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S. Sinclair (UK)
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Normative Ethics (Dimensions of Philosophy)
Normative Ethics (Dimensions of Philosophy)
by Shelly Kagan
Edition: Paperback
Price: 22.80

5.0 out of 5 stars Essential reading for the normative moral theorist, 25 Nov 2013
I think this book has upped my philosophical game. Its primary purpose is not to take a position on the various debates, but to give the moral theorist a map of the logical possibilities and their strengths and weaknesses. It gives you a set of tools with which to approach any normative moral issue with a broader conception of what's possible. This means you can be more inventive in considering possible solutions for whatever issue you're looking at.

For example, I have just started a PhD at Leeds University's IDEA CETL (an offshoot of the philosophy department focused on applied ethics). My first topic was commensurability, for which I considered arguments for value pluralism based on appeals to rational regret cases. Kagan's book allowed me to realise how you can separate questions concerning foundational issues from questions concerning the normative factors that influence us in our ordinary moral thinking (a familiar example being the way a foundational utilitarian might say that we should follow deontological-looking rules in our everyday moral thinking). This made me realise, amongst other things, that being a particularist at the level of ordinary moral reflection doesn't mean you have to be a virtue theorist at the foundational level, and I hope to publish a paper defending this very claim.

If you're going to take normative moral theory seriously, this is essential reading!!


Where The Wild Things Are [DVD] [2009]
Where The Wild Things Are [DVD] [2009]
Dvd ~ Max Records
Offered by DVD Overstocks
Price: 3.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Serious but good, 10 Oct 2011
Just watched it with my 8-year old, and glad I did, though maybe the message went over her head in places.

The "descriptive" message is that we all want our mums/colleagues/lovers to be a certain way for us. But sometimes they won't live up to our expectations, because they're messy emotional creatures with their own needs. The "prescriptive" message is that this doesn't mean we should abandon or destroy our relationships with them. The monsters have to learn this, with some help from the boy. Then the boy has to learn it again when he gets home, in relation to his mum.

I can see how some people might find the film slow or serious. But it's worth it. Not every film you watch has to be a bouncy caper, and this provides a nice contrast to that genre. It conveys its message vividly and emotionally. If we could only learn the lesson we'd probably be happier!


The Rough Guide to France (Rough Guide Travel Guides)
The Rough Guide to France (Rough Guide Travel Guides)
by David Abram
Edition: Paperback

10 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars No help with deciding where to go, 16 Nov 2007
This might be a good guide if you already know whch places you're going to visit - then you could maybe use this guide to decide what to see and where to stay when you get there. But it's no good if you want to decide which towns and regions to visit. Each section starts and ends with detail, detail about the town's main sites and hotels and estaurants, so it feels like you're reading a 1000 page shopping list.

For me what it needs is an intro of one or two pages on each main town with an impresionistic overview of whether it's a good place to go and the good points and bad points. Preferably with more photos.


Philip's Guide to Weather: A Practical Guide to Observing, Measuring and Understanding the Weather
Philip's Guide to Weather: A Practical Guide to Observing, Measuring and Understanding the Weather
by Ross Reynolds
Edition: Paperback
Price: 7.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not bad but, 18 April 2007
Not bad but I didn't find it gave very clear explanations of how the weather works ie the dynamics and laws that explain how weather systems develop. Nor did was there much helpful information about forecasting. The problem was partly that the book spent time on the wrong issues (for me). There was lots of space devoted to describing the weather in different parts of the world (including a lot of unappealing detail at the front and another long section at the back describing weather in different cities). But there was comparatively little space given to explanations of how weather systems work and still less to forecasting. The other problem was that I didn't find the writing very clear. The explanatory material needs an introduction giving an overview of the big picture. For example, it talks a lot about the warm air masses and cold air masses - well, does the whole lower atmosphere consist of these? If not, how do they interact with other parts of the atmosphere? And then, for example, where do winds come from - do they just consist of moving air masses or movements within air masses or what? This kind of overview was lacking. On the other hand, the book is reasonably comprehensive in its coverage. And it would be good for someone who wants to know what the weather is like in different parts of the world.


The Beermat Entrepreneur: What You Really Need to Know to Turn a Good Idea into a Great Business
The Beermat Entrepreneur: What You Really Need to Know to Turn a Good Idea into a Great Business
by Mike Southon
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great to help you decide how much you want to grow, 2 Aug 2005
This is a very helpful book if you want to grow your company to several million pound turnover. It will help you visualise what its like to run a business that grows to that size. This in turn will help you decide if you want to go that route.
He helps you understand why you need a start-up team of five heavyweights if you want to be big. Without that team, your business will stay small. But that's not necessarily the end of the world. If you find it impossible to give up control, or if your business idea is not big enough to support 20+ employees, or finding five heavyweights seems like too much of a commitment before you know if the business works - then stay content with a micro business.
That's what I'm doing. So on the theory espoused in the book, my new businesses won't be multi-million pound turnover. But that still means they can have a turnover of several hundred thousand pounds, and that'll do. I'm very glad I read the book, because it helped me make that decision.
Plus it was a great read. The most enjoyable aspect of the book is it has the authentic voice of experience. That means some of the tips are unexpected, which could throw you out of a rut and make you rethink your approach. For example, he advises employing friends, rather than trying to evaluate strangers (however you must accept that your friendship will suffer!). He also emphasises the importance of getting a sale very early on to establish that your idea is a runner. It seems obvious but I don't remember another business book putting the same emphasis on that.
The Beermat Entrepreneur has stuff you won't find elsewhere. You should read it even if you decide not to go for this approach.


The Beermat Entrepreneur: What You Really Need to Know to Turn a Good Idea into a Great Business
The Beermat Entrepreneur: What You Really Need to Know to Turn a Good Idea into a Great Business
by Mike Southon
Edition: Paperback

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great to help you decide how much you want to grow, 2 Aug 2005
This is a very helpful book if you want to grow your company to several million pound turnover. It will help you visualise what its like to run a business that grows to that size. This in turn will help you decide if you want to go that route.
He helps you understand why you need a start-up team of five heavyweights if you want to be big. Without that team, your business will stay small. But that's not necessarily the end of the world. If you find it impossible to give up control, or if your business idea is not big enough to support 20+ employees, or finding five heavyweights seems like too much of a commitment before you know if the business works - then stay content with a micro business.
That's what I'm doing. So on the theory espoused in the book, my new businesses will only ever grow to maybe 6 - 9 staff. But a business of that size will keep me happy. I'm still very glad I read the book, because it helped me make that decision.
Plus it was a great read. The most enjoyable aspect of the book is it has the authentic voice of experience. That means some of the tips are unexpected, which could throw you out of a rut and make you rethink your approach. For example, he advises employing friends, rather than trying to evaluate strangers (however you must accept that your friendship will suffer!). He also emphasises the importance of getting a sale very early on to establish that your idea is a runner. It seems obvious but I don't remember another business book putting the same emphasis on that.
The Beermat Entrepreneur has stuff you won't find elsewhere. You should read it even if you decide not to go for this approach.


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