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Niccolò Tempini (London, UK)

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Krusell ColourCover Clip-on Case for Sony Xperia Z1 - Black
Krusell ColourCover Clip-on Case for Sony Xperia Z1 - Black
Price: £11.56

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars best case, 9 Jan 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
this is the best case I have ever had for any smartphone.
grippy, slim, and very tightly fitting. Makes the phone easier to hold in the hand while typing. Perfect buy.


Original Sony Magnetic Charging Cable USB for Xperia Z1 , Z1 Compact , Z Ultra
Original Sony Magnetic Charging Cable USB for Xperia Z1 , Z1 Compact , Z Ultra

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars NOT ORIGINAL. And not functional either, 7 Jan 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The item is NOT original, unlike the seller is stating. There's several reasons:
- no model number, no inscriptions of any sort except for the sony logo. No documents, no labels, no nothing.
- the usb port is huge, so huge that it cries fake; Sony has so carefully designed the Z1 in all its details, and manufactured everything so nicely, that it is impossible that they are marketing a cable with such a laughable design.
- the magnetic port plastic is irregularly shaped thus resulting in a poor fit.
- the magnetic hold is weak and the cable will come off with minimal force if exercised from the sides. Nothing like the Mac-kind of magnetic works.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 21, 2014 12:33 AM GMT


Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work and Think
Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work and Think
by Viktor Mayer-Schonberger
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £17.83

9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Elephant in the glass shop, 5 May 2013
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My issue with Big Data is that it does not take big data seriously enough. Although the authors have pedigree (Editor at the Economist; Professor at Oxford) this is not an academic text: it belongs to that category of popular essays that attempt to stimulate debate. Anyone who works with data (e.g. technologists, scientists, politicians, consultants) or questions what will be borne from our age of data affluence may have expectations for this book - unfortunately it falls short on providing any real answer.

The book paints an impending revolution in mighty strokes. The authors claim the impact of data-driven innovations will advance the march of humankind. What they end up presenting is a thin collection of happy-ending business stories -- flight fare prediction, book recommendation, spell-checkers and improved vehicle maintenance. It's too bad the book's scientific champion Google Flu Trends, a tool which predicts flu rates through search queries, has proven so fallible. Last February it forecast almost twice the number of cases reported by the official count of the Center for Disease Control.

Big data will certainly affect many processes in a range of industries and environments, however, this book gestures at an inevitable social revolution in knowledge making (`god is dead'), for which I do not find coherent evidence.

The book correctly points out that data is rapidly becoming the "raw material of business". Many organisations will tap into the new data affluence, the outcome of a long historical process that includes `datafication' (I'll define later) and the diffusion of technologies that have tremendously reduced the costs involved in data production, storage and processing.

So, where's the revolution? The book argues for three rather simplistic shifts.

Read the rest of the piece on the LSE Review of books, at bit. ly/bigdatareview


"Raw Data" is an Oxymoron (Infrastructures)
"Raw Data" is an Oxymoron (Infrastructures)
by Lisa Gitelman
Edition: Paperback
Price: £20.95

5.0 out of 5 stars Data: Always Grown, Washed and Stirred Before Crunching, 10 April 2013
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Edited by NYU media historian Lisa Gitelman, this book is a stimulating and useful collection of essays which characterize practices at the heart of the increasingly data-centric society in which we live. It provides us with conceptual tools with which to critically engage with emerging topics like, for instance, Big Data.

Newspapers and the business world are abuzz about the data revolution. In these times, when writers sometimes put too little commitment into weighing competing claims, there is need for academic voices to step into the debate. Academic work reminds us that much research about data and its organizational and social implications has been produced. While this book is not heavy on `back-linking', it provides some well-read and original empirical research; a breath of oxygen through the hot air we have been getting from preachers of all sorts.

The elegant title of this collection states its main argument well: there is no such thing as `raw data'. In her introduction to the volume, Gitelman points to the interpretive essence of data: "data are imagined and enunciated against the seamlessness of phenomena". Since data are always imagined, they embed assumptions. Through the book, we learn how the material context and format of producing data sets anticipates and affects their interpretive possibilities.

So what are the lessons that the volume teaches us?

Read the rest of the piece on the LSE Review of books, at bit. ly/rawdataisoxymoron


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