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Breville Cafe Style Sandwich Press
Breville Cafe Style Sandwich Press
Price: £26.94

5.0 out of 5 stars Great for students/coeliacs...., 6 July 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This is a fantastic little machine! Being coeliac, I have a difficulty sharing toasters with others because of the build-up of wheat particles, but with this I can easily wipe clean the plates after each use so can finally eat toast like anyone else. And that is just the start. You can use the 'floating top' design to toast any thickness of bread with room for a generous filling inside. I have so far made New York style smoked salmon and cream cheese bagels, Paddington Bear Toasties (recipe below), and crunchy double thin crust pizzas. An excellent set of trendy recipes using all kinds of bread is included in the pack. The machine is very easy to use, the only slightly confusing thing is that the green light goes off when it has reached the required temperature. It would make an ideal present for students with limited cooking facilities who want to make filling and healthy snacks.

Paddington Bear Toasties
Switch on the sandwich maker.Butter two slices of bread before adding a generous amount of thick cut marmalade to each. Put the two sides together and cut on the diagonal. By this time the green light should have gone off. Put the sandwiches inside the sandwich maker and allow the lid to close down. Wait six or so minutes. Lift lid. If sandwiches are nice and toasted remove and put on a plate. Eat.

Enjoy!


Cetaphil 295 ml Restoraderm Skin Restoring Body Moisturiser
Cetaphil 295 ml Restoraderm Skin Restoring Body Moisturiser
Offered by RedTag Event
Price: £14.97

5.0 out of 5 stars Nasty scales gone!, 4 July 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This is a fantastic unperfumed, white lotion. It has cleared up the nasty scaly patches on my legs within a few days. The pump action is easy to use, it rubs in well, and leaves no greasy surface trail. Wonderful as an after sun cream and safe for the entire family. If you have anyone around you who has a dry skin condition I would highly recommend it.


Rimmel London Kate Lipstick Summer - Pink Rose
Rimmel London Kate Lipstick Summer - Pink Rose
Price: £5.49

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Strange colour undertone., 1 July 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
I thought I would love this as I wear lots of pink lipsticks and glosses during the summer months, but I don't. I think this is because of the rather strange shade which has orange instead of blue undertones making it most unflattering on a pale skin. The lipstick itself goes on quite well, though nowadays I prefer pencil type products or those that come with a wand for greater definition. It smells nice and is moisturising. However it soon fades so must be applied several times a day.


Rosewood Apple BioSafe Dog Toy
Rosewood Apple BioSafe Dog Toy
Price: £6.35

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars My dog can't get a squeak out of it..., 30 Jun. 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This toy certainly looks sturdy and could be a lot of chewy fun for a dog. But I'm sad to report my beagle cannot get her jaws around it, and will only play with it for a few seconds before getting bored. It's annoying for her as she can see me plainly getting it to squeak, but she can't copy me! On top of this, I am not convinced that hygiene is that important in a dog toy. I am more interested in those toys that are either recyclable or made out of recycled materials. I don't like needlessly adding to the plastic mountain.


Oral-B Pro Vitality Plus Cross Action Electric Rechargeable Toothbrush
Oral-B Pro Vitality Plus Cross Action Electric Rechargeable Toothbrush
Price: £37.48

4.0 out of 5 stars Best on market, except for battery., 28 Jun. 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Usually when you see products on TV advertised as "recommended by dentists" it turns out to be a complete lie. Not so with this toothbrush which my dentist pushed to the hilt as being 'the best on the market' at my last visit. And it is true the swishing round head really does appear to get into every nook and cranny leaving one's whole mouth feeling tingly clean. In this particular package the brush comes ready charged with two heads and a two pin recharger unit. You also get an amazingly full set of instructions in every language under the sun as well as a guarantee card. My only moan about this brush is that you have to recharge the battery at least every five days (my Phillips sonic model lasts a good ten days). This means if you take it on holiday you must remember to take all the charging caboodle with you (which may include your own adaptor plug). For this reason I have given it four rather than five stars.


skinChemists Advanced Wrinkle Killer Night Moisturiser 50 ml
skinChemists Advanced Wrinkle Killer Night Moisturiser 50 ml

4.0 out of 5 stars Effective product, 24 Jun. 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This is a very light, pleasantly scented, product, that is easy to apply and which soaks quickly into the skin. I have applied it to my face, neck, and décolleté, as well as to the back of my hands for a week as per instructions. I can't say I have noticed much difference in the wrinkles on my face. However, the effect on my hands has been nothing short of miraculous; they are now really moist and smooth. Of course, this could be due to the coconut oil as much as the snake venom. And maybe putting any hand cream on at night would have this effect; I have never thought of doing it before. However, I have also noticed my neck and décolleté areas are also much improved in appearance, so overall, I think this cream is a good one and will continue using it in the future.


skinChemists Bee Venom Facial Serum 30 ml
skinChemists Bee Venom Facial Serum 30 ml

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars No difference, 24 Jun. 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
I was really scared when testing this serum, when the packet clearly said, "Do not use if you are allergic to bee stings". As I've never been stung by a bee, how could I tell whether I was allergic or not? What I did to get over my terror, was to apply a small portion of the serum to the inside of my arm near my elbow, just as we used to be told to do when trying a new hair dye, and leave this overnight. Only when I had satisfied myself that my arm remained a normal size, did I proceed.

