this comforting book works either as individual reads or as a cheering feast.


Hangover Square: A Story of Darkest Earl's Court (Penguin Modern Classics)
Hangover Square: A Story of Darkest Earl's Court (Penguin Modern Classics)
Price: £4.68

5.0 out of 5 stars Drunken delusions of the lonely and dispossessed, 7 April 2015
This modern classic was forgotten for a long time, swept up in the urgent priority of WWII. It was written during the late 30s when economic depression and the still-potent social effects of WWI (which is oddly not mentioned - perhaps because the male characters are all to young to have fought) - the lessening of deference, class fluidity and the comparative emancipation of women - were abiding influences, and published in 1941 when war had swept out the dark and murky corners it depicts. The writing is superb and complete fresh. The central character, George Harvey Bone, is a shambling giant, a minor public school boy without enough private money to sustain a 'gentleman's' leisured lifestyle and no drive to 'lower themselves' by getting a job (a common literary type of the time and also of the 19th century - Trollope and Dickens are littered with them). He is also hampered by mental fugues, 'a new, silent, indescribably eery world' that shut him off from normal moral considerations, and focus him on a golden past when his beloved sister was still alive, that he characterises symbolically as 'Maidenhead'. In this world too, the insult, exploitation and horror of his treatment by failed actress and amateur tart Netta Longdon - which in the 'sane' world he puts up with to an agonising degree - is realised by his carefully plotting to kill her. The other characters who hang around in a kind of boozy limbo include the ghastly fascist Peter and a nasty piece of work with 'school bully eyes'. Hamilton uses repetition beautifully for emphasis, and makes up words like 'moustachy' which in context are so clever and funny and vicious. Highly recommended.


Clovenhoof
Clovenhoof
Price: £2.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An unexpected, laugh-out-loud pleasure to read, 1 April 2015
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This review is from: Clovenhoof (Kindle Edition)
Due to a corporate restructuring of the Afterlife, the Devil, Satan, the Adversary (or whatever you want to call him) finds himself banished to the nearest thing to Purgatory on Earth, ie the Birmingham suburbs. Rejecting 'Nicholas Clovenhoof' as a bit obvious, he settles for Jeremy Clovenhoof. Without anything in his background to help him make his way in the human world, he does his best, from learning to wear shoes on his hooves, adopting a pet mould, serving inappropriate dishes at a dinner party and making friends with his oddball neighbours. Rich with eclectic references (particularly concerning the horrors of corporate culture, the names of all the pagan gods who found themselves transmogrified into demons with the coming of Christianity, history, hagiography and literature) Clovenhoof is a well-written, clever joy. This unusual and unclassifiable book made me laugh out loud on the Tube. I particularly enjoyed the problem of including Leviathan in a planning meeting, as he is three miles long and wouldn't fit around the boardroom table.


How Not to Be a Perfect Mother: The International Bestseller
How Not to Be a Perfect Mother: The International Bestseller
Price: £5.49

5.0 out of 5 stars Comfort for the fumbling parent, 21 Mar. 2015
I absolutely loved this book, which Purves wrote in response to her misgiving about other parenting books available when she had her children which appeared to apply rigid theory or demand perfection. Based on her interviews with dozens of other mothers, it really resonated with me and comforted me. When I had my last baby, when my eldest was 11, she bought it in a charity shop and read it herself to prepare to be a big sister. She loved it too. Purves has such a warm way of writing that I felt supported in my fumblings as I tried to be a good enough mother. 26 years since kick off now and I am still trying.


