Profile for Hex Austen > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Hex Austen
Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,937,227
Helpful Votes: 3

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Hex Austen

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
The End of Politcs and the Birth of iDemocracy
The End of Politcs and the Birth of iDemocracy
Price: £7.47

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Carswell Hits It On The Head, 29 Jan. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Douglas Carswell has written a superb book analysing and explaining previous political and societal structure and explains how the internet is changing traditional perceptions.

The end of politics as we have known it to now signifies the end of an age of traditional pyramidic hierarchical power. It IS the end of an Age and with it has come Judgment Day, accompanied by a monster call Transparency. Historically and traditionally the bloke at the top has been the one who restricts and controls information to the masses.

The Digital Age (the new age) has turned this upside down and now anyone can get hold of any information. The new political age will be one of iDemocracy. Social networking sites are the 'voice on the street' - and smart politicians will realise the full value of a properly worked and interactive Facebook or Twitter page. Currently a lot of mps use them as Fansites - they do so at their peril.

Douglas compliments this also by reminding the reader how personalised the internet is for the user and that in the future it is not inconceivable to have personalised profiles with personalised medical care, finances, even employment. I hope very much that Whitehall is listening to this man - and closely. Carswell blows apart traditional thought. His book is consistent, unbiased and full of commonsense and easy to understand prose.

If you want to understand the shift in our world, read this book.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 30, 2014 10:08 PM BST


Jerusalem: The Biography
Jerusalem: The Biography
Price: £6.17

5.0 out of 5 stars Jerusalem, 21 Jan. 2014
This herculean effort by Simon Sebag Montefiore has resulted in a work of art - a comprehensive and easy to read full history of Jerusalem from it's humble beginnings as a site for burials to the natural spring that encouraged building development and the creation of Jerusalem itself.

For such an ambitious project, Montefiore has illustrated a history of Jerusalem and its almost cyclical occupation by various races in breathtaking description, evoking strong reader absorption with a natural steady pace and development throughout. This book was easy to read, dramatic, thoughtful, accurate, exciting, historical but most importantly, unbiased.

I romped through this book with delight :)


Do the Birds Still Sing in Hell? - He escaped over 200 times from a notorious German prison camp to see the girl he loved. This is the incredible true story of Horace Greasley
Do the Birds Still Sing in Hell? - He escaped over 200 times from a notorious German prison camp to see the girl he loved. This is the incredible true story of Horace Greasley
Price: £3.59

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Do the Birds Still Sing in Hell, 21 Jan. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Do The Birds Still Sing In Hell is the account of WWII prisoner of war hero Horace Greasley and highlights the essence of British bulldog spirit at a time of deep deprivation, torture and starvation in one of the German workcamps.

Horace or 'Jim' as he was known by his army buddies was a typical farmer's lad from Leicester. After training he was ready to fight for his country in France when his CO surrendered his regiment to the Germans. He spent nearly five years in a high security prison camp splitting marble and lumberjacking for the Germans. Jim escaped from the camp regularly in order to meet his sweetheart for clandestine meetings - but always returned to the camp. Together with his sweetheart, he gathered extra food from nearby farms and even smuggled radio parts into the camp. He was ordered by his camp CO not to escape and not return because of the morale of 3,000 men who benefitted from his actions.

Do The Birds Still Sing In Hell is another account from an old soldier that reminds us all why we should be proud to be British.


Page: 1