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Emil Belsky (Omaha, Nebraska USA)

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Common Worship: Daily Prayer (Common Worship: Services and Prayers for the Church of England)
Common Worship: Daily Prayer (Common Worship: Services and Prayers for the Church of England)
by House Publishing Church
Edition: Paperback

94 of 98 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An Outstanding New Breviary, 9 Aug 2005
The Church of England's Liturgical Commission and Church House Publishing are to be congratulated for the outstanding work done in producing the definitive edition of "Common Worship: Daily Prayer." This revision of the Church's daily round of prayer should set the standard for other revisions throughout the Anglican Communion. Particularly noteworthy is the overall structure of these offices, their flexibility, and the tone and mood set with each seasonal variation. You begin to wonder at how so much could be included in so small a book! I especially appreciate the many scriptural canticles (pp. 548-644) and the options of beginning Morning Prayer with "The Acclamation of Christ at the Dawning of the Day" (p. 108) and Evening Prayer with the ancient ceremony of the "Blessing of Light" (p. 110).
While much that is good can be found here, there are also some things which, to my mind, require closer scrutiny. Verse 3 of Psalm 3 (p. 651) where God is referred to as "the lifter up of my head" and verse 2b of Psalm 115 (p. 823) "Where is now their God" seem awkward and unfortunate renderings. Because of their importance to these offices, a thorough review of the Psalms for translation and euphony is in order (while not perfect, the inclusive language version of the Grail Psalms might be considered). Most of the Forms of Intercession (pp. 366-399) are absolutely right on (see pp. 376, 394-395) while some need further work (see p. 374, which strikes me at least as too wordy and preachy).
These minor problems should not, however, detract from the great achievement overall of "Common Worship: Daily Prayer"--to make available to the ordained and non-ordained alike a round of daily prayer that is simple enough to be used widely, flexible enough to allow for local adaptation, and of ample inspiration and appeal as to invite use in daily prayer. I will continue to use it as part of my own daily spiritual discipline.


Daily Prayer (Common Worship: Services and Prayers for the Church of England)
Daily Prayer (Common Worship: Services and Prayers for the Church of England)
by Church of England
Edition: Paperback
Price: 10.96

23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding Revision of the Daily Office, 29 April 2002
Church House Publishing and the Church of England's Liturgical Commission are to be congratulated for the outstanding work done in producing "Common Worship: Daily Prayer." This revision of the Church's daily round of prayer should set the standard for other revisions throughout the Anglican Communion. Particularly noteworthy is the overall structure of these offices, their flexibility, and the tone and mood set with each seasonal variation. Indeed, you begin to wonder at how so much could be included in so small a book! I especially appreciate the many scriptural canticles and the options of beginning Morning Prayer with "The Acclamation of Christ at the Dawning of the Day" and Evening Prayer with the "Blessing of Light."
While much that is good can be found here, there are also some things which, to my mind, require closer scrutiny. Verse 3 of Psalm 3 (p. 579) where God is referred to as "the lifter up of my head" and verse 2b of Psalm 115 (p.751) "Where is now their God" seem to be awkward and rather unfortunate renderings. Because of their importance to these offices, a thorough review of the translation and euphony of the psalms would seem to be in order. Also, the prayers provided at the conclusion of each psalm are of uneven quality. Then too, the invitation to prayer concluding each Lenten petition on page 338 (where God is addressed in the second person) should more properly read "We pray to you, O Lord" rather than "Let us pray to the Lord"; otherwise addressees seem to become confused as you go along.
These minor problems should not, however, detract from the great achievement overall of "Common Worship: Daily Prayer"--to make available to the ordained and the non-ordained alike a round of daily prayer that is simple enough to be used widely, flexible enough to allow for local adaptation, and of ample inspiration and appeal as to invite use in daily prayer. I look forward to seeing and using the definitive edition when it becomes available!


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