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Mrs. A. Iredale (Oldham England)
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Classroom Observation: A guide to the effective observation of teaching and learning
Classroom Observation: A guide to the effective observation of teaching and learning
by Matt O'Leary
Edition: Paperback
Price: £24.29

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classroom Observation: A Guide to the Effective Observation of Teaching and Learning, 22 Nov. 2013
I was looking forward to reading this book, particularly as it's the first time this topic has been approached in a critical and sophisticated way - beyond the 'how to' and 'how not to' teach literature that pervades the bookshelves. This book provides a real insight into the role and purpose of lesson observations, revealing the vested interests, management agendas, and ideologies surrounding the surveillance of teachers. It should be essential reading for quality managers, Ofsted inspectors and those wishing to critique the 'taken-for-granted' assumptions about this contentious subject. I particularly liked the mix of socio-political context and critique, the broader sociological discussions about professionalism, and the clear guidance about ways in which observation can be used by teachers to reflect on their practice. I would recommend this text for all PGCE/Cert.ED courses.

Alison Iredale FIFL, FHEA,
Director of Learning
Oldham College


Classroom Observation
Classroom Observation
by MattOLeary
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Classroom Observation, 15 Nov. 2013
This review is from: Classroom Observation (Paperback)
I was looking forward to reading this book, particularly as it's the first time this topic has been approached in a critical and sophisticated way - beyond the 'how to' and 'how not to' teach literature that pervades the bookshelves. This book provides a real insight into the role and purpose of lesson observations, revealing the vested interests, management agendas, and ideologies surrounding the surveillance of teachers. It should be essential reading for quality managers, Ofsted inspectors and those wishing to critique the 'taken-for-granted' assumptions about this contentious subject. I particularly liked the mix of socio-political context and critique, the broader sociological discussions about professionalism, and the clear guidance about ways in which observation can be used by teachers to reflect on their practice. I would recommend this text for all PGCE/Cert.ED courses.

Alison Iredale FIFL, FHEA,
Director of Learning
Oldham College


Page: 1