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Paul Nicholl

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The Black Flash: The Albert Johanneson Story
The Black Flash: The Albert Johanneson Story
Price: 6.08

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Black Flash - a book that should be read by all lovers of the game, 9 Mar 2013
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On 22nd August 1961 my father took me to my first ever football match. My local team, Brighton, were playing Leeds. I can remember very little about the game. Jack Charlton sat on the ball during a stoppage, there was a great midfield display by a youngster called Bremner, but the real stand-out performance was by the Leeds left winger. Someone behind me in the crowd told his neighbour thart this was the danger man, and I then overheard their conversation about the latest "Danger Man" episode on the telly! The subjecty of their concern for the Brighton defence was Albert Johanneson, and it was an apt description. I knew very little about him. I knew he was South African and I saw the 1965 Cup Final on the TV, but he slightly faded from the scene as Leeds went into their glory years. This book does much more than reveal the true story of this most remarkable man as it touches on issues that we should all be aware of. For the reaction that Albert Johanneson received from people in England was often quite disimilar to what I witnessed at Brighton and the racial torment he endured really needed to be documented. I therefore applaud Paul Harrison for doing just this in his well researched book.


THE PILOT AND THE COMMANDO: The interlinked lives of two young Christians in the Second World War
THE PILOT AND THE COMMANDO: The interlinked lives of two young Christians in the Second World War
Price: 2.70

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Teachers on the front line, 17 Aug 2012
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The Pilot and the Commando is a gripping read. Not only is it very important to understand what this generation went through during the Second World War, but also to realise the impact that it had on the rest of their lives. David Carter and Jos Nicholl were to go on to inspire future generations both inside and outside the classroom, but this book gets to the heart of how their own early lives were shaped by war. The book is a clear reminder that each November when we remember those who died during the First and Second World Wars, we should also pay tribute to those who survived and lived out the rest of their lives with a background knowledge of the full horrors of war. Both the Pilot and the Commando were sustained in this by their Christian faith, which runs through the heart of the book and enables the reader to have a real glimpse at how Christian lives were led in these dark days.


Beastly Fury: The Strange Birth Of British Football
Beastly Fury: The Strange Birth Of British Football
by Richard Sanders
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beastly Fury, 29 July 2010
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Beastly Fury is one of the best books I've ever read; the fact that I just could not put it down and completed the 300 pages in twenty-four hours underlines this. It is a well-researched history of the birth of British football that encompasses divisions within society that include both class and nationality. The main contributions for the origins of the game are carefully analysed, as the roles of both the public schools and working men are put in their context. The influence of Scottish football is also covered, but don't expect every little detail of footballing events up to 1915 to be covered. The author has picked out events relevant to the development of the professional game and guided us through a range of personalities who left their mark on our national sport. One fascinating aspect is the description of the style of football played within these shores which, in the light of the recent World Cup failure, gives much food for thought.


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