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Amon.E.Mus. "Mo." (London)

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Victims (Alex Delaware)
Victims (Alex Delaware)
by Jonathan Kellerman
Edition: Paperback
Price: 3.86

2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing..., 17 Dec 2013
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I do not know how I managed to see this book till the end. The characters are dull, the plot was average at best since it was very typical and unoriginal, and to top it all off the ending was very anti-climatic: The apprehension of the perpetrator in 2 pages no more. Kellerman could provide more psychological reasoning and insight given his background but this was insufficient to say the least. If you are interested in psychological reasoning in a crime thriller read Caleb Carr. Will not be reading another Kelleman novel.


The Lion's Game: Number 2 in series (John Corey)
The Lion's Game: Number 2 in series (John Corey)
by Nelson DeMille
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.29

4.0 out of 5 stars Comical, Ignorant, Intelligent., 7 Aug 2013
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This is the journey of Khalil and his quest for vengeance and what better than hundreds of lives to quench this lion's thirst? On his tail, John Corey, who has got to be the most humorous lead I have ever come across in a novel, let alone the crime genre. Demille's time spent in the military comes to light here, increasing our knowledge in aviation that bit further. It is also evident that Demille, either in research or experience, knows well the politics of the NYPD, CIA and the Terrorist Task Force. This is a well researched novel, and although the beginning I felt was a bit too drawn out I felt it added to the suspense and helped develop the characters of both Corey and Khalil. I give this 4 stars because I felt it was a bit ignorant towards Arabs and Muslims, I understand this was released around the 9/11 attacks and felt that the author could bank on the stereotypes and ignorance of most Americans. I feel that the author is well informed of the ways of Arabs (see Gabriel Haytham )yet portrayed the character this way because it was a characteristic most commonly accepted.


The Alienist: Number 1 in series (Laszlo Kreizler & John Schuyler Moore)
The Alienist: Number 1 in series (Laszlo Kreizler & John Schuyler Moore)
by Caleb Carr
Edition: Paperback
Price: 7.19

4.0 out of 5 stars This is a historical thriller..., 27 July 2013
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Per the title. I have read a few of the reviews and it seems that a few readers have not appreciated the fact that this is a historical thriller (and in case you hadn't noticed it says so on the cover) Yet there are comments to the likes of "nothing that hasn't been said before" - Really? What other crime thriller gives a vivid a detail on the history of New York socially, Red Indians, Immigrants and so forth? Caleb Carr also gives a great insight into criminology and psychiatry of the antagonist that is unparalleled, all these elements alone make this a page turner.

O and I can never get over the comment "historically inaccurate"... one word: Fiction. There is no fiction that provides 100% accuracy historically. It is an oxymoron for a book to be both historically accurate and a fiction, if you don't like it then pick up a history textbook. A few of the other reviewers mentioned he overdoes it on the culinary aspect - that probably takes up no more than 5 pages of the entire book (it being 534 pages long ) which amounts to 1% - big deal.

Misses out on full marks for lack of character development and not enough twists and turns which should be a given in any crime novel. Still, if you're interested in a good lesson in history and psychiatry - then a must. 4/5.


Collusion
Collusion
by Stuart Neville
Edition: Paperback
Price: 5.24

4.0 out of 5 stars Not as good as 'the twelve', 31 Mar 2013
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This review is from: Collusion (Paperback)
As another critic mentions this is one star down from Stuart Nevilles debut novel. I personally accredit this to the storyline; I feel the book is primarily based on the final showdown between 'The Traveller' and Fegan, and as a reader I was disappointed with the anti climax. Whereas I felt fulfilled with the ending in 'The Twelve' I did not so here. Nontheless, it was definitely worth the read, Its not your typical hard boiled, gritty crime novel. Neville focuses more on the action i feel as opposed to the drama.


The Fever Kill
The Fever Kill
by Tom Piccirilli
Edition: Perfect Paperback

3.0 out of 5 stars A tad dull, 12 Mar 2013
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This review is from: The Fever Kill (Perfect Paperback)
I found it quite uneventful, the drama was lacking, as was the character study. There is nothing here that another author could execute a lot better. It just didnt satisfy my thirst for the grittiness and the dark element of crime. Nontheless, it was still readable, Tom's use of methaphors are excellent and there are a few moments where you can find yourself laughing at the dark humor.


