Profile for dipesh parmar > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by dipesh parmar
Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,103
Helpful Votes: 917

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
dipesh parmar (Brighton)

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-16
pixel
Home
Home
Price: £9.74

3.0 out of 5 stars Lacking the grace and inspiration of its predecessor `Drift', Nosaj Thing has lost the momentum with `Home'., 3 Feb 2013
This review is from: Home (Audio CD)
Nosaj Things aptly named 2009 debut `Drift' was one of those albums that slowly crept up on you until you just couldn't leave it alone, so stunningly understated an album it was. Anyone familiar with Nosaj's music will instantly appreciate his sound which can only be described as dreamy cinematic hip-hop instrumentals.

Nosaj Thing (aka Jason Chung) returns with `Home', his sound hasn't changed too much since `Drift' but he has added two vocal tracks with album highlight `Eclipse/Blue' featuring Blonde Redhead's Kazu Makino and `Try' featuring Toro Y Moi. Swathes of synths and beats sweep all over `Eclipse/Blue', Makino's serene vocals are hypnotically filtered and fractured, a wonderful blend of colourful electronica. `Try' is less effective, a contemplative sci-fi RnB number that glides along but doesn't really take you anywhere.

Nosaj's sound is quite tricky to latch onto as its often so languid and ephemeral, and although `Drift' worked beautifully i don't think `Home' pulls it off again. There's a simplicity and familiarity to tracks like `Safe', `Distance', `Snap' and `Light#3′ that lacks the subtlety and changes in movement on `Drift'. On tracks like `Glue' you can see that Nosaj is extending his repertoire, but they're not sufficiently interesting enough to test your imagination.

Nosaj Thing's music has a lot of similarities with Lukid, both operating within the blurred boundaries between hip-hop, house, techno, and abstract electronica. Lacking the grace and inspiration of its predecessor `Drift', Nosaj Thing has lost the momentum with `Home'.


The Hunt (Jagten) [DVD]
The Hunt (Jagten) [DVD]
Dvd ~ Mads Mikkelsen
Price: £5.70

21 of 24 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Thomas Vintenberg has directed a near perfect film, `The Hunt' is a gripping and achingly emotional film, 30 Dec 2012
This review is from: The Hunt (Jagten) [DVD] (DVD)
`The Hunt' is the story of Lucas (Mads Mikkelsen), a teacher who is well known and liked in the small community in which he lives. But this soon changes when he is wrongly accused of a crime.

Theo (Thomas Bo Larsen) is Lucas's best friend, and he's not coping too well with family life. Theo's troubled young daughter Klara (Annika Wedderkopp) seeks solace in Lucas and his dog Fanny. Karla oversteps their friendship, Lucas carefully rebuffs her but she interprets it as a rejection. Klara concocts a story that Lucas sexually abused her, and confides in her headmistress Grethe (Susse Wold) who mismanages the situation catastrophically. The school and the parents interrogate Karla, putting words in her mouth when she doesn't know what to say. Worst still, Grethe informs all the parents to look for signs of trauma in their children, and suddenly everyone begins to see signs of abuse that were never there, cue mass hysteria.

We are forced to watch an innocent man bullied, persecuted and ostracised because of the nature of the accusation pointed against him. Lucas's demise contrasts with Klara's position, she's since said to her parents that Lucas was innocent, but they refuse to believe her. This is a world where the innocence of a child is never in question, and its an interesting tactic by director Thomas Vintenberg to show the accuser in a negative light, especially one so young. The opposite is the case for Lucas, who is shown as diligently honest and trustworthy. Lucas is helpless, whether he reacts or not he is seen as the guilty party. Only one person managed to listen to reason throughout the mass hysteria, his close friend Bruun (Lars Ranthe) offering Lucas unwavering support and some much needed pitch-black humour to cope with his ordeal.

Lucas' witch-hunt reveals a community who are quick to resort to illogical and degenerate behaviours. Watching Lucas' story unfold is unbearably tense and extremely powerful. Yet nobody is demonised in the film, everyone has their own understandable motivations and this only increases the tension you feel. Facts are based on lies, gossip and innuendo, not to mention the power adults have over their children. Its also indicative of the paranoid herd mentality not only of adults but also of children, who all fashioned the same story to pin the blame on Lucas. The men in the community are all particularly close, they all including Lucas bonded week in week out like a band of brothers. To see all but one of them betray and remorselessly bully the mild mannered Lucas must have been traumatic, seeing Theo side with his daughter over him must have been devastating.

