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UltimateAddons 30 Pin to Female USB OTG Adapter for Samsung Galaxy Tab 8.9" - 10.1"
UltimateAddons 30 Pin to Female USB OTG Adapter for Samsung Galaxy Tab 8.9" - 10.1"
Offered by UltimateAddons-UK
Price: £1.79

1.0 out of 5 stars I have a Galaxy Tab 10. 1. It ..., 22 April 2016
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I have a Galaxy Tab 10.1. It is sold as fitting a Galaxy Tab 10.1. It doesn't fit my Galaxy Tab 10.1


The Emotion Thesaurus: A Writer's Guide To Character Expression
The Emotion Thesaurus: A Writer's Guide To Character Expression
by Angela Ackerman
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.51

5.0 out of 5 stars A great writer's aid!, 21 Mar. 2013
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This useful reference tool gives the writer a structured fast track into expressing emotion in their writing whilst avoiding clichés. The brief notes with examples at the beginning of the book give good insights into how to use the lists of physical signals, feelings, mental responses and behavioural cues to generate ideas.


A Ride In The Sun - Gasoline Gypsy
A Ride In The Sun - Gasoline Gypsy
by Peggy Iris Thomas
Edition: Paperback

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A bygone era…, 10 Mar. 2013
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This was a good, entertaining read. The story of a young woman’s motorbike ride around Canada, the USA and Mexico in the early 1950s, with an Airedale dog called Matelot for company. She rode a single cylinder three (!) horsepower 125cc BSA Bantam called Oppy. It was overloaded and underpowered, which led to a few problems - broken wheels, failed bearings, slow speeds and excruciating climbs over mountain roads.
I particularly enjoyed the little glimpses into how it was to ‘do the long ride’ then, compared with how much easier it is now.
The reproduction of the cover to the 1954 edition amused me. It showed the intrepid Peggy riding with a lady’s handbag slung over the handlebars. Who would ride a motorcycle around North America with a handbag hanging from the handlebars? Artistic licence I thought, at least until Peggy actually mentioned the handbag later in the book.
This made me curious about how she dressed for the ride – we modern motorcyclists wear helmets (most places it’s the law), boots and protective clothing. Here is what Peggy says about what she wore on the bike:
Jacket? Pants? “I began to feel so warm…It was a relief to get out of my tight jeans and hot socks, and I felt much more comfortable and cool in sandals and a cotton sun dress. I had made this costume myself especially…”
Helmet? “I sat down in my sopping dress; the hem was dripping on to the floor…My sandals flopped like boats, while my hair hung in lank rat’s tails…”
Gloves? “We left Richmond rather late…for the first time…I was wearing gloves for driving, as well as a sweater…”
Early on she had to stop to make some money to be able to continue the trip. She took two jobs - typing telegrams by night and falling asleep at her desk as an office stenographer by day. Later on, with the ravages of the road, she sometimes had to take less pleasant and more physically demanding work to fund the trip or even just to be able to buy food for herself and the dog.
The image of the dog endures, wearing its own goggles and happily riding on the back in its specially made box. Despite people’s surprise or concern to see this bold woman travelling alone with just the dog, Peggy made many friends. She had charm, as demonstrated by the relative ease with which she seemed to overcome officialdom in transporting bike and dog on trains & boats and across borders or maybe just avoiding a ticket from a polioceman.
There are many images of her riding into the evening, not stopping until well after dark, maybe riding until 11 or 12 o’clock and then pitching a tent. It must have felt like a safer world then. Wild camping, most times with only passing concern for personal safety. Pitching up late at night beside the highway, on the beach or in someone’s garden; or sleeping on the forecourt at the gas station, even sleeping on the tables in a bar after closing time.
Later in the trip, and after many miles, she had a bad run of punctures and breakdowns which left her stoically working on the bike herself or hitching lifts and repeatedly flagging down trucks to take the bike to the next repair shop, where she sometimes didn’t have enough money to pay for the repair. Time and again she met almost unfailing hospitality from all kinds of people, but this was slightly tarnished by the occasional application of male chauvinist from people who should have known better, such as the arrogant head mechanic at one motorcycle garage in Mexico City who subjected her to days of ‘manana’ before getting round to re-building the damaged back wheel.
Nowadays we can call someone on the cell-phone if we have a problem. We can take digital photos, which in many places we can download onto the internet each evening along with our e-mails and blog articles if we choose. This contrasts with the image of Peggy letting the bike fall, resulting in her losing her typewriter over the dockside along with her exposed rolls of film; and the persistent attempts to retrieve her property from the deep water when her boat was almost ready to sail.
This book offers more than just the story of a motorbike road trip. It gives many insights into how it was for a woman travelling alone in post war America. It was a different world then. A lifetime ago…


