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Dr. D. Tracy (London)
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Dr Gillian McKeith's Ultimate Health Plan: The DIET Programme That Will Keep You Slim for Life
Dr Gillian McKeith's Ultimate Health Plan: The DIET Programme That Will Keep You Slim for Life
by Gillian McKeith
Edition: Paperback

27 of 32 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Nonsense, 18 April 2007
I'm reminded of the anecdote of two friends in a jungle: when they spot a tiger, one puts on his trainers. His companion laughs "you'll never outrun a tiger, even in those", to which the first replies "no, but I'll outrun you". There's an evident dichotomy in the reviews of all McKeith's books, with her decerebrate fans tending to find she has "changed my life completly" and "I would deffinatly reccomend this book" (lucky for them it's not a case of "you are what you spell"). Ultimately, McKeith's quackery proves that she doesn't have to be smart, just smarter than you.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 13, 2008 9:16 PM BST


You Are What You Eat : The Plan that Will Change Your Life
You Are What You Eat : The Plan that Will Change Your Life
by Gillian McKeith
Edition: Paperback
Price: 10.49

71 of 111 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Nonsense, 4 Jan 2006
I, unlike "Dr" McKeith, am a medically qualified Doctor. As such, I can tell you that her advice is nonsense: at best she's a misinformed fool, at worst, a charlatan taking money from the ignorant. You will lose about ten pound by buying this book, but, unfortunately, it's all in money, not fat.


Dr. Gillian Mckeith's Living Food For Health: 12 natural superfoods to transform your health
Dr. Gillian Mckeith's Living Food For Health: 12 natural superfoods to transform your health
by Dr Gillian McKeith
Edition: Paperback
Price: 7.99

84 of 144 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A fool and their money..., 27 Jan 2005
This book is a fine example of how to take money from fools. "Dr" McKeith is a fantastic entrepreneur, and is highly skilled in taking money from people whose weights exceed their I.Q.s. By replacing "sensible exercise and plenty of fruit & veg" with "blue green algae" and advising people whom she hasn't met that they suffer with allergies, she has successfully shown that lack of knowledge in a field is no hinderance to fooling those who know even less. I applaud her actions; if you're stupid enough to buy this book, she's clever enough to deserve your cash.


The Naked and the Dead (Flamingo modern classics)
The Naked and the Dead (Flamingo modern classics)
by Norman Mailer
Edition: Paperback

8 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 6 Aug 2004
It's not a bad book, just not a great book, and I had expected more on my first journey into the world of Mailer.
Perhaps part of the blame lies in 'war fatigue'; I think it's probably difficult to appreciate this book now for what it once must have been. No doubt seminal in it's time, it now feels like a template for (doubtlessly inferior) war movies such as 'Platoon' (Sergeants Croft and Barnes are interchangeable). Unlike some reviewers, I didn't mind the 'time machine' device whereupon Mailer, near each chapter's end, explores the book's characters' past lives. However, I felt the characters themselves were lifeless, and that the attempt to distinguish and delineate them only underlined this. ("I'm the Sporty one, she's Posh...")
Despite the disappointing characters, the book's redeeming factor was the description of human frailty and suffering, which did ring true.
Incidently, the author's '50th anniversary review' stank of such pomposity it almost stopped me before I started


The Waves (Wordsworth Classics)
The Waves (Wordsworth Classics)
by Virginia Woolf
Edition: Paperback
Price: 1.89

26 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I was, but not now., 2 Aug 2004
Who's afraid of Virginia Woolf?
She was an author I had put off reading for some time now, for reasons I'm not sure I fully understand, but having finally got around to reading her once, I'm looking forward to a second chance.
For the first time in a long time, I have found myself shocked by a book. By the style as well as the substance. I remember an old friend describing the first time he heard 'Sunshine of your love' by Cream in the sixties and how he thought 'I didn't know you could do that, make that sound with a guitar'. Reading this book shocked me out of the complacency of what a novel could be or achieve.
In a stream of consciousness narrative, echoing the tide's waxing and waning over a single day, the novel follows the life of six friends from childhood to old age. It's a novel of feeling and sound, emotive more than cognitive. Poignant, halcyonic, melancholic - like it's author. A wonderful poetic gift that needs to be felt. A book to return to again and again.


Julien Donkey Boy [1999] [DVD]
Julien Donkey Boy [1999] [DVD]
Dvd ~ Ewen Bremner

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Poignant study of personal and family decay, 16 Mar 2003
A touching tale of a young man's attempts to understand the world around him through the hazed glasses of psychosis. Beginning and ending with images of an ice-skater, the film explores the juxtaposition between such beauty and freedom of form with the harsh reality of life.
Julien, the main character, suffers not only from schizophrenia, but also the brutality of life which has drawn deeply on his dysfuntional family. A harsh, severe father gives his children confused and ambiguous lessons on life, most beautifully countered by Julien's poem "Morning chaos, evening chaos, night chaos", which surmises his existence tersely.
In the face of this, the children draw strength from each other; Julien's pregnant sister pretends to be his dead mother over the telephone to comfort him. The pregnancy itself is shrouded in mystery, with undertones of an incestuous affair. Julien's claiming of the resultant stillborn child as his is, I feel, best taken as a metaphor for an unholy love, a product of their shared existence, and a statement of their future. In this way, it may be felt to echo David Lynch's 'Eraserhead', and indeed the main protagonists hurt by and for the world resonate deeply with each other.
A beautiful movie, a parable of the struggle and difficulty of life.


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