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D. Waite (Dorset , UK)
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Push CMC Thumb brace Size 2 Left (19.5-22.5cm circumference)
Push CMC Thumb brace Size 2 Left (19.5-22.5cm circumference)
Offered by Vivomed
Price: 45.15

4.0 out of 5 stars It works (at a price)!, 29 April 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I have to concede that it does what it claims to do. It is small, light, easy to wear and - most importantly - it enables one to use the hand to a much greater degree than anything else I have found. The quality is good and it looks as though it will last for quite a while.

But, one is bound to imagine that a group of company representatives sat around the table to decide how high a price they could comfortably get away with. The actual cost of materials and production cannot be more than, say 5. OK, there would be initial design costs, and the cost of setting up the machinery etc may have been quite extensive. Perhaps they do not sell so many that those costs will be recovered quickly. Nevertheless, a mark-up of 800% seems a bit cynical... Surely the fact that people (including me) will pay this to ease their pain is being taken advantage of. It really deserves 5* but I feel this element has to be reflected.


Arunachala Shiva: Commentaries on Sri Ramana Maharshi's Teachings 'Who Am I?'
Arunachala Shiva: Commentaries on Sri Ramana Maharshi's Teachings 'Who Am I?'
by Premananda
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 13.56

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Valuable insights into Ramana's `Who Am I', 13 Jan 2010
If you want a modern commentary on Ramana Maharshi's `Nan Yar' (`Who am I?'), this is it.

If you want an intelligent re-interpretation of the words, rather than a simple and literal translation, read James Swartz's crystal-clear explanations of some knotty problems (such as the manonAsha - death of the mind concept).

If you enjoy reading fascinating, previously unpublished anecdotes about Ramana's life, read some of the reminiscences that David Godman learned from speaking with those who actually lived in Ramana's presence and experienced his frequent `human' side.

There are also chapters containing the autobiographies of the three contributors themselves. David Godman tells of his experiences with Nisargadatta and his curious relationship with Papaji. James Swartz relates the story of his colorful path from reprobate to close associate of Swami Chinmayananda. Premananda tells the story of his travels around the world, by way of Osho and Papaji, to his present community in Germany.

And, if you just want a beautiful book, with lots of wonderful, glossy, full-color photographs of Ramana, his disciples, Arunachala and Ramanashramam, Premananda has put together exactly the book for you. His insightful interviewing elicits some marvelous material, both biographical and spiritual. There is even a pull-out, diagrammatic map, showing the key features around the mountain and a preview DVD of the companion film of Ramana's life and teaching.

I cannot recommend this superb book too highly if you are at all interested in the teaching of Ramana Maharshi or the stories of seekers who found what they were looking for.

Dennis Waite, author of Back to the Truth: 5000 years of Advaita


Wordplay: The Philosophy, Art, and Science of Ambigrams
Wordplay: The Philosophy, Art, and Science of Ambigrams
by John Langdon
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Metaphor for Non-Duality, 22 Nov 2009
A totally original and completely fascinating investigation into the way in which many fundamental concepts in life and science are effectively reconciliations of opposites. What we might initially think of as entirely different concepts or feelings may be just opposite poles of a single idea. Happiness and misery, desire and fear, love and hate are obvious examples. Here, Professor John Langdon begins and ends with the Taoist concept of yin and yang and the ancient divination system of the I Ching. But along the way he examines many aspects of the physical world - from astronomy to electricity and mathematics; the natural word - such as seasons and waterfalls; and the world of art and beauty. In each case, he provides stimulating insights into ways of looking at these subjects which will usually not have occurred to us. But - and this is the totally novel brilliance of the book - each topic is illustrated by his wonderful ambigrams. In their basic format, these are words which read the same upside down but here there are many variants, from mirror-image ambigrams to circles, spirals and 3-D models. And the concluding section explains the process of development of this intriguing art form. This is a book that you can pick up and delve into anywhere and enjoy.

If you are wondering why the book should be relevant to Advaita, it is because the ambigram can be seen as a powerful metaphor. Firstly, it presents the appearance of duality but, on investigation is found to be only one - a resolution of seeming opposites. Secondly, the recognition that the symbol is an ambigram does not usually occur immediately. It is only after a period of study and contemplation that the realization suddenly occurs. In this sense, it is a metaphor for the enlightenment that takes place in the mind on the dawning of Self-knowledge. Lastly, appearances should not be taken at face value. If we look beyond the name and form, as John does in this book, we may discover the unity behind the outward show. Overall, a highly recommended book. (And this has nothing to do with the fact that John has also designed the triple ambigram for the cover of the second edition of `Book of One'!)

Dennis Waite, author of The Book of One (N.B. If the image on the 'Book of One' cover that you see is not an ambigram, it is the wrong one! This is the case as I write this review.)


Making Time: Why Time Seems to Pass at Different Speeds and How to Control it
Making Time: Why Time Seems to Pass at Different Speeds and How to Control it
by Steve Taylor
Edition: Paperback
Price: 8.99

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Definitely NOT a time waster!, 12 May 2009
Discover the five `Laws of Psychological Time', which explain why it is that time does not seem to run as `regular as clockwork'. We are all familiar with time going slowly when we are bored or all too quickly when we are enjoying ourselves. Thoroughly researched, this book provides straightforward and well-reasoned explanations for all of our temporal experiences. I found myself saying "that's exactly what I thought" on many occasions but Steve Taylor not only describes everything in a logical, stepwise manner but then goes on to derive practical strategies for making use of the theory, effectively to extend our perceived span of life. Along the way, he also demonstrates why it is that meditation is so beneficial and investigates the so-called paranormal and higher states of consciousness. Altogether an entertaining, thought-provoking and worthwhile read.