The acting by the cast is superb, Mads Mikkelsen gives a deeply humanistic and scarring performance. Annika Wedderkopp handles a difficult part with an amazing maturity for one so young . Thomas Vintenberg has directed a near perfect film, `The Hunt' is a gripping and achingly emotional film which will challenge and upset you and is sure to touch a nerve. You realise that this dark and terribly cynical film may be harsh, but its ultimately an indication that its all so very truthful and realistic, such is the world we live in.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 17, 2013 7:58 AM GMT


Untouchable [DVD] (2011)
Untouchable [DVD] (2011)
Dvd ~ François Cluzet
Price: £7.08

8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Cluzet and Sy are an irresistible double-act, directors Olivier Nakache and Eric Toledano have struck comedy gold., 30 Dec 2012
This review is from: Untouchable [DVD] (2011) (DVD)
Based on a true story, `Untouchable' is a comedy about the unlikely friendship between Philippe (François Cluzet) and Driss (Omar Sy). Philippe is a wealthy man, paralysed from the neck down due to a paragliding accident. Tired of the sycophancy and pitying care given to him due to his condition and his wealth, Philippe takes a gamble and hires the brutally frank Driss who only applied for the job to keep the benefits office happy.

Philippe gets far more than he bargained for with the charisma whirlwind that is Driss, a young man who is never afraid to say what he thinks or lower the tone and is guaranteed to keep everybody smiling. Theirs is a cross-cultural friendship, drawn together by their mutual honesty and sense of humour. `Untouchable' is an unashamed crowd-pleaser, the friendship between Philippe and Driss is undeniable and the jokes bounce along at a merry pace. A lot of the humour is based on the clash with cultural stereotypes, the film often lacks subtlety but Sy and Cluzet pull it all off handsomely. There is a lot of playfulness and mischief from both Philippe and Driss, the hilarious opening sequence of Driss speeding through Paris traffic and betting with Philippe that he could get away from the police is priceless.

`Untouchable' is an irreverent take on disability, Driss is hardly subtle with Philippe's condition but his forcefulness and boyish enthusiasm energises Philippe. The film works because Philippe is in on the jokes, it would be too easy for him to be the butt of all the jokes. Philippe is aware of the stuffy bourgeois hypocrisy that he inhabits and perpetuates, and thanks to Driss's anarchic influence plays a great trick on his art dealer. To the films credit there is a lack of sentimentality, nothing is glossed over but its evident what each of their many disadvantages are. Some people may frown at the often patronising stereotyping and the treatment of a character with a disability, but the films heart is in the right place.

Mismatched friendships and cultural clashes are nothing new and `Untouchable' is often predictable, but when Cluzet and Sy click they're an irresistible double-act to burn through any cynicism you may have left. Directors Olivier Nakache and Eric Toledano have struck comedy gold.


Holy Motors [DVD]
Holy Motors [DVD]
Dvd ~ Denis Lavant
Price: £11.99

5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars `Holy Motors' is a paean to film and filmmaking, and the actor's craft. Denis Levant gives the performance of a lifetime, 30 Dec 2012
This review is from: Holy Motors [DVD] (DVD)
Mr Oscar (Denis Levant) is a wealthy middle-aged man, a very busy man with a packed schedule. His secretary and chauffeur Celine (Édith Scob) informs her boss of the first of many appointments. Mr Oscar is not what he at first appears to be. He may be a businessman, but he's also a hobbling beggar woman, a motion-capture actor, an assassin, a father, an underground sewer dweller, and a rich elderly man. These are just some of the many guises that fill Mr Oscars day, each `appointment' is a new scenario for him to inhabit entirely.

The division between performance and reality is blurred, many of Mr Oscars performances are conducted in public, as though its reality television. Each performance starts and ends back in his white stretch limousine, which is not only his transportation but his make-up and changing room. Mr Oscar assumes each new character with the help of various prosthetics, make-up and clothing. We see the craft involved in his transformations from one person to another, and witness the mental and physical agility in him to become each new persona.

When or where does life end and performance begin, is there a difference? `Holy Motors' may or may not be a fantasy, even when Mr Oscar seems to `be himself', is he really who we think he is? Returning home at the end of his long and gruelling day, how do we really know if this is not yet another performance? In the context of the film, it doesn't really matter. As comical and fantastical as `Holy Motors' is, it touches on identifiable human experiences throughout the film to sustain an emotional connection.
`Holy Motors' is a paean to film and filmmaking, and the actor's craft. Denis Levant gives the performance of a lifetime, his chameleonic routine makes him unrecognisable from appointment to appointment, delivering one incredible performance after another. Throw in a fleet of talking limousines, a suburban chimpanzee family, marching accordionists, and far more that's indecipherable, and you've got possibly the strangest film of 2012.

