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Catherine (Norfolk, United Kingdom)

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Kindle PowerFast Charger for Accelerated Charging, UK (for Kindle Fire tablets and Kindle e-readers)
Kindle PowerFast Charger for Accelerated Charging, UK (for Kindle Fire tablets and Kindle e-readers)
Price: 17.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A rip off, 10 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Angry. I bought this as my USB connecting cable to Kindle Fire needed replacing and I saw this one was available, offering a fast charge. I stupidly assumed it would include a cable. No such luck, I now realise Amazon expect me to sell out another 9.99 for that. So that means I've just paid 28 for the privilege of charging my Kindle. Paying, in fact, for a product which should come with the Kindle in the first place.

I am currently charging my Kindle using this with the old cable and it's only on half charge after 4 hours of charging. Feel ripped off.


Comfort & Spice (New Voices in Food)
Comfort & Spice (New Voices in Food)
by Niamh Shields
Edition: Paperback
Price: 11.99

5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Charmed, 26 Aug 2011
This book is full of what followers of her blog come to expect - charm, warmth and lots of delicious food which spans a broad spectrum of cuisines. Niamh has the ability to entice any reader into wanting to cook her recipes and does that rare thing - takes the fear out of using a whole host of interesting ingredients, so that even fairly inexperienced cooks should feel confident about trying anything. Whilst there are recipes for every mood, I particularly like the fact that a few things are done from first principles, such as rose petal butter or home made ricotta. Finally, thank goodness we are finally waking up to the joys of brunch in this country. Niamh has some interesting ideas - I think we'll be eating Turkish eggs tomorrow.


Supper Club: Recipes and notes from the underground restaurant
Supper Club: Recipes and notes from the underground restaurant
by Kerstin Rodgers
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 20.00

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful book, stunning recipes, 5 April 2011
This book is unique - not only is it incredibly beautiful, full of Kerstin Rodgers' whimsical style (think French vintage with an edgy, slightly subversive twist), it is also eclectic in terms of recipes. This is because it is based upon The Underground Restaurant - the author's supperclub which is never allowed to rest on its laurels, but is constantly coming up with interesting themes. The book includes some of these, including a Midnight Feast of black food (Black Russians, Squid-ink Tortelloni, Marmite Chocolate Cupcakes) and Elvis Night (Deep-Fried Peanut Butter & Banana Sandwiches, Blackened Catfish) and the ridiculously pretty Flower Menu (Stuffed Courgette Flowers, Marigold Bread, Elderflower Fritters, ice cream served in a Flower Ice Bowl). Other interesting ideas include making butterscotch schnapps with Daim bars, vodka and your dishwasher, flavouring popcorn with butter, chilli and lime as well as taking lots of things back to first principles - candying citrus peel, for example.

This is a lovely cookery book, full of things I personally would like to try, but it's also an excellent read, offering as it does a glimpse into what is clearly a fascinating life.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 21, 2013 1:06 PM GMT


Not On the Label: What Really Goes into the Food on Your Plate
Not On the Label: What Really Goes into the Food on Your Plate
by Felicity Lawrence
Edition: Paperback

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An important treatise on the food issues of today, 16 Feb 2005
To dismiss this book as bad or junk science as some reviewers have done would be a mistake. Yes, Felicity Lawrence does talk about the problems of intensive food production and the merits of organics, but the book is so much more than that. It is informative regarding the relationship between supplier/retailer/consumer (some of which I know to be true living in a rural area and knowing the problems some of the smaller scale farmers and market gardeners have had with some of the major supermarkets), the issues surrounding intensively farmed meat, the environmental problems and the insanity surrounding the way in which our food is transported...
Although I've always been aware of the importance of some of these issues (being very careful about where I buy meat and dairy, trying to be as seasonal as possible etc), the extent of some of the practices Lawrence uncovers were shocking. I am not anti-capitalist and I don't think that this is the main focus of this book either. It merely points out some of the more abhorrent practices of some of the largest trans national companies, and discusses how imposing free trade on the developing world puts them at the mercy of some of the greediest conglomorates. Felicity Lawrence has travelled and researched extensively and has produced an informative, and in my opinion, well balanced book on some issues of which we should all be aware.


An Embarrassment of Mangoes: A Caribbean Interlude
An Embarrassment of Mangoes: A Caribbean Interlude
by Ann Vanderhoof
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Brings the Caribbean to life, 17 Jan 2005
The Caribbean is one of my favourite places in the world, and there seems remarkably little travel writing focussing on it, so I was delighted to come across this book.
The balance between sailing anecdotes, island stories and recipes was, in my opinion, just about right. I was not particularly interested in the technicalities of sailing when I first started reading - it's a mark of how well Ann Vanderhoof manages to get her reader to empathise with her, that I was drawn in all the same. The chapters on Grenada were particularly good, no doubt because of the relationships which developed between Ann, her partner Steve and some of the locals - there was more insight and emotional pull, alongside some wonderful descriptions of the island's flora - in particular the nutmeg plantation. I was also favourably impressed with some of the recipes. Some ingredients are demystified, there is a "hunter/gatherer" mentality over a variety of different things pervading the book, and I loved the descriptions of the preparation of conch and lobster.
By the time I reached the conclusion of the book, I felt really sorry that the couple had to return to Canada, and felt that I'd been on quite an emotional journey with them. I only wish that they could have spent longer exploring some of the other islands and therefore expanded the book. It seems a shame, for instance, to visit Trinidad and not Tobago, and to either completely bypass or rush through wonderful places such as Nevis and the British Virgin Islands.


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