Dennis Waite, author of Back to the Truth: 5000 Years of Advaita


Layers: The Complete Guide to Photoshop's Most Powerful Feature
Layers: The Complete Guide to Photoshop's Most Powerful Feature
by Matt Kloskowski
Edition: Paperback
Price: 28.68

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Justified acclaim!, 20 April 2009
I bought this because of the many good reviews. Having received it, I was initially a bit skeptical - it is fairly thin, with most pages being divided into two, with a couple of photos and a small amount of text. It looked somehow insubstantial. Upon starting to work through it, however, its power became apparent. It covers what must be practically everything that you can do with layers, revealing some amazing techniques that require very little effort. Easy to follow and delivers the promised results!

Dennis


Complete Guide to High Dynamic Range Digital Photography (Lark Photography)
Complete Guide to High Dynamic Range Digital Photography (Lark Photography)
by Ferrell McCollough
Edition: Paperback
Price: 15.29

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Impressive photos!, 20 April 2009
There are some very impressive photos, which should easily persuade you that HDR photography is worth investigating. All the major software packages are examined and their virtues compared. Workflows and ways of circumventing the problems associated with the technique are amply described.

The science behind the process remains a mystery and the operation of the software is largely intuitive, essentially involving moving the various sliders up and down until you get a result that you like. Consequently, the need for a book such as this might be questioned. However, on balance, I think that there is sufficient background and guidance to justify it. Also, as I say, the photos sell it on their own!

Dennis


The Student's English-Sanskrit Dictionary
The Student's English-Sanskrit Dictionary
by Vaman Shivaram Apte
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 19.59

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Mostly successful so far, 19 April 2009
Since my memory is not so brilliant these days, I wanted this book principally to look up those spiritual terms which I knew I had encountered but could not remember. Having used it now a number of times, I reckon the success rate is probably around 80%. The failures may, however, be my own fault! The book is clearly aimed at students studying the language and contains such distinctly unspiritual words as 'telephone' and 'electric'. This means that there are very many words that are not relevant to my purpose and whose presence is likely to create a 'wood for trees' effect. Also, the quality of printing is not always perfect. Apart from that, it serves the purpose well!

Dennis Waite, author of Back to the Truth: 5000 Years of Advaita


Digital Painting in Photoshop
Digital Painting in Photoshop
by Susan Ruddick Bloom
Edition: Paperback
Price: 19.44

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Too much wasted space, 19 April 2009
Describes how to use Photoshop to produce painterly effects in existing photos. The techniques described can mostly be easily adapted to other software. Covers charcoal, pastel, watercolor, oil, impasto and pen and ink illustration style, taking you through the processes step by step.

My complaint, really is that far too much space is taken up with images of screen-shots from Photoshop. Whole pages simply reproduce the menus which (assuming you have the software, you have to call up in order to select the option anyway). There are 70 pages of this (out of 227) before the tutorials even begin. Other, whole page photos show, for example, selecting the 'Find Edges' option, when simply saying 'Select Filter/Stylize/Find Edges' would be perfectly adequate. If such, essentially redundant material were omitted, the book would be much thinner... and cheaper!

Having said that, there are some very nice effects, the photos used are interesting and the descriptions of what to do easy to follow.

Dennis


The Art of Digital Photo Painting: Using Popular Software to Create Masterpieces (A Lark Photography Book)
The Art of Digital Photo Painting: Using Popular Software to Create Masterpieces (A Lark Photography Book)
by Marilyn Sholin
Edition: Paperback
Price: 11.01

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good for Beginners, 19 April 2009
A very good introduction to Corel Painter for those new to the software who want to use it primarily for manipulating existing photographs. Painter is a complex package and it is not easy to find one's way around so that a book such as this is definitely needed. However, it does not go much beyond the basic automatic functions. Also, space is devoted to additional (and expensive) plug-in components which most users will probably not want to buy. It is large-format, very colorful and the manipulated photos are impressive.

Dennis


Grandpa's Notebooks: The Evolution of an Amish Soul
Grandpa's Notebooks: The Evolution of an Amish Soul
by Orva Schrock
Edition: Paperback
Price: 11.26

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Search for meaning, 27 Mar 2009
I think I can honestly say that I have never read a book quite like this one. I guess one would have to describe it as a sort of autobiography of one man's fight to overcome childhood adversity and find meaning in his life through constant spiritual searching. The early material is presented through poems and diary-like entries taken from key moments in the author's life. The latter part records his Amazon reviews of books that proved particularly helpful and the subsequent emails that he sent to readers who communicated with him as a result of these.

This is not a story, nor a book about spirituality, in that it does not teach any specific ideas (though he does recommend some excellent books en route). It is not even a biography in the usual sense. But it is a very sincere and positive book - and very well written, in a literary and poetic style. Few will have experienced such adversity in their life and the way in which the author faces this head-on, tries to understand and explain, and finally reconcile his experiences, is a testament to the resilience and indomitability of the human spirit.

Dennis Waite, author of Back to the Truth: 5000 Years of Advaita


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