Kurinji Flowers
Kurinji Flowers
Price: £2.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Read it for a fascinating insight into colonial society before WWII, 7 Mar. 2015
This review is from: Kurinji Flowers (Kindle Edition)
As we all now know, the abuse and exploitation of the young was and is by no means unusual - society's dirty little secret - the full extent only being revealed now, so reluctant debutante Ginny Dunbar's abuse at the hands of her father's friend is entirely credible, and her acceptance of it, as well as its long term effect on her emotional make up. She is a complex, flawed character, and all the more interesting for that, her empathy stunted by her earlier experiences. Flynn's second novel is well-written and plotted, taking us from London to the tea plantations of India before and during the war. It is striking that all the men in her heroine's life are liars, even the most compelling love object. I had quite a lot of sympathy for her husband too as she really was not ever going to be the right kind of wife for such a conventional man. The final chapters rush to a satisfying conclusion, and I stayed up very late to find out what happened. Most interesting and readable is the middle of the book and its accurate depiction of colonial society, revolving around the club and the consumption of gin and gossip, and Ginny's gay friend was the most sympathetic character in the book, her tolerance of his sexual orientation unsurprising given her history. Altogether I recommend Kurinji Flowers as an excellent read, full of period feeling and interesting character development.


100 Great Short Stories (Dover Thrift Editions)
100 Great Short Stories (Dover Thrift Editions)
Price: £6.64

4.0 out of 5 stars Likable, varied but uneven 19th and 20th century stories, 6 Mar. 2015
A varied but uneven selection of stories dating from the 19th into the early 20th century. Not all of them are short stories, for instance Virginia Woolf's The Mark on the Wall is more of an essay or a meditation. Some of them are strange and dated. Some delightful, such as Ring Lardner's The Golden Honeymoon, capturing a certain kind of secure American early 20th century life, and a good lasting marriage in its golden, content evening. A deeply humane, amusing and rather beautiful story from the American sports commentator and humourist who never had a golden evening with his own wife, dying at 48 of tuberculosis, but not before fathering a whole generation or two of writers and journalists. The main joy is reminding me of writers I love, helping me discover writers I have never heard of, and beguiling the hours I spend on the Tube with excellent writing that you seldom find any more - proper and true, ringing like a bell, not clumping along like so much modern writing even in 'literary' books. The excellent value represented by the Dover imprint means that you stock your Kindle very thoroughly with commuter fodder when you buy one of these. I immediately went and bought the complete works of both Virginia Woolf and Katherine Mansfield from the same imprint.


Love Insurance (Illustrated)
Love Insurance (Illustrated)
Price: £1.44

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Daftly amusing, 21 Oct. 2014
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Very enjoyable and rather daft American novel of the 1920s. All about an insurance scam, a mistaken identity (or not), a disappearing heir and plenty of parties and frivolity. The character who writes witty lines for a queen bee provincial hostess is hilarious, particularly when he by mistake writes the same lines for two of them at the same party. Worth a look.


The Making of Us
The Making of Us
Price: £4.74

5.0 out of 5 stars Not for her the easy cliche of the 'central romance', 21 Oct. 2014
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This review is from: The Making of Us (Kindle Edition)
Lisa Jewell is that refreshing thing, a genre busting writer. Not for her the easy cliche of the 'central romance'. She writes her way into a situation and all the way out again. I very much admire her deft use of English, and her characters too. Altogether, she is a new find for me and I can see much enjoyment stretching ahead.


How to be a deb's mum
How to be a deb's mum
by Petronella Portobello
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars What being a deb's mum was like in the late 1950s, 7 Aug. 2014
This review is from: How to be a deb's mum (Hardcover)
Not a non-fiction type guide, but a novel packed with advice on the vexed question of how to bring out your daughters. It came out in 1957, the year before the young Queen Elizabeth II bowed to the prevailing wind and cancelled the Drawing Rooms, where debs were presented at the start of the Season. The Season rumbled on, with the Queen Charlotte's Ball, which had been raising money successfully for the famous maternity hospital for many years, took over as the main launch event. Girls wore white and curtsied to an ancient redundant royal, usually in exile. The moving spirit was Peter Townend, a wonderful British eccentric with an encyclopaedic knowledge of the Season and who everyone was. Today the whole thing is a business, and anyone can be a deb. No longer a tribal initiation for a certain vanished British class, the Gentry, and their aristocratic 'betters'. Read it as an amusing curiosity.


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