The Long Ride 'Home'
The Long Ride 'Home'
Price: £3.50

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Don't plan, just ride...!, 27 Jan. 2013
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Adventure motorbikers are rough, tough guys and gals, out there in the wilds, relying on their own resources? Right? Er...maybe.
Sydney to London...The Long Ride Home by Nathan Millward is a motorcycle adventure, a bright enjoyable read, with good descriptions of some challenging riding and some pithy insights. It all starts with an Australian girlfriend called Mandy; an ex-postie bike, a little red 110 cc Honda; and the spontaneity of a young Englishman.
Deadlines, threats, risks. Fear. These are the kinds of things that might come to mind when planning a long motorcycle adventure trip through many exotic countries. Some can spend forever planning - the over-planning of the dreamer who ultimately never manages to go on the big trip. But maybe it is easier to sail past all of that; avoid doubt and indecision; and just get out there. To quote Nathan - `I had the only planning you really need - to be certain that it's something you have to do. Not want to do, because that's not enough.'
And although the lack of planning was often endearing, it contributed to some of the difficulties Nathan met along the way. The untried, un-serviced, bike bought through eBay; the last minute dashes to meet visa deadlines; heel-kicking for days after missing the rare ferry.
What do you need for the ultimate `please yourself, take your time, meander about' adventure trip? Nathan seems at times to have had little in the way of protective gear, images of crashes tell a story. Tools? Um ...forget the tyre levers. Wild camping? Yes, tight budget. Camping equipment? Err ...maybe a sleeping bag. Tent?
To quote again from Nathan - `no commitments, nothing to go back to, no job, no kids, no mortgage.' Thankfully there are still credit cards to help carry the burden! And our intrepid rider still had to contend with the sweet impact of his interactions with his family back in the UK, delaying telling his mother that he had started a ride by motorbike back to the UK.
The Long Ride Home contains much good descriptive prose. An early image is the culture shock on arriving in East Timor after flying out from Darwin, contrasting the poverty in a post-war torn country with the wealth imported for the benefit of the UN peacekeepers. Then there are the descriptions of the altitude problems, mainly for the bike, going over the Himalayas on the Manali to Leh Highway. The difficulties in mending a puncture on the high pass, holding tools with frozen hands, being forced to ride into the hours of darkness searching for refuge. And Nathan certainly didn't shy away from attacking the more challenging roads. There was the beauty of the Karakorum Highway leading up out of northern Pakistan into China, running the gauntlet, riding alone almost on sufferance through the Swat valley where the welcoming friendliness encountered elsewhere had given way to a brooding mistrust.
Alongside the big challenges, the book is, at times, also imbued with a certain naivety. The `you guessed it' consequences for the camera left in the shower-room for safekeeping. The willingness, almost a preference at times, to ride through hours of darkness, whereas the soothsayers among us might point out that this is the time of most danger on unfamiliar roads.
Nathan speaks of sipping flavoured tea with other travellers at the lodge in Malaysia while enjoying movies. He watched `Into The Wild', but hoped for a better ending to his own adventure. I had read the book recently. Maybe Nathan's decision to grow his beard and not to comb his hair was a nod in the direction of Chris McCandless, the young American who starved to death in the wilds of Alaska on his great adventure. Although there are some similarities, the contrast between the two young men and their different adventure experiences is quite sharp. I guess Nathan wanted his independence but didn't really want to break away. For Chris McCandless it wasn't just a rite of passage - he truly wanted to escape from his family - finishing high school to meet his parents' expectations; leaving on his big trip without telling anyone where he was going; covering his tracks; letting his family suffer knives to the heart through not knowing where he was; giving away his family inheritance money; burning his cash; eventually abandoning his car and living the life of the hobo.
I admire Nathan Millward's honesty in telling his tale. With his low budget trip he succeeded in achieving things many of us never get to do in a whole lifetime.