The Dog Fighter
The Dog Fighter
by Mark Bojanowski
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Where is the respect..., 15 Feb 2013
This review is from: The Dog Fighter (Paperback)
that this writer clearly deserves? I picked this up from my local bookstore and was blown away by the narrative. The development of the main character throughout the novel is outstanding, although he appears both brutal and misanthropic the reader cannot help but empathize with him, just someone who is misunderstood. Although his writing style is simplistic, it is definitely not simple, he seizes the readers attention from the first page and never lets it go. Upon research I further discovered that critics had compared the authors writing style to Hemingway, which Bojanowski himself humbly claimed was an honor. I keenly await another release from the writer, but nothing to date unfortunately.


Every Dead Thing: Introducing Private Investigator Charlie Parker
Every Dead Thing: Introducing Private Investigator Charlie Parker
by John Connolly
Edition: Paperback
Price: 7.91

4.0 out of 5 stars Missed out on 5 because..., 13 Feb 2013
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Connolly is an expert in acquainting the reader with the plot, the characters, and manifests into the storyline a darkness that is unequalled. However, this is a novel that could have been a bit more concise. I feel that Connolly placed too much effort in the description of trivial and irrelevant objects and whatnot, also, the ending was tediously protracted, this would have been remedied had there been a bit more focus on the psyche of the antagonist. Nontheless, there are moments in the book where the intricate details are required for the effect, if it doesnt bother you then this is a must.


The Travels of Ibn Battutah
The Travels of Ibn Battutah
by Ibn Battutah
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent job by Tim Mackintosh, 15 Jan 2013
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The difference in Islam and the Middle East today and during the travellers time are apparent after reading this book, Battutah describes the philanthropy of all Middle Eastern governors and those in elite positions and their care and concern for those less fortunate. You gain a deep insight of a people and their culture, dress, food, and so on. Ibn Battutah also relates several interesting anecdotes of main figures in the book, these parts were the ones I found most interesting and made the book worthwile. As one other critic described, the book is a tad repetitive and does begin to bore you towards the end, nontheless, it is still worth a read, especially if you are a Muslim and would like to understand the differences in the Middle East today and then. Lost in translation? Most definitely not, Tim Mackintosh-Smith makes an exceptional effort in translating Battutah's original work and although I have not read the original Arabic works myself I confidently commend the Authors efforts.


Atlas: From the Streets to the Ring: A Son's Struggle to Become a Man
Atlas: From the Streets to the Ring: A Son's Struggle to Become a Man
by Teddy Atlas
Edition: Paperback
Price: 8.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Great Read., 12 Mar 2010
Teddy Atlas, a man misunderstood in youth, would be arrested and imprisoned several times only to be bailed by his father, A doctor and philanthropist who would discuss everything with his patients and community, but a stoic to his own broken family. Atlas provides with the excitement his hardships as a youth, both in his household and the streets, his difficulty in accepting he could no longer continue boxing but would still be involved as a trainer in the D'amato camp, the battles he had in the D'amato Camp to eventually leaving, his difficulties training former HW Champ Michael Moorer,to the moment he would refrain from murdering Donny Lalonde,and many more. A carer at heart, Atlas proves to be a duplicate of his father, giving back to his community, setting up a trust fund in his fathers name, a honest character in a corrupt sport. A narrative that would be slow to build at the beginning, and thus a deserved four in my opinion.


Dark Trade: Lost in Boxing
Dark Trade: Lost in Boxing
by Donald McRae
Edition: Paperback
Price: 11.08

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ignore anything less than 5 *., 12 Mar 2010
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As the title mentions, anything under 5 this book does not deserve. A well written experience of a man who has come across many a big name in the fight game, he captures James Toney in outstanding fashion, the aura he builds in the dressing room and a fighters entrance is second to none. He explains the back and forth feud between Kallen and Toney, how a young fatherless james toney would become champ, his shortcomings and failures. He also discusses his interviews with Tyson whilst he was imprisoned and brings a different Tyson to surface, his disgrace at Eubank, and a young and enthusiastic Naseem before he was the prince.


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