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E. Moore (Glasgow UK)
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100 Brief Encounters: When Geronimo met General Miles and Other Strange Meetings
100 Brief Encounters: When Geronimo met General Miles and Other Strange Meetings

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Author Speaks! I love it and give myself five stars, 12 Jun. 2013
Thought I should add some glowing reviews of the print edition (published by Chambers in 2007) -

Edwin Moore's quirky collection of a hundred encounters between (mostly) important historical figures is a gem of a book. Where else could you get concise enlightening accounts of Henry VIII wrestling with Francis I, Geronimo surrendering to General Miles, Ernest Hemingway presenting Fidle Castro with a fishing trophy or (as seen on the books cover) a baby faced Bill Clinton shaking hands with John F Kennedy. A marvelous 'little window on human history. ' - Dominic Kennerk, Waterstone's Product Planning and Promotions Co-ordinator (From the Waterstone's 'We Recommend' list for 2008)

Witty, light and packed with information -- The Sunday Herald

In 1936, in the wake of winning a clutch of gold medals at the Berlin Olympics, the great athlete Jesse Owens was snubbed by an imperious leader, on racial grounds. Popular belief would have it that the leader was Hitler, who is said to have stormed off, furious to see a black man beating European athletes. In fact the man in question was President Roosevelt, who worried that paying attention to Owens' triumphs might be a vote loser. Although Owens and the German Chancellor never talked, Owens claimed that Hitler greeted him with an enthusiastic wave. Such near-misses, shakings of hands and ships-in-the-night meetings are the subject of Brief Encounters - Meetings between mostly remarkable people, a likeable new book by Edwin Moore (Chambers £7.99). Flicking through the index, you will find some expected encounters (Dante stares at Beatrice, Corday stabs Marat, The Beatles strum along to a Charlie Rich record round at Elvis's house), and the book's intriguing and memorable cover shows a baby-faced Bill Clinton manfully gripping the hand of JFK. But Moore has navigated past some of the more obvious collisions, collusions and confrontations of history (there is no Dr Livingstone, I presume) and much of the book's pleasure derives from lesser known incidents.

Inevitably, some of the accounts of earlier meetings are somewhat sketchy but Moore offers some piquant speculation, laced with humour (the book is tagged Reference / Humour, rather than History and this feels right, but the book, though wry and opinionated, never stoops to wackiness). I was intrigued to discover that, though Attila the Hun did die on his wedding night, it was not in drunken and lecherous debauchery, as his enemies maintained, but supposedly because he was generally a simple and clean-living man who had a few too many which brought on a particularly bad nosebleed.

Moore's book is full of such tales - it would be wrong of me to steal the tastiest morsels of his research and pepper this article with them, but look out for a subsidiary reason for the Gunpowder Plot (too many dour and powerful Scots in Parliament); a great meeting of great beards, as Castro wins the Hemingway prize for sea-fishing; Dali bringing a skeptical Freud round to the art of the surrealists; Buffalo Bill's wife claiming an aged Queen Victoria had propositioned him; Oscar Wilde getting a kiss from Walt Whitman, while Walter Scott was more taken with Burns's charismatic eyes. This is an enjoyable and vigorous rattle through some fascinating and believable yarns. My only quibble is that it's a little on the short side - let's have Volume 2 please Chambers! - Roddy Lumsden,[...]


The Scottish Colourists: 1900-1930
The Scottish Colourists: 1900-1930
by Philip Long
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £13.46

5.0 out of 5 stars Value for money, 12 Dec. 2011
This book is excellent value for money - a lovely book and well produced as well as being an authoritative study.


TORQ Kids Chaos Two-Wheel Scooter - Chrome
TORQ Kids Chaos Two-Wheel Scooter - Chrome

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good price, 17 Aug. 2011
= Durability:3.0 out of 5 stars  = Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars  = Educational:3.0 out of 5 stars 
Excellent value from this seller, wouldn't want to pay much more - the tip on the stand fell off in a few days but child happy with it


No Title Available

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Truly Excellent, 18 Sept. 2010
Simply the best and most endurable water bottles we have ever bought (even the tubes they came in are classy!). And excellent service too.


Jenny's Birthday Book (New York Review Children's Collection)
Jenny's Birthday Book (New York Review Children's Collection)
by Esther Averill
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £10.00

5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely brilliant, 15 April 2010
Friend sent us the lovely youtube animation and we then bought the book - wonderful book, should be better known


The Stolen Village: Baltimore and the Barbary Pirates
The Stolen Village: Baltimore and the Barbary Pirates
by Des Ekin
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.99

17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent History, 28 Feb. 2009
A very fine book indeed on a topic of increasing interest and relevance - the slave trade driven by the Barbary Corsairs resulted in over a million Europeans being taken into slavery, from Iceland to Spain.

The question of of captives and identity is a tragic one. Women and children in particular suffered badly, but over the years return becomes almost impossible - this is the case the world over. An old Kiowa woman who died in the 1920s only found out weeks before she died that she was white - all of her real family had been butchered by the people she thought were her real family.

The author doesn't try to mitigate the horrors of this slave trade - of any slave trade - and its consequences.


The Man Who Sold Nelson's Column: And Other Scottish Frauds
The Man Who Sold Nelson's Column: And Other Scottish Frauds
by Dane Love
Edition: Perfect Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining and informative, 8 Feb. 2009
. . . and should be much better known. As Sunday Mail of 8/02/09 says, the author is one of the few people to have spotted something that Stephen Fry's QI has not, in this case that the great fraudster who supposedly sold Nelson's Column may never have existed.

Excellent wee book for lovers of Scottish and quirky reference works.


The Scots' Crisis of Confidence
The Scots' Crisis of Confidence
by Carol Craig
Edition: Paperback

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Corrective, 23 Jan. 2009
Ms Craig's book is an excellent (and constructive) corrective to many of the self-constructed fantasies we Scots tend to have. Her comments on the book Being Scottish are quite brilliant, I thought, and her section on Donald Dewar has universal application - we all want a messiah, but we all somehow want to be let down by them also - maybe Scots more than most.

An important and very readable book; wish I'd come across it before.


The Dog Allusion: Gods, Pets and How to Be Human
The Dog Allusion: Gods, Pets and How to Be Human
by Martin Rowson
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent wee guide to what we think about the gods and why we think it, 3 Nov. 2008
Do disregard the Telegraph quote guys - this wee book really has sod all to with loving or hating dogs. It is rather a very witty guide the nature of belief, with much interesting digression for a bonus: few of us, know, for example, that the English were once renowned for their cruelty to animals.

Mr Rowson is of course one of our finest ever cartoonists - this book shows he is also a very fine writer.


Curious Scotland: Tales From a Hidden History
Curious Scotland: Tales From a Hidden History
by George Rosie
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wish I'd read it earlier, 11 Oct. 2008
To my shame, Mr Rosie's book has passed me by until recently. I think it's a wonderful book, and do wish I had read it earlier. The book is revelatory, with lots of stuff I didn't know. I didn't know, for example, about the gruesome executions of those of Bruce's enemies he could get away with killing, and my acquaintance with the old North Britons is now much extended, as is my knowledge about much of Scotland's hidden yet significant byways.

It's always a good sign when you remain in disagreement with an author yet accept he or she has made a good argument: I have never, for example, come across a better case being made for John Knox. It didn't quite convince me, but I now have a much better understanding of the man.

Mr Rosie writes beautifully as well - I devoured the book in three nights. Great stuff.


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