Whatever the director Leos Carax's motives are, having a joke at our expense is too easy an option. `Holy Motors' could be a comment on the human race, of who we are, who we think we are, and who we'd like to be. As puzzling as this film often is, it was a relief to find so little pretension, there is many a pinch of melancholy and substance in Mr Oscar's `life' to remind you of the person behind the many masks, of his troubles as an actor and his own health problems. His multiple lives also reveal the foreboding reality of death, you see it in him whether he is acting or not. Mr Oscar reflects in us all, we see his performances in each and every one of us.

Mr Oscar is asked in the film why does he do it, he replies "For the beauty of the gesture". `Holy Motors' is so open to interpretation, as limitless as Mr Oscar's persona's. I would like to think that he really is the wealthy middle-aged man who has no need to work anymore, he could be all those characters and lead parallel lives, and nobody would know. Tiring as it sounds, wouldn't that be great?


Amour [DVD]
Amour [DVD]
Dvd ~ Jean-Louis Trintignant
Price: £5.75

58 of 63 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars `Amour' is still fundamentally a touching story between two people who are utterly in love with each other till the very end., 16 Dec 2012
This review is from: Amour [DVD] (DVD)
Michael Haneke's `Amour' is the story of an elderly married couple, Georges (Jean Louis Trintignant) and Anne (Emmanuelle Riva), who have to come to terms with the last stages of their life together.

One morning over breakfast, Anne experiences a moment of open-eyed paralysis that changes her life entirely. Anne has an operation which fails, leading to a steady decline in mobility, wheelchair confinement, dementia and finally being bed-bound. Anne never liked hospitals and Georges had to promise Anne that he would never take her back, although Georges keeps his word this arrangement had its own problems as Georges has to cope with caring for Anne.

Haneke rejects the idea that death is a communal experience, Anne's journey towards death is an intensely solitary experience. Only Georges can understand her pain, their daughter (Isabelle Huppert) is marginalised through no fault of her own. Anne's degradation and embarrassment at not being able to look after herself is evidently real and hard to watch. Emmanuelle Riva is a revelation as Anne, revealing the physical indignity and vulnerability of Anne's unravelling state in such a frank and utterly brave performance.

Georges and Anne's relationship releases all sorts of emotions and questions, not least how we adapt and cope within a relationship which is constantly changing, regardless of age. You may not see them kiss, hug, hold hands or even say "I love you", theirs is a love borne of loyalty, kindness and devotion. Its heartbreaking to watch Georges who has spent so many wonderful years building a life together with his beloved Anne, facing up to the reality that she is slowly disappearing before him.

As harrowing as Anne's and Georges deterioration is, `Amour' is still fundamentally a touching story between two people who are utterly in love with each other till the very end.
Comment Comments (5) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 8, 2013 8:17 AM BST


Quarter Turns Over A Living Line
Quarter Turns Over A Living Line
Price: £12.00

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 'Quarter Turns Over a Living Line' just misses the mark, 8 Dec 2012
Raime's debut album `Quarter Turns Over a Living Line' is a foreboding beast, seven songs full of unsettling melancholic visions. The opening `Passed Over Trail' introduces you to a gothic world of gnarled textures, brutal rhythms and sinister ambience. Each track takes its time, nothing is hurried in a world where all things find their own sense of place, eventually.

`The Last Foundry' is a reworking of an old Raime track called `This Foundry', and its a good example of the subtle developments Raime have made in their music by using more live instrumentation. The sound is stripped to the bone, industrial sounds are set on the outer reaches, slow bursts of doomed noise and bass anger the mood which is already fraught and disturbed. `The Last Foundry' and `The Walker In Blast And Bottle' are the only tracks where the tempo increases from a primal crawl.

`Quarter Turns Over A Living Line' is defined by the exhilarating malevolence of the penultimate track `Your Cast Will Tire', where sluggish scraping industrial textures and scolding bowed guitar strings collide, forging the darkest possible matter. `The Dimming Of Road And Rights' is a fitting end to an absorbing but uncomfortable album.

Theres been such a wealth of great albums in the last few years by many bands which encompass the same funereal combinations of metal, industrial, techno, ambient and drone. 'Quarter Turns Over a Living Line' just misses the mark, it doesn't enhance this particular musical line any further.

