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Profile for Ciaran O'Connor > Reviews

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Ciaran O'Connor

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The Psychodynamics of Social Networking: Connected-up Instantaneous Culture and the Self (The Psychoanalysis and Popular Culture Series)
The Psychodynamics of Social Networking: Connected-up Instantaneous Culture and the Self (The Psychoanalysis and Popular Culture Series)
Price: £21.37

4.0 out of 5 stars Bold and trailblazing but not an easy read, 11 May 2014
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This book is right on the money with its topic and I was, and remain, very pleased to have found it. It serves as a solid investigation of how social networking integrates into existing psychotherapeutic models. The references are frequent and useful, although with a reliance on quoting and an absence of research.

Some chapters are much better than others. In general the first half and the conclusion were very engaging with a definite low point in between. During the weaker points, the book becomes overly complicated and dry with too much emphasis on convoluted sentences and theories.

I'll be checking out for more books by Balick; while his accessiblity could improve a little, his thinking is way ahead and that's mighty impressive


The Fix
The Fix
Price: £3.99

3.0 out of 5 stars Melodramatic, journalistic and with a skewed concept of addiction, but interesting nonetheless., 15 April 2014
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This review is from: The Fix (Kindle Edition)
Thompson seems to have a 'soft' interpretation of addiction that blurs having a problematic dependence with simply really,really liking something. This undermines most of the book and leaves his laboured point about the recent wave of addiction somewhat dead in the water.

However - there are plenty of well researched historical references here that are brought together to produce some interesting ideas. I would also say that two of the book's concepts - that of addiction relying, in part, on availability and also of addiction being the replacement of people with things, are excellent takeaways. Plus it's a breeze to read through!


Couple Counselling: A Practical Guide
Couple Counselling: A Practical Guide
Price: £17.15

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars wonderfully pragmatic!, 1 April 2014
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This is perhaps one of the most 'feet on the ground' guides to counselling I have come across. It is excellently pitched towards the individual therapist looking to move into couples work and provides a hugely accessible and inclusive framework. The humility of the writing and the case studies makes you feel like the author is actually talking about therapy, rather than the tidy stuff of fairy tales that most other counselling books are so often riddled with. Great, reliable stuff; does what it says on the tin!


When Gaming becomes an Obsession: Help for Parents and their Children to Treat Online Gaming Addiction
When Gaming becomes an Obsession: Help for Parents and their Children to Treat Online Gaming Addiction
Price: £4.45

3.0 out of 5 stars very light weight, 5 Nov. 2013
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This book is far too short and cursory. It seems to be little more than a marketing tool for the netaddiction business. It's a shame as Kimberley Young is so switched on about this topic. What points it makes are relatively good points, though it comes from a disease model which I don't subscribe to.


The Demise of Guys: Why Boys Are Struggling and What We Can Do About It
The Demise of Guys: Why Boys Are Struggling and What We Can Do About It
Price: £1.49

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Overblown but Interesting, 27 Aug. 2013
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I found much of the research and arguments to be poorly justified or superficial. Additionally, the book relies upon a very out-dated and heavily gendered viewpoint. Nonetheless, the book makes a number of very interesting points and provides a particularly sound and positive conclusion.


Reset: Psychotherapy & Video Games, 2nd Edition
Reset: Psychotherapy & Video Games, 2nd Edition
Price: £5.46

4.0 out of 5 stars An Excellent Challenge, 7 July 2013
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This book is a noble challenge to many of the stigmas and judgements that are baked deep into the core of psychotherapy. Langlois's focal point, that gaming is pathologized by psychotherapists, is of importance and worth, but it is his closing outcry against the closed-minded and secretive culture in which many therapists work that punches the hardest. May he trailblaze a new era of psychotherapy where practitioners strive to use one another's assets rather than merely compete. As it stands, everyone loses, most importantly the client.

A criticism of this text would be that it does not seem sure of its audience. Much of the jargon and advice seemed to be aimed at gamers, whereas other portions were directly focused on psychotherapists and their practice. The book is pleasantly succinct, however, so I would recommend it to either; though I feel it is more politically urgent that this text is picked up by mental health professionals.

Get a raid mentality. Great Stuff.


Skills in Existential Counselling & Psychotherapy (Skills in Counselling & Psychotherapy Series)
Skills in Existential Counselling & Psychotherapy (Skills in Counselling & Psychotherapy Series)
by Emmy Van Deurzen
Edition: Paperback
Price: £20.55

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Much Needed Practical Perspective, 12 Sept. 2011
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The tradition of existential psychotherapy has been dogged by its reputation as a vague, overly academic and ultimately impractical discipline since inception. Therapists have been given an emphasis on being and not doing, and any apprehensions they might have as to how they should actually act in the relationship is passed off as being grist for the mill of anxiety.

This book begins to construct a very clear set of practical guidelines for the existential therapist to follow, while at same time staying with the strong philosophical and client-focused tradition it springs from. Therapists are given a framework of understanding anxiety and depression that is highly adaptable to clients and other varying models, while at the same time allowing an understanding of existential givens to inform the work.

The book is well structured into punchy chapters, regular fly-outs and sub-sections that allow the user to quickly navigate the text and pull out useful sections as and when needed. Its regular mix of formats and styles means that the existentialism, content that is far too often presented as inaccessibly as possible, is made very available for both the persuser and the cover to cover reader alike.


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