Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 50% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Listen in Prime Shop now Shop now
Profile for Humming-bird > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Humming-bird
Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,114,494
Helpful Votes: 36

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Humming-bird "MMMmmmm" (UK)

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2
pixel
G428 Blue Black Unisex Reading Glasses +2.0 Stylish
G428 Blue Black Unisex Reading Glasses +2.0 Stylish

2.0 out of 5 stars Not ver robust, 22 April 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
These broke almost as soon as I bought them. The nylon cord that holds the lens in kept pinging out of its groove so that the lens fell out. Really annoying. I ditched them in the end. Nice little matching case though.


Women's Reading Glasses - Flower +2.00 - Includes Free Carry Pouch
Women's Reading Glasses - Flower +2.00 - Includes Free Carry Pouch
Offered by Quality Specs

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pretty specs, 22 April 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Hard wearing yet pretty. You can be quite rough with frames and they can take it. At this price you can buy a few pairs!


Rubbernecker
Rubbernecker
by Belinda Bauer
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Another great tale from Belinda Bauer, 22 April 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Rubbernecker (Paperback)
This could be Bauer's best novel yet. A little gory, but with great twists of fate for an entirely plausible string of characters. Coming from Wales as I do, I enjoyed and recognised the settings in both Cardiff and the Brecon Beacons, and the descriptions of such classic occasions as Cardiff on a match day when Wales are playing at home. I also liked the cameo character of the policeman who finally solves the crime, or thinks he has.
I love Bauer's style. Quietly witty, really well observed characters and settings and well thought out process to her plotting. This time she has obviously excelled herself in researching her subject in minute detail. however, I don't think this leading boy,Patrick, is likely to take the stretch to a trilogy, as with Bauer's previous novels, which is a shame. I loved him. Looking forward to whatever this author is going to dream up next.


Ding Dong! The Witch Is Dead
Ding Dong! The Witch Is Dead
Price: £0.69

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 2013, 22 April 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
It just had to be done! We all sang along in private.... Even though the great bell of Westminster fell silent as others paid their last respects. Each to his own.


Mr Rabbit and the Lovely Present
Mr Rabbit and the Lovely Present
by Charlotte Zolotow
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Had to buy this book yet again!, 22 April 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
My children loved this story two and a half decades ago. I am still buying it as a children's gift whenever I find a child who does not know the book - and it never disappoints. A classic.


The Bunny Who Found Easter
The Bunny Who Found Easter
by Charlotte Zolotow
Edition: Paperback
Price: £4.92

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lovely book for learning about seasons., 22 April 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Beautifully written which is no surprise. No religious references, just a very sweet story that takes the bunny on a search for Easter (spring) via all the seasons. Lovely story and and illustrations.


Fly London Mol Women's Boots
Fly London Mol Women's Boots
Price: £57.31 - £145.00

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Safety & Cleaning tip for these lovely boots., 30 Sept. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
First off....I do love these boots. They are stylish and comfy to wear all day long and I love the colour PETROL. I just want to point out two important things.
Firstly, as another reviewer pointed out, they can be slippery in the wet. Save them for cold, dry days, when you will love the warmth and comfort and style they provide.
Secondly, I scuffed mine quite badly and discovered that it was difficult to match the colour with a polish or cream. BUT eventually I discovered a perfect match so I thought it might be worth passing on the info.
WOLY shoe and leather cream have a colour called Caribbean. (available on Amazon) In some places it is called Carribean Green, in others it is Carribean Teal. I think they are one and the same thing. Anyhow, my boots look FAB again and are ready for another winter. Bring it on!


The Hour I First Believed
The Hour I First Believed
by Wally Lamb
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Phew!, 19 Jun. 2012
Not a light or easy read, this. But go for it. It's well worth it.
I particularly love the honesty and vulnerability of the central character, Caelum Quirk. He can be funny, sweet, sincere, annoying and chauvenistic by turns. He's just some ordinary guy.
The first section that deals with the Columbine shootings is so different in not only content but style to the middle section, dealing with Caelum's family, that it could have been written by someone else. However, eventually the styles meld together as the story resolves itself and we see how Caelum came to be the person he is. It's a sad story but also one full of hope. It covers a multitude of difficult subjects in a humane and respectful way.
This is the first book I've read by this author but it won't be the last.


When God was a Rabbit
When God was a Rabbit
by Sarah Winman
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Has to be worth 5 stars, 19 Jun. 2012
This review is from: When God was a Rabbit (Paperback)
I truly loved this book. I found it curiously old fashioned at first but in a very relaxing and positive way. Then the plot lines came in one by one and I just couldn't put it down. I loved the fact that real historic events were interwoven with the plot, giving a sense of time and place to the events in the novel, and a look at how those would have affected (or not) the characters and the shape of the story.
This is a story of (amongst other things) how a secret can affect the entire lives of those who know and keep it. That once known, it can never be unknown.
I am massively looking forward to the next book from this writer, and would like to say to her "no pressure" - but after this novel I think there just might be!


A Country Cathedral Organist Looks Back
A Country Cathedral Organist Looks Back
by David Gedge
Edition: Paperback

10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Pied Piper of Brecon, 1 Jun. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
David Gedge has led an interesting, if charmed life as organist and choir master at Brecon Cathedral and Head of music at Builth Wells High School. A pied piper of a man, gathering children and young people with an ear for music to follow him.
However, the style of his writing I found tedious in the extreme, because there is so little light and shade. These are the disjointed ramblings of a man who does not take criticism and therefore self publishes to avoid the editing process. A pity, because an editor might have explained that he comes over as petty and small minded in recounting quite so many quibbles with this person or that. Or that describing the times and places he or his choir boys had stopped for a pee en route to wherever, might be considered a little dull to the average reader.
But persevere with the two books and you discover that David Gedge actually lacks any real emotion. How anyone could, in the same paragraph where they describe their only daughter as having been newly diagnosed with breast cancer, finish that same paragraph with the phrase "It was indeed a golden age" just beggars belief.
Gedge is fond of quoting any letters praising him, relentlessly so. He proudly quotes the blog of Kenneth Woods, who wrote of him in 2006, "He has built his choir not from the children of the great and the good, but with young people from disadvantaged backgrounds, broken homes and profoundly challenging circumstances." In some cases that may indeed have been true; some could have been quite vulnerable, and if so, a place of safety would have been paramount. Yet from this memoir, it is clear that Gedge doesn't appear to understand his obligations to them or see any virtue in the protection of children generally. In fact he seems to resent it. In 1999 he remembers "Other problems were arising at the Cathedral. Dean Geraint was still anxious to persuade people to sit in at the youngsters' choir practices so as to comply with an EEC ruling on the supervision of young people." There is no love lost between Dean Geraint and David Gedge. Perhaps because Dean Geraint could, and often did, put Gedge in his place. Or perhaps because Dean Geraint did not share David Gedge's and his lay clerks' obsession with alcohol, which is abundantly clear in this book.
Gedge recalls "an unhappy incident in the history of the diocese", when a clergyman friend, who was about to be made a Canon, was arrested for a number of serious sex offences against boys. Perhaps not unusually in the church, Gedge does not name his friend and colleague, even though the man had no legal right to anonymity. (In 1994 Rev Stephen Brookes was convicted of nineteen sex offences against eight children and sentenced to 4 years in prison.) But it is Gedge's comments on the outcome of the trial that seem so bizarre. He says "this was exceedingly tragic, because he was undeniably a priest with both vision and charisma, who could get things done; what was so sad was that he had been let down by an uncontrollable personal weakness." He makes absolutely no mention of the children who had been abused, the ordeals they had suffered, the affect on their lives and those of their families. Yet he continued to extol the virtues of an ex-clergyman and registered sex offender.
So it may not come as too much of a shock to learn that, at the time of writing, David Gedge has himself come under police investigation both in the UK and Ireland, for serious sex offences against a cathedral chorister, and that (to quote the previous reviewer) the "brilliant accounts of colourful choir tours abroad" could have been a lot more colourful than Gedge actually painted them. The phrase "selective memory" springs to mind, as he has left out significant episodes of his life as a plain old "Country Cathedral Organist". And although there are occasions he may not choose to remember, there are others who will never quite be able to forget.
I am awarding David Gedge's two volume autobiography just one star for readability, style and content. However, I sincerely hope he finds himself with enough time on his hands to write a third.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 2, 2012 12:34 PM BST


Page: 1 | 2