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J. Wallace (UK)
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Practical Statistics for Field Biology (Life Sciences)
Practical Statistics for Field Biology (Life Sciences)
by Jim Fowler
Edition: Paperback
Price: 18.59

5.0 out of 5 stars A really helpful guide to the use of statisticl methods in biology, 21 July 2013
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Statistical methods can be difficult for some biologists to get to grips with but the authors do a great job in explaining when, why and how to use a variety of methods using typical examples from field biology. Strongly recommended.


Here, Far Away
Here, Far Away
by Pentti Sammallahti
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 37.18

5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful photographs, 21 July 2013
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This review is from: Here, Far Away (Hardcover)
Samallahati is an extremely talented photographer and this is an excellent and beautifully produced collection of his photographs from around the world.


The Larger Moths of Warwickshire
The Larger Moths of Warwickshire
by David C. G. Brown
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars Great synthesis of what is known about the moths of Warwickshire, 21 July 2013
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David Brown who serves as the County Moth Recorder, has done an excellent job synthesizing the records of macro moths in Warwickshire into a coherent account.
The book is nicely produced and includes a number of decent photographs as well as line drawings of many species. Each species has a map showing distribution of records at the tetrad scale and an accompanying text giving details of national status, status within the county, larval food plants used and comments on abundance and (in some cases) trends. For some species annual trap totals from regular trapping sites are given as an indication of year to year changes in abundance, and for some infrequently recorded species the details of individual records are given. The individual species accounts are preceded by some introductory chapters which provide a description of the county and the habitats it includes, geology, an overview of the mixed fortunes of the moth species present in the county, conservation of moths in the county and a potted history of the study of moths in Warwickshire and the key personalities involved.

In contrast to butterflies, moths are undoubtedly under-recorded and whilst for some scarce species the gaps in the maps really do indicate the absence of the species, for many others it is likely that the gaps are in part a reflection of the fact that some squares have been little searched. It is to be hoped that this book will act as a challenge to the lepidopterists of Warwickshire to explore these areas and fill the gaps.

Overall a fine and useful book. Hopefully a companion volume on the micro moths will follow in due course!


Philip's Guide to Butterflies of Britain and Ireland
Philip's Guide to Butterflies of Britain and Ireland
by Jeremy Thomas
Edition: Paperback

25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great little butterfly guide, 9 Nov 2009
Butterflies are undoubtedly the most popular group of insects and this is reflected by the wide range of books available to help identify them, so what then are the chief selling points of this little guide?

The Philip's guide is the latest version of a book that began life as the RSNC Guide to the Butterflies of Britain and Ireland in 1986 and the publication of the current version (in 2007) allowed for extensive revision and updating to reflect changes in the status of the butterflies since the earlier edition as well as the changing state of our knowledge and understanding of their biology.

One of the key differences between the Philip's guide and many of its competitors is the fact that it is restricted to the butterflies of Britain and Ireland. This means that it will not be a satisfactory choice for anyone intending to use it on butterfly hunting holidays on the European continent where there are about six or seven times as many species as are found in the British Isles. The benefit gained however is that it allows much more space to be allocated to each species in what remains a slender volume that would not weigh you down on a foray into the field.

Each species is thus accorded a two page spread which provides a much more detailed account than is the case in most field guides. The text, by Jeremy Thomas, is clearly written and provides an informative portrait of each species and its biology. The text is supported by clear diagrams that indicate the typical time of year at which one can expect to encounter each life stage and life cycle drawings that indicate the habitat in which each of the immature life stages occurs as well as indicating what it looks like.

For the illustration of adult butterflies opinions differ as to the relative merits of paintings versus photographs but this guide opts to provide the best of both worlds. In a section near the beginning of the book, each species is illustrated at approximately life size by the well known insect painter Richard Lewington. These high quality illustrations show both upper and undersides of each sex and are annotated in order to highlight key identification features. In the individual species accounts that follow, each species is further illustrated by decent photographs that show the insect in typical attitude and habitat as the reader might encounter it in the wild.

Overall, then this is an excellent little guide that is well worth its purchase price.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 18, 2010 11:35 AM BST


The butterflies of Britain and Ireland
The butterflies of Britain and Ireland
by Jeremy Thomas
Edition: Hardcover

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent reference guide to british butterflies, 6 Oct 2009
I chanced upon this book in a bookshop at around the time it was published in 1991 and have consulted it regularly ever since. Jeremy Thomas, perhaps the leading butterfly expert in the country, provides a charming text that reflects his love of butterflies as well as his deep knowledge whilst the peerless Richard Lewington provides beautiful plates that show each life stage of all of the species regularly occuring in the UK as well as a number of rare vagrants and species that are now extinct. Adult stages are shown life size.
The large format of the book (250 mm X 255 mm) means that it is not suitable for taking out into the field but the wealth of information included, covering aspects of identification, variation, distribution, life-cycle, ecology, food plants and behaviour, make it a worthy reference to include in any entomologist's library. Now only available second hand it is nevertheless well worth seeking out a copy.


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