Rating: 7/10


Sightseers [DVD] [2012]
Sightseers [DVD] [2012]
Dvd ~ Alice Lowe
Price: £4.90

12 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars `Sightseers' is a distinctly English and often bizarre caravanning road movie with plenty of laughs, 25 Nov 2012
This review is from: Sightseers [DVD] [2012] (DVD)
`Sightseers' is the new film from British director Ben Wheatley, who rose to acclaim last year with his mad and totally bad `Kill List'. Anyone expecting `Kill List II' will be very disappointed, as `Sightseers' is a comedy, albeit a very dark one.

The screenplay was actually written by the two leads in the film Steve Oram and Alice Lowe, who play the couple Chris and Tina. They set off on a caravanning holiday, exploring some of Northern Englands finest hotspots such as Crich Tramway Village, Blue John Cavern, and the Keswick Pencil Museum! Clothed in sensible outdoor gear to contend with the English elements, Chris and Tina seem as unassuming and respectable a couple as you'd like to meet on a caravan site.

Crich Tramway Museum is their first destination, and it soon becomes clear that Chris's opinions on the state of British society runs a lot deeper than most people. A rude man who hasn't grasped the concept of bins sends the ginger-bearded Chris over the edge, sparking the first of many gruesome murders. Tina soon becomes aware of Chris' violent tendencies, but her initial shock soon changes once she realises there is method to Chris' madness. There is of course no justification to the violence, their reasons are petty and borne out of frustration and irritation.

We don't know too much about their past, but we know that Daily Mail-hating Chris was forced out of work by bullying and Alice has spent most of her life under the influence of her controlling mother. These twin doormats now share an unbreakable bond, eager to seize the power they've never had and so continue their violent and often farcical journey. Their rage and paranoia is often grotesque and darkly comical, but the longer the film goes on the more inadequate and isolated they become. The ending is inevitable, but will still shock you.

`Sightseers' is a distinctly English and often bizarre caravanning road movie with plenty of laughs, and you'll never want to cross anyone with a ginger beard again! The film doesn't quite carry it off for the whole duration as Chris and Tina's antics can only be taken so far. And its a certainty that Crich Tramway Village, Blue John Cavern, and the Keswick Pencil Museum will have a lot more visitors thanks to this film. But will crotchless knitted knickers be the next fashionable must-have present for Christmas?

Rating 7/10
Comment Comments (6) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 10, 2013 7:16 PM GMT


Diversions 1994-1996
Diversions 1994-1996
Price: £6.59

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lee Gamble's `Diversions 1994-1996′ is a mixtape of a mixtape, but this is no amen break mashup, not by a long shot., 10 Nov 2012
Lee Gamble's `Diversions 1994-1996′ is an album mined entirely from samples taken from his old jungle mixtapes. So it's a mixtape of a mixtape. But this is no ordinary mix, no amen break mashup, not by a long shot.

Gamble was a teenage jungle DJ on pirate radio and various club nights in the genres heyday, so he has history. Gamble focuses on the bits in-between the breaks and the bass, areas that are often overlooked. He keeps all the signature jungle identifiers; the rave horns, the breakbeats, timestretched vocals, the sub bass, the hi-hats and much more. Its all present, but then it isn't quite the same as you would imagine.

Jaw-dropping breakbeats aside, Jungle occupied larges swathes of sonic spaces and its this that Gamble experiments with to great effect. Jungle always had a dualism at its core, a euphoric/dystopic tension which made it so effective. Gamble manages to retain the dizzying highs and paranoid lows of jungle whilst removing practically all the muscle behind the genre, its not till near the end of the album that a recognisable looping breakbeat appears.

`Diversions 1994-1996′ is no reconstruction of the past, its more like a ghost, a dream of a jungle rave that was over a long time ago. I was lucky enough to be consumed by jungle in its prime, and anyone familiar to the scene will no doubt try to piece together the myriad samples used on this cracking album. `Diversions 1994-1996′ is full of shadows and memories, of flickering moments which feel like the aftermath of a rave or even a parallel jungle universe.

The penultimate track `Dollis Hill' offers a hint of some well deserved nostalgia, when you remembered that jungle really did exist and the likes of Photek, 4Hero, A Guy Called Gerald, Goldie, Dillinja, Doc Scott and many dozens of others made a phenomenal contribution to music in such a short space of time. Ok, who can spot the Foul Play sample first?


