Profile for Holger Haase > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Holger Haase
Top Reviewer Ranking: 3,553,787
Helpful Votes: 36

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Holger Haase (Cork, Ireland)
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
James Bond: The Man and His World - The Official Companion to Ian Fleming's Creation
James Bond: The Man and His World - The Official Companion to Ian Fleming's Creation
by Henry Chancellor
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Long overdue and a Must Have for all serious Bond Fans, 6 Jan 2008
There are scores of books around about the James Bond movie series, however, this one is unusual in that - bar a few rare paragraphs - it focuses almost entirely on the books that inspired the movies. This is a long overdue concept and a fascinating read.


How Mumbo-Jumbo Conquered the World: A Short History of Modern Delusions
How Mumbo-Jumbo Conquered the World: A Short History of Modern Delusions
by Francis Wheen
Edition: Paperback
Price: 7.49

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Must Read, 26 Nov 2007
Wheen makes a very good point about how we are living in a far less enlightened age than, say, our grandparents (or great-grandparents) in the 1920s. In actual fact seeing that the word "enlightenment" was created during the French Revolution to praise all things scientific and rational, it is very frustrating to see that the term is now primarily used in connection with New Age gobbledeegook. The moment you hear some of your friends claim that it is equally valid to teach Creationism as opposed to Evolution as a "choice", throw that book at them.


Men's Adventure Magazines in Postwar America (Midi Series)
Men's Adventure Magazines in Postwar America (Midi Series)
by Max Allan Collins
Edition: Paperback

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not for Girls, 26 Nov 2007
I just can't get enough of books about cheesy pulp fiction cover illustrators. I should have thought it's enough to own the very similar IT'S A MAN'S WORLD, but when I found a copy of MEN'S ADVENTURE MAGAZINES for less than a tenner I just had to have it. Best tenner I ever spent in a long time: For the money I got more than 500 pages of richly illustrated cover reproductions of sweaty men and busty babes in various degrees of peril, bondage or torture by Nazis, Commies, Bikers or, errr, flying squirrels plus the occasional article to convince myself that I am actually "reading" a book. The first time round you're bound to just wanna go through the book cover by cover and see it.... and will invariably miss quite a lot. Next time open the pages randomly and really look at the illustrations in depth and marvel at the wealth of detail in those realistic works of pop art. As the saying goes: They just don't make them like they used to.


The Enemy: (Jack Reacher 8)
The Enemy: (Jack Reacher 8)
by Lee Child
Edition: Paperback
Price: 5.96

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Same as usual, 26 Nov 2007
As usual for the Jack Reacher novels, this is a quick and entertaining read. As usual also, the mystery isn't all that mysterious. Maybe it is just me, but I have yet to come across a Jack Reacher novel in which I don't smell the big surprise a few hundred pages before it is revealed to the readers.
Still, it is good, undemanding airport literature.


The Work We Were Born to Do: Find the Work You Love, Love the Work You Do
The Work We Were Born to Do: Find the Work You Love, Love the Work You Do
by Nick Williams
Edition: Paperback

15 of 26 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars More spiritual mumbo jumbo than career advice, 4 Feb 2006
This book changed my life.
Errr, no, it didn’t. Yes, I am in need of change, but that book wasn’t any real help.
The best that can be said about it is that it is trying to teach you the right attitude to find the work you love, but if you want to come up with any solid plans and ideas as to what this is going to be you are better off checking out the likes of CHANGING CAREERS FOR DUMMIES or John Lees’ HOW TO GET A JOB YOU LOVE.
The trouble with Nick Williams’ book is that it is a continuously making career change a “spiritual” journey. On pretty much every page you find references to God, a creator, a Spirit, miracles or quotes from Christian, Buddhist, New Age or other sources. He even mentions in his introduction that his intention is not “to start another religion or create another doctrine”…. which of course can only be written by someone who is obsessed with “spiritual enlightenment”. (A contradiction in terms.)
Well, call me materialist, but I like my career change books filled with exercises that help me discover what I am good at and interested in and exploring ways in how to make money out of these interests.
I gave it 2 stars just because every 20 or so pages I did find the odd nugget to think about.


Blagging it: How to Get Almost Everything on the Cheap
Blagging it: How to Get Almost Everything on the Cheap
by Paul Nero
Edition: Paperback

13 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Neither here nor there, 26 Mar 2005
This is a book that is neither here nor there. The authors don't seem to be able to determine whether the tips included here should be humorous or serious and subsequently fail in both attempts. The proper tips (e.g. saving money on flight tickets by becoming a courier) sound helpful, but often aren't: In this day and age of low cost airlines most routes already have cheaper routes for regular flights than what you get when you travel as a courier. The humorous tips on the other hand (e.g. swap your in-tray for your out-tray at work to blag that you're a real busy worker) frankly aren't that funny. Bit of a hybrid of a book that kinda fails on both levels. A fast, but not very memorable read.


Page: 1