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J. Davis "John Davis" (Manchester)
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The Complete NIV Audio Bible: Read by David Suchet (MP3 CD) (New International Version)
The Complete NIV Audio Bible: Read by David Suchet (MP3 CD) (New International Version)
by New International Version
Edition: MP3 CD
Price: £31.98

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How The Bible Should Be Read, 22 May 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Superbly read by Mr. Suchet. The NIV falls nicely on the ear, especially from this actor's lovely voice.

The arrangement of the MP3 files on the discs is a little awkward and won't suit some, as it precludes simply playing the tracks on CD-only units. However, the facility to drag and drop specific files onto the desktop or onto a writeable CD is a good feature.

All round the production is a treat. Thanks to David Suchet and the sound engineers for such a patient, careful and reverent reading of the Word.


People's Friend Annual 2014 (Annuals 2014)
People's Friend Annual 2014 (Annuals 2014)
Price: £3.81

5.0 out of 5 stars Thoroughly Traditional, Thoroughly Modern, 25 Sept. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A beautiful book, in overall colour and design, reminiscent of annuals from years ago. Nostalgic, but up-to-date, a pleasure to see on the shelf and a pleasure to read.


Varta 3W LED Indestructible Beam Lantern
Varta 3W LED Indestructible Beam Lantern
Price: £29.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Heavyweight Light, 18 Oct. 2012
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This product comes in a blister pack, containing 2 D batteries separated from the unit. Assembly is straightforward. There's no conventional bulb to break, and the pin-point light given off reaches a good 30 to 40 feet. This torch is built like a tank, though I didn't try dropping it, so don't know if the manufacturer's claims re 'indestructible' are correct (nothing is). The unit has a simple rubber-covered click on/off switch. It probably would hold up well in wet weather, though I couldn't test it for that. The grip is designed to be held in such a way as to project the beam forward. For walks at night, I found that pointing it at the ground cast a circular beam of about two-and-a-half feet in diameter, illumination enough to walk with confidence.

The torch is quite heavy and too large to slip into the pocket of a weather-jacket or a rucksack -- a disadvantage if you want to stow it whilst on a hike, one reason I can't give it top marks.

Summing up, if I hadn't got it to test, I probably wouldn't go out of my way to buy it.


The Kingfisher Football Encyclopedia
The Kingfisher Football Encyclopedia
by Clive Gifford
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars A Beautiful Book on the Beautiful Game, 16 May 2010
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
It's been many years since I was a lad with a case ball and stiff brown leather boots, and such a handsome book as `The Kingfisher Football Encyclopedia' was not on offer in that grey world of terraced stands. But I would certainly have wanted this one. Go on, sniff the pages -- it's Christmas all over. At eight-and-a-half inches by eleven, with 144 colourful, glossy pages bound between jacketed sturdy covers, this heavy tome will look good on your coffee table or your bookshelf for years to come.

Containing oodles of information on domestic and international players, clubs, managers, rules of the game, and dispensing handy tips on strategy and personal technique, this volume arrives on the doorstep at the right time and in the right year. A fold-out chart at the back lists the groups of the World Cup 2010 and a listing of past Cup winners, but the book is not narrowly devoted to this competition. Published under the imprint of Macmillan's Children's Books, this edition is geared for youngsters old enough to play the game and their Dads. It's literate, with a sensible and intelligent vocabulary, and does not patronise the reader.

History, statistics, and action photographs endow this one with style and movement. It's one to keep and to thumb through and stir the juices when you're no longer yourself a lad.


Fry's English Delight: Series 2
Fry's English Delight: Series 2
by Stephen Fry
Edition: Audio CD

4.0 out of 5 stars Oy! Wot's Up, 11 April 2010
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This four-episode, two-CD set of the tastily-entitled `Fry's English Delight' is instructive and entertaining. In winsome fashion and beautiful Received Pronunciation, the ubiquitous polymath, Steven Fry, takes a learned and comic look at the fluid nature of our wonderful spoken language. He uncovers the origins and evolution of `Hello', enunciates the importance of elocution, and jabbers about the importance of gibberish to the developing brain.

Fry subscribes to the principle that persistent use of a `wrong' word or pronunciation should eventually make it `right'. In so doing he offers a brisk and undisguised rebuke to those who defend the `rightness' of British English -- oral, aural, and written. You know, the awkward squad who don't care for `HA-rass' or who take umbrage at errant apostrophes and, chalk in hand, transpose them to their proper location (to which this reviewer pleads a little guilty). Great galloping neologisms! Certainly, the glory of the English language is its variety and flexibility, and its corporate willingness to adapt to the times. But if speaking good is not the BBC-like priority it used to be, perhaps the same ought not be allowed for the mix-uppery of the written version? When `lose' is widely misspelled `loose', and `alternative' contracts to the American variation `alternate', are we better off? (Even Amazon.co.uk now enrols its reviewers in the Vine `program'.)

There's lots of room for argument here. Regardless, `Fry's English Delight' is just that. Almost two hours of delightful and edifying listening.


A Seaman's Book of Sea Stories
A Seaman's Book of Sea Stories
by Desmond Fforde
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Treats Ahoy!, 21 Feb. 2010
It's not unhelpful to know, when immersing oneself for an hour or two in this shortish collection, `A Seaman's Book of Sea Stories', that the book is published under the auspices of the Prostate Cancer Charity, to whom profits from the sales are directed. A worthy thought to augment the mind-catching appeal of these tales, ranging from Hornblower to the Fleet Air Arm in the Pacific. With this selection, all British, the compiler, Desmond Fforde has chosen wisely and well.