The Author's Guide to Publishing Success (Previously: The Indie Author's Guide to the Universe)
The Author's Guide to Publishing Success (Previously: The Indie Author's Guide to the Universe)
Price: £0.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Indie Author Knowledge, 26 Jan. 2013
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I've read quite a few of these self-help kind of books for 'new-to-it' novelists. This one is a stand-out - the best. Many, many good ideas, tips, motivational stuff. It certainly helped me with the scramble up my steep learning curve!


Adventurous Motorcyclist's Guide to Alaska
Adventurous Motorcyclist's Guide to Alaska
by Lee Klancher
Edition: Paperback
Price: £19.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars All you need!, 22 Jan. 2013
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Contains almost all you need to know to be able to tour in Alaska by motorbike, couldn't find a section on when to come/ weather conditions. Nevertheless it is an excellent guide book, well focused, with good information. It certainly motivates me to plan a long-ish trip to Alaska and try out the wonderful roads and trails.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 15, 2014 1:23 PM GMT


Into the Wild
Into the Wild
by Jon Krakauer
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.29

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Incredibly thought provoking. The ultimate experience, 7 Dec. 2012
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This review is from: Into the Wild (Paperback)
Into The Wild challenges many assumptions. Is it truly possible to go back to basics and to survive in the wilderness without the trappings of modern society?
I found this book to be a good read, well researched and well written. The glimpses of other people's wilderness experiences and of the books that Chris McCandless read up to his death are enlightening.
At the end of it you are still left asking 'why?'. It is unsettling. Here was a young man who had a comfortable upbringing, a high-achiever who opted out of the life path that already seemed to be mapped out for him.
I think part of his motivation was the negative. The need to move out from the shadow of an ultra-achieving parent, the need to assert your own personality, an almost 'I'll show you' attitude as he displayed his own independence, perhaps exacerbated by a late discovery of the skeleton in the family cupboard.
But there is also a degree of irresponsibility - covering his tracks, effectively penalising those who cared about him, and the episode where he drove his car illegally far into the parklands, abandoning it in the gulch after a flood.
After time spent tramping the country, trying to improve his skills along the way, he seemed to be looking for the ultimate 'back to the wild' experience. Just what is this ultimate experience? Is it driving a well-stocked 4x4 down the tracks, parking up where other people might pass, telling friends and family where you are, putting the steaks on the barbecue and opening a few beers, taking a radio, maps, a decent hunting rifle, all the paraphernalia that modern society can provide? Or is it something else? I think Chris McCandless wanted this ultimate experience on his own terms. It meant he had to put his life in danger, and this led him to ignore advice and to take more risks than he needed to. For the experience to be real there had to be a significant risk of death. This meant no comforts, no easy escape routes. And it meant he really could die.
Was Chris' behaviour just a proxy for some kind of long drawn out suicide? I don't think so. He accepted the risk of death, even embraced it. Perhaps death would be the ultimate 'I told you so', but true success would involve surviving the experience; and at the end he was hoping for rescue. If he had a better map, better local knowledge, better understanding of what foods to eat, maybe the outcome would have been different. If...
This book inspired me to try to engage more with nature, but not to try to do what Chris McCandless did.


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