Intouchables (Édition Collector) (2 DVD)
Intouchables (Édition Collector) (2 DVD)
Dvd ~ François Cluzet
Offered by RX dvds **worldwide delivery available**
Price: £12.97

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Directors Olivier Nakache and Eric Toledano have struck comedy gold., 5 Nov 2012
Based on a true story, `Untouchable' is a comedy about the unlikely friendship between Philippe (François Cluzet) and Driss (Omar Sy). Philippe is a wealthy man, paralysed from the neck down due to a paragliding accident. Tired of the sycophancy and pitying care given to him due to his condition and his wealth, Philippe takes a gamble and hires the brutally frank Driss who only applied for the job to keep the benefits office happy.

Philippe gets far more than he bargained for with the charisma whirlwind that is Driss, a young man who is never afraid to say what he thinks or lower the tone and is guaranteed to keep everybody smiling. Theirs is a cross-cultural friendship, drawn together by their mutual honesty and sense of humour. `Untouchable' is an unashamed crowd-pleaser, the friendship between Philippe and Driss is undeniable and the jokes bounce along at a merry pace. A lot of the humour is based on the clash with cultural stereotypes, the film often lacks subtlety but Sy and Cluzet pull it all off handsomely. There is a lot of playfulness and mischief from both Philippe and Driss, the hilarious opening sequence of Driss speeding through Paris traffic and betting with Philippe that he could get away from the police is priceless.

`Untouchable' is an irreverent take on disability, Driss is hardly subtle with Philippe's condition but his forcefulness and boyish enthusiasm energises Philippe. The film works because Philippe is in on the jokes, it would be too easy for him to be the butt of all the jokes. Philippe is aware of the stuffy bourgeois hypocrisy that he inhabits and perpetuates, and thanks to Driss's anarchic influence plays a great trick on his art dealer. To the films credit there is a lack of sentimentality, nothing is glossed over but its evident what each of their many disadvantages are. Some people may frown at the often patronising stereotyping and the treatment of a character with a disability, but the films heart is in the right place.

Mismatched friendships and cultural clashes are nothing new and `Untouchable' is often predictable, but when Cluzet and Sy click they're an irresistible double-act to burn through any cynicism you may have left. Directors Olivier Nakache and Eric Toledano have struck comedy gold.


Rust and Bone [DVD]
Rust and Bone [DVD]
Dvd ~ Marion Cotillard
Offered by The Happy Zombie
Price: £5.75

11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Jacques Audiard's follow-up to the sublime 'A Prophet' is a thoughtful and often bold film, but certainly not a perfect one., 3 Nov 2012
This review is from: Rust and Bone [DVD] (DVD)
Ali (Matthias Schoenaerts) and his 5 year old son Sam (Armand Verdure) travel from Belgium to the south of France to stay with his sister Anna (Corinne Masiero). With little or no money, Ali plans to start a new life with his son.

Ali finds work as a nightclub bouncer, where he comes to the aid of Stephanie (Marion Cotillard) who is involved in a fight, and therein begins a relationship of sorts between 2 very different people. Stephanie trains and performs with orcas at a local sea park, but after a horrific accident seeks comfort in Ali. She barely knows him, but she sees something in his `operational' approach to life.

Theirs is not a relationship as such, both are lost souls who share a mutual unemotional sense of gratification. When we first meet Ali with Sam, he seems the perfect father. But once they move in with his sister and her husband, he immediately disengages, leaving Anna to pick up after him. Ali tends to Stephanie with more affection and tenderness than his own young son, which is often difficult to watch. Ali starts to box again, and gets involved in bare knuckle fighting for the sheer thrill of it. Stephanie accompanies him, fascinated by another side of life not experienced by many and least of all women. Ali's lack of self-consciousness drives Stephanie to overcome her own obstacles, exemplified by a touching scene where Ali encourages Stephanie to swim again.

`Rust and Bone' is not an easy film to watch, not least for the gruelling subject matter. You are always questioning Ali and Stephanie's relationship, whether its sexual or plutonic. Neither are suited to each other, you couldn't imagine an odder couple, but somehow the director manages to kid you and convince you of their suitability. There is a lack of sympathy from both Ali and Stephanie that connects them to each other. Marion Cotillard yet again shines in a restrained and emotionally complex role, and the pulverising Matthias Schoenaerts is excellent as the uninhibited Ali.

Director Jacques Audiard's follow-up to the sublime `A Prophet' is a thoughtful and often bold film, but certainly not a perfect one. `Rust and Bone' tries so hard to be unsympathetic and unsentimental that it is hard to connect to the characters, you neither love them or hate them. You accept that Ali and Stephanie are what they are and that tensions will undoubtedly follow, but the manipulative climax negated Audiards brazen intentions that worked so well for most of the film.

Rating: 7/10


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-16