Two stories especially, `Without Incident' (G. Drake) and `Aircraft Carrier' (John Winton), weave themselves into the imagination with their first-person accounts of potential tragedy at sea and the onset of cold stark fear in the cockpit of an F4U Corsair. These authors, intimately familiar with the nautical and aeronautical jargon, awash with colour, put you there on the spot, almost well enough to make you giddy with the rolling sea and to duck and flinch from the Japanese gun batteries at the assault on the strategic island in the Pacific war. Much of the idiomatic terminology, whimsically shorthand, was new to me but, oddly, self-defining. For those terms that weren't, the OED is at hand.

The nasty blip on this particular literary horizon is the poor quality of the proofreading. Some editor was absent from his post on the bridge when it came to this, and errant commas, semi-colons, and the rendering of a `laddie' as a `lad die', betray a distinct lack of attention. One star off for that, I'm afraid. Apart from that, you could do worse than splice the main brace with a strong, hot cuppa, hard tacks off to one side, a comfy armchair, and launch yourself into this collection. For better effect, read on a dark and stormy night, matey.


Fowler's Modern English Usage (2nd Edition)
Fowler's Modern English Usage (2nd Edition)
by H.W. Fowler
Edition: Paperback

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Words in your ear, 21 Feb. 2010
More than a dictionary of definitions, this handy Fowler's (paperback, 1983 rev. edition, Gowers) expresses opinions on the use and misuse of words and parts of speech (dropping prepositions, , noun-adjectives), and is interesting and enlightening reading. The entry on 'program', for example, tells me that this was the British way of spelling this word until somewhere in the 19th century. The dual use today of the idiomatic 'me' ending -- as in radio P) -- and the shorter, more widely-used version -- properly restricted in application in British English to a computer P -- is a helpful bit of information usually outside the scope of a standard dictionary.

The explanations are lucid, the text is set in a clear, legible 9pt type, double-columned pages, with white space between each bold-face entry. It's not a substitute for a dictionary. There are only 6 entries under 'Z', for example. It concentrates on grammar and usage. As a tool for the writer's kitbag, Fowler's is a valuable addition.


Whose Side are They On? How Britain's Bonkers Government Is Coming After You
Whose Side are They On? How Britain's Bonkers Government Is Coming After You
by Alan Pearce
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £9.99

3 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Deification of Daftness, 13 Dec. 2009
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
If just a fraction of the litany of lunacy unravelled in this 240-page book is accurate Britons should worry. From hilarious penalties on overfull bins, to cascading on-the-spot fines, to the rejection of a passport photo of a topless baby, our land of ancient liberties has fallen prey to quibbling bureaucrats.

Not knowing how obstreperous Citizen A or B may have been at the time of arrest, it's difficult to determine how liable any of us might be to the same treatment. One likes to think that police and judicial authorities are sensible people who'd prefer to let you go than lock you up. The lurking suspicion that they may not be so sensible drives a wedge between public and police. Loss of liberty tarnishes life's pleasures. We know that we must endure inconveniences at the airport and in public places for the sake of collective safety, but at what level of application do the security measures become a routine destined for permanence? Someone has to strike the balance between restrictions for safety's sake versus smothering control of the citizenry. It's why and who is striking the balance which is the broad concern of Alan Pearce's, Whose Side Are They On?

The author's style is direct, his astonishing facts marshalled into categories. The nature of the occasional typographical error (`loose' for `lose', `expences') tarnishes the integrity of the presentation, even if mere lapses in proofreading technique. Nonetheless, if this volume paints a true picture of Britain at the beginning of the 21st century, one can only wonder what we might expect in a decade or two. Herein lies a strong argument for engagement in politics, if only to keep an eye on those who would deprive us of freedoms hard won by previous generations.


A Cry from the Streets [DVD]
A Cry from the Streets [DVD]
Dvd ~ Max Bygraves
Offered by alentertainment
Price: £29.99

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Welcome addition to DVD library, 14 Nov. 2009
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: A Cry from the Streets [DVD] (DVD)
Touching and evocative of 1950s Britain, 'A Cry from the Streets' has become one of my own firm favourites. The opening harmonica theme, played by the incomparable Larry Adler, sets the tone for anyone who grew up during that period. The black and white cinematography suits the often grim mood of this production.

There are two stories here: the plight of all the children abandoned for one reason or another at the well-meaning but mediocre institution, and the romance between the electrician, Bill (Max Bygraves) and the social worker, Ann (Barbara Murray). Their affecting and chaste relationship is interwoven with that of the children, particularly young Barbie and her two brothers. Another thread follows Don, an older teen looking for his long-absent mother.

The director, Lewis Gilbert, did a splendid job in coaching the young actors and everyone turns in a fine performance. Max Bygraves is impressive in his part, his natural ease shining through. Pity he didn't go farther in film.


The Oxford Manual of Style
The Oxford Manual of Style
by R.M. Ritter
Edition: Paperback

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars So far, so good, 10 Nov. 2009
I got this manual for general guidance on form as to author references (citations). It does that, and more, but I haven't used it long enough to bump it to 5 stars, worthy of the Oxford name in general.

It's an attractive paper-bound version, with crisp print, and a clear index. This book and 'The Chicago Manual of Style' for the American side of things make a good pair on the shelf.


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