I then tested the product morning and night for a week, and I have to say that, even though I noticed a tightening effect on application, I haven't noticed any difference concerning the state of my wrinkles. All I have noticed is that my skin is actually drier than usual. So much for the supposed moisturising properties. I don't usually use a serum but I do apply an oil (Decleor or Akin) every morning before moisturising, and I find this suits me a lot better.

I feel this product should come with a leaflet giving details of how to do a patch test and showing users how best to apply the product. It is possible that I just wasn't using it properly. As it is, I don't see the point of applying something to your skin that is potentially dangerous when much more effective, plant-based, products are available.


Great Myths of Aging (Great Myths of Psychology)
Great Myths of Aging (Great Myths of Psychology)
by Joan T. Erber
Edition: Paperback
Price: £16.95

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not convinced, 24 Jun. 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Among the myths covered in this book are:
1. All old people are deaf
2. Old people do not have sex
3. Old people are forever falling down or having car accidents
4. Old people are all forgetful and suffer from dementia
5. Old people are wiser
6. Old people are grouchy and antisocial
7. Old people want to live with their kids
8. Old people all end up in nursing homes
9. Old people are all afraid of death.

The trouble with myths, as you can see from the above, is that they assume that everyone is the same. All you need to do to destroy a myth, therefore, is to find some people for whom the myth is not true, for instance, some happy sex-loving oldies with bright minds. And this is essentially what this, very small, thin book does, producing some research in each case that goes against the myth. I was not impressed with the credibility of this research as details of the methods used were not included (though, I should add, a detailed set of references is included). I also found the U.S. bias annoying. Overall, I could not believe that anyone would believe in the "myths" in the first place, and was not convinced by the evidence against them.


I Hope I Don't Intrude: Privacy and its Dilemmas in Nineteenth-Century Britain
I Hope I Don't Intrude: Privacy and its Dilemmas in Nineteenth-Century Britain
by David Vincent
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £25.00

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars No Connection, 19 Jun. 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
"I hope I don't intrude" is the catchphrase of Paul Pry, the principal character of a farce written by John Poole and first performed at the Haymarket Theatre in 1825. Even though the play was considered very weak, its fame soon spread around the English speaking world. Ships and pubs were named Paul Pry. Cartoons, posters and porcelain figures were produced of the actors who played Paul Pry on stage. All this was news to me, and I would have been very happy if the book had kept to this highly interesting and surprising piece of social history.

Instead, David Vincent tries to link the play with the issue of privacy in nineteenth century Britain, seeming to imply that it is because of this dilemma that audiences are rolling in the aisles rather than because of the sheer brilliance of the main actor, John Liston, who turns the farce into an interactional tour-de-force with his repetitive use of catchphrases and his elaborate costume. Yes, Paul Pry is indeed an inquisitional busybody, but I don't think he represents fears that people had about the post office or other new forms of information flow!

So, that is the problem with the book. On the one hand, Mr Vincent discusses the success of the play. On the other, he writes a great deal, and with an over abundance of social science jargon, about privacy. The two just don't connect. One just gets the feeling that he has written down everything he has found about in his research. Some of this contains real gems: I loved the bit about the history of the umbrella! The rest is just turgid.

What struck me on reading the book is how ephemeral celebrity fame is. I had never heard of the play, Paul Pry, the catchphrase, or the principal actors. On the other hand, fundamental human concerns such as how much information should be kept secret and how much discussed, are timeless. A comparative social history of the latter would be very interesting indeed.


Energy, the Subtle Concept: The discovery of Feynman's blocks from Leibniz to Einstein
Energy, the Subtle Concept: The discovery of Feynman's blocks from Leibniz to Einstein
by Jennifer Coopersmith
Edition: Paperback
Price: £19.99

5.0 out of 5 stars History of science at its best., 15 Jun. 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Although this is a tough read, and you need to have your mathematical wits about you to cope, I must say I highly recommend this book which really brings the history of the concept of energy to life. I particularly liked the early chapters with all the drawings of ancient machines and devices. Then the slightly snide little asides concerning the characters of the various scientists kept me interested as the maths got tougher. I was a bit disappointed in this new edition that Ms Coopersmith didn't mention how ecologists depend on the laws of thermodynamics to describe the structure and functioning of ecosystems, as this was how I became interested in the subject, and it is surely an area most pertinent to us today. Still you can't have everything. As a history of science textbook this stands head and shoulders above the rest.


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