Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 70% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now
Profile for Methods & Tools Software Development Magazine > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Methods & ...
Top Reviewer Ranking: 4,393,674
Helpful Votes: 27

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Methods & Tools Software Development Magazine (Vevey Switzerland)

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2
pixel
The Scrum Field Guide: Practical Advice for Your First Year (Agile Software Development Series)
The Scrum Field Guide: Practical Advice for Your First Year (Agile Software Development Series)
Price: £22.00

5.0 out of 5 stars The Practical Side of Scrum, 13 Sept. 2012
Scrum offers minimal guidelines for agile project management. In this book, Mitch Lacey provides Scrum practitioners with material that should help them improve their Scrum practices. Each chapter starts with a story that put the topic in perspective. It is followed by a discussion on the conceptual aspects. At the end of the chapter, a "Keys to Success" part summarizes the important content of the chapter and a reference section provides pointer to additional knowledge. I have particularly appreciated the chapters about the sprint length determination, doing new development and maintenance at the same time or the sprint emergency procedures. The book is easy to read and I will recommend this book to every Agile practitioner and every non-Agile practitioner too ;O)


Management 3.0: Leading Agile Developers, Developing Agile Leaders (Addison-Wesley Signature Series (Cohn))
Management 3.0: Leading Agile Developers, Developing Agile Leaders (Addison-Wesley Signature Series (Cohn))
by Jurgen Appelo
Edition: Paperback
Price: £27.19

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars All models are wrong but some are useful, 5 Aug. 2011
In his foreword, Robert C. Martin wrote that he hates management book, but "this book is smart". I think that this book might be smart because Jurgen is smart. If I tried to summarize what you get from his book, you can consider Jurgen Appelo as the hidden son resulting from a relationship between a Springer Verlag journal's editor and Mike Cohn, with some influence from Aardman Studios in the education. You will therefore jump from sentences like "It is often seen as the opposite of reductionism, although complexity scientists believe that complexity is the bridge between the two, and both are necessary but insufficient [Corning 2002:69]" (I hope that you have all recognized the definition of "holism") to a checklist for a Agile Goals that contains questions like "is the goal manageable and measurable so that success can be determined?" You will therefore go back and forth between high level system or behavioral theories and practical management situations and practices. Despite its high theoretical content, the book is very enjoyable and easy to read and you shouldn't be afraid by what could appear initially as a strong theoretical content.

Jurgen Appelo is so smart that he even make the own assessment of his book at the end, based on the quote that "all models are wrong but some are useful" He says "It makes no sense discussing which idea is wrong, because they all are. The real challenge is in finding which ideas is useful in what context". I think that reading his book will provide you with a larger ideas' toolkit and help you assess which ideas might be useful in a particular context for your project management journey.


Managing Software Debt: Building for Inevitable Change (Agile Software Development)
Managing Software Debt: Building for Inevitable Change (Agile Software Development)
by Chris Sterling
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This book provides meaningful insights on how to prevent creating too much debt, 5 Aug. 2011
Technical debt has become a trendy term for an issue that exists since the beginning of software development projects. It is what happens when you neglect, consciously or not, the long-term quality of your software to achieve other usually short term benefits. After defining the concept of software debt, Chris Sterling explores the topic of managing software debt in all software development activities. Three chapters are dedicated to the topic of design and architecture, discussing how they should fit in Agile approaches.

As its title suggests, this book goes even further than the concept of technical debt as it try to cover all dimensions of software development debt. My favorite chapter comes at the end where the notion of experience debt is explored. I have witnessed many projects where the technical or product knowledge was concentrated on fewer and fewer people, due to change in project team composition, effectively making them the bottlenecks where all application evolutions had to be processed. We sometimes create more debt in the heads than in the code.

The book is well written and easy to read. Every chapter begins with a mindmap of the topic that will be explored, thus giving a big picture of its content. The material mixes high level definitions with practical examples and real life stories. A summary is proposed at the end of each chapter

At every stage of the software development life cycle, we make decisions that have long term consequences. This book provides meaningful insights on how to prevent creating too much debt and how to reduce the existing burden. I will recommend it to everybody who is concerned with software quality with a longer view than the end of the next iteration.


Agile Software Requirements: Lean Requirements Practices for Teams, Programs, and the Enterprise (Agile Software Development)
Agile Software Requirements: Lean Requirements Practices for Teams, Programs, and the Enterprise (Agile Software Development)
by Dean Leffingwell
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £28.79

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A detailed and extensive study of the agile gathering and management of requirements in enterprises, 5 Aug. 2011
Although many might tend to limit the concept of agile requirements to "user stories", this book reminds us that there could be more than just a post-it on an information radiator when we talk about requirements. The title of one of the initial chapters is "The Big Picture of Agile Requirements" and this book provides it, together with the small details that can help you write better stories.

Dean Leffingwell describes the general context of managing requirements in organizations based on a three levels view: portfolio, program and team. The concept of requirements is different at each of these levels: from the investment themes and epics of the enterprise strategy to the user stories implemented by teams during Scrum sprints. An interesting concept developed in the book is the Agile Release Train (ART) that aggregates user stories in features set. The goal is to adjust the team's capacity to produce software with the ability of customers to absorb it.

The book is very well written, achieving balance between a structured approach and easiness to read. It contains many case studies, templates and sample agenda that help relate the ideas expressed with the daily activities. Three appendixes at the end propose interviews and document templates, along with a release-planning checklist.

This book provides a detailed and extensive study of the agile gathering and management of requirements in enterprises and I will recommend it to everybody involved in some software requirement activity, from the business analyst to the project manager or developer.


Lean-Agile Acceptance Test Driven Development: Better Software Through Collaboration (Net Objectives Lean-Agile)
Lean-Agile Acceptance Test Driven Development: Better Software Through Collaboration (Net Objectives Lean-Agile)
by Ken Pugh
Edition: Paperback
Price: £27.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Improve your communication with end users and your understanding of requirements., 5 Aug. 2011
Acceptance tests are defined in this book as the test created by the customer in collaboration with the developer and the tester prior to implementation. They are not the traditional user acceptance tests performed after implementation. Although acceptance tests can be used at different development stages, Ken Pugh proposes mainly in this book an approach where all project stakeholders will collaborate to create tests that validate business requirements.

The book is clearly written and easy to read. At the end of each chapter, a summary proposes the main points discussed. The author proposes a lot of practical examples and case studies that help to apply the concepts discussed to real cases. Some chapters are only focused on the "how to" aspect of ATDD and an appendix shows how to implement it with different tools like Fit or Cucumber.

As the book insists about the collaboration between the users, developers and testers, I can recommend it to all project team members that want to improve their communication with end users and achieve a better understanding of requirements.


Agile Game Development with SCRUM (Addison-Wesley Signature)
Agile Game Development with SCRUM (Addison-Wesley Signature)
by Clinton Keith
Edition: Paperback
Price: £31.34

4.0 out of 5 stars Useful to a Larger Audience than Game Developers, 5 Aug. 2011
Drawing from his own experience as developer and CTO in the game development industry, Keith Clinton has written a book that provides both an overall vision of the Agile and Scrum approaches combined with a detailed practice of these principles in the specific context of game software development. It gives therefore also a good introduction to the software practices of the gaming industry. I noticed for instance that the customer - outsourcer relationships are not very different from the relationships between game production companies and external developers.

The book is well written and easy to read, with a lot of practical experience that Clinton Keith retrieved from his own professional career and contributions from other people involved in agile adoption for game development, especially in the "Myths and Challenges of Scrum" chapter.

Although it might naturally have a stronger appeal to game software developers and project managers, this book provides a lot of practical consideration that will be useful to a larger audience interested in transitioning to Agile.


Domain-Specific Modeling
Domain-Specific Modeling
by Steven Kelly
Edition: Paperback
Price: £78.95

4.0 out of 5 stars A must read for every software products developer, 28 Oct. 2009
Domain-specific modeling (DSM) is an approach articulated around three elements: a specific modeling language, code generation and a domain framework. The book authors work for a company that has been proposing a DSM tool since the last century. This make them first-hand experts on the topic, but you have also to remind which side they are when they talk about DSM compared to other approaches. The authors are conscious of this and discuss it openly, so that the reader can be aware of the situation. This being said, this book is an excellent and convincing presentation of what is domain-specific modeling, what it is not and how it relates to generic modeling approaches like UML. It contains more than 100 pages of real case studies showing how you can use DSM in different contexts (embedded software, insurance, etc). Finally, a final part guides you in details through the different steps needed to create a DSM solution. This part contains an important decision guide that will allow you to evaluate if your domain is suited for a DSM effort.

The book is very well written and is certainly a must read for every software developer who could be involved in the development of software that has some "product" attributes, that is software projects that involve repeated development efforts based on a common domain knowledge. It will also allow you to think and understand more deeply what is modeling and how you can reuse the initial investments in understanding the domain and creating the first products.


Agile Coaching
Agile Coaching
by Rachel Davies
Edition: Paperback
Price: £17.46

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Book for Every Software Manager and Developer, 1 Sept. 2009
This review is from: Agile Coaching (Paperback)
There was a time when software developers worked with consultants that will do things for their company or teach some technical knowledge. Agile approaches have brought forward another type of people: coaches. According to Rachel Davies and Liz Sedley, a coach doesn't tell you what to do, rather she shows you how she thinks you might do things and hope that it will help you to improve your situation. She leads by example. It is not easy to write a book on this type of topic. The authors recognize this situation and manage to achieve a good balance between general advice and practical usage reports.

The first part of the book is concentrated on the basics of coaching and communicating in software project. The software development curricula are often weak on "people" skills and you are not always lucky to find the right person as a supervisor when you get out of school. The second part goes through the different activities of a typical Agile project (daily meeting, user stories definition, planning, etc.) and discuss how coach can help a project team to achieve its goals. Each chapter has a final checklist and the book is also full of "personal stories" from the authors that enhance the theoretical advice, applying it on real situations.

Although the title of the book and some of its content might make you think that its value is limited to an agile context, I will recommend this book to every person that has some supervision function in software development organizations and to every developer who believe than acquiring additional "people" skill might improve its work environment. Just changing the way you talk with colleagues could lead to having more sunnier days at the office.


Implementing Automated Software Testing: How to Save Time and Lower Costs While Raising Quality: How to Lower Costs While Raising Quality
Implementing Automated Software Testing: How to Save Time and Lower Costs While Raising Quality: How to Lower Costs While Raising Quality
by Elfriede Dustin
Edition: Paperback
Price: £33.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A comprehensive treatement of the domain of software testing automation, 28 May 2009
This book presents a comprehensive treatement of the domain of software testing automation. The first part defines and describes test automation, proposing a business case for automation and discussing the pitfalls that should be avoided. The second part is a roadmap for test automation. It gives six keys for software testing automation payoff:
1. Know your requriments
2. Develop a strategy
3. Test your tools
4. Track progress and adjust
5. Implement the process
6. Put the right people in the process.
Four appendixes complete the book. They provide a process checklist, explain how automation applies to various testing types, disscuss tools evaluation and give a case study.

The fact that the autors have worked with the Defence industry might have affected the way the book was conceived and written: with structure and rigor. The discussions, recommandations, references and tools suggestions apply however to every software testing situation and not only to organization that are strongly process oriented. The aim of the book is to be a guide that can help to implement successfully automated software testing and it certainly achieve its objective.


Global Project Management: Communication, Collaboration and Management Across Borders
Global Project Management: Communication, Collaboration and Management Across Borders
by Jean Binder
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £80.00

4.0 out of 5 stars Useful help to manage global projects, 15 May 2009
In a global world, software development projects concern more and more people working in various locations or coming from different organizations and culture. Managing these projects requires thinking beyond the traditional project management techniques to integrate these additional global dimensions and deal with the new issues that they create. This book helps project managers to think about this situation by proposing a detailed framework dealing with the team, communication, organization, tools and techniques dimensions of global projects. Every chapter has a good balance between conceptual material and real life examples. Many checklists and models are proposed to help assessing the global aspects of specific situations. The author invites also the reader to think how the current topic is handled in his organization. Finally, the book provides many pointers to additional literature that could help a reader to get more knowledge on a particular topic.


Page: 1 | 2