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LollyDolly

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3.0 out of 5 stars A tiny bit disappointed, 8 Nov 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I really liked this design when I saw it on the site, and it's equally nice in the flesh.

My issue is that the pattern does not continue around the sides of the case. Instead, the sides are clear texturised plastic.

I think this makes the case look a little cheap, and I probably wouldn't have ordered it if I'd have realised.

Clearer pictures, including a side-view, are needed for these cases. I really think you need to improve on this, Ecell people.

Apart from that, the case fits well and seems fine.


Lotus Women's Arlington Brown Fur Trimmed Boots 4886 7 UK
Lotus Women's Arlington Brown Fur Trimmed Boots 4886 7 UK

4.0 out of 5 stars Happy Feet, 8 Nov 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I have the same struggle to find kneehigh boots each winter.

I try on a load, don't like any of them, then stick to my Ugg-style boots, which feel about as useful as wrapping newspaper around your feet once the wet weather sets in.

I am so plesantly surprised by these boots, I actually like them! The quality of the leather is good, I especially like the colour, and the fit is comfortable. The sheepskin lining is a lovely touch on colder days, and thus far they are waterproof- yay! I scotchgarded them straight away as the leather is so soft I think it'd probably stain easily otherwise.

They are a good fit for slightly wider calves, I think they fit up to around 16", but not ideal if your calf is very wide as they are not adjustable. They also are quite flattering to the leg, being a nice height (finishing about an inch or so below the knee on me, and I'm above average height) I was worried about the slightly funny dip at the back of the boot, but it really makes the boot more comfortable, especially when sitting down or driving. I don't think it really alters the look of the boot from the back either, I've had lots of compliments on them so they must be doing ok!

They are a slightly wider fit than cheaper boots, so if you tend to hover between two sizes, get the smaller. They aren't dramatically bigger though, as some earlier comments suggested.

The only reason the don't get 5 stars is because they are slightly fiddly to get on, due to the half-zip thing which means that your skinny jeans can ride up a bit as you pull the tops up. Just a small niggle, though...

So, all in all I'd definitely recommend them. They're not cheap but I think they'll be worth it in the long run.


Richard Okon: Prefab
Richard Okon: Prefab
by Wayne Hemingway
Edition: Paperback

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fab Prefabs, 24 Oct 2011
This review is from: Richard Okon: Prefab (Paperback)
Although this book was bought as a gift for a friend who loves Prefabs, I did get a chance to flick through it with her, and I was very impressed (and, more importantly, so was she!)

The photos are beautifully done, and the book captures the emotional connection many people felt, and still do feel, about their Prefabs.

Really, the book focuses on the lives of people who lived in the Prefabs, and how they felt about them, rather than being an historical account of prefabricated housing. After the war, when so many people lived in squalid conditons in run-down Victorian terraces, Prefabs represented a spacious, clean and ultra modern way of life. Most people who managed to move to a prefab felt extremely lucky and loved their new homes... even into the '70s when they started to be destroyed to make way for more modern housing stock.

Built as a temporary housing solution, many people still lived in their Prefabs 20 or 30 years after they moved into them. Most have now been demolished, but many of the previous residents still miss living in them, and look back very fondly on their lives there.

The book captures this sense of pride and post-war modernity perfectly, and is a very interesting snapshot